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Maryland 
L 

158 
.877 

1950/51 



Maryla^t^ Room 
jslty of Mifylirid Libr«- 



06 lOT CinCDLiTS 



STATE OF MARYLAND 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



EIGHTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



SHOWING CONDITION 

Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

For The 
Year Ending June 30, 1951 



Of The 




State Board of Education , 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



STATE OF MARYLAND 
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION— JUNE 1951 



Name Address 
TASKER G. LOWNDES, Pres. .. Cumberland 
NICHOLAS OREM, Vice-pres. . . HyattsviUe 

WENDELL D. ALLEN Baltimore 

JEROME FRAMPTOM, JR Federalsburg 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr., 



Name Address 

MRS. ALVIN THALHEIMER. .. .Baltimore 

MRS. CURTIS WALKER Che%-v Chase 

RICHARD W. CASE Baltimore 

Jcretary-Treasurer, Catonsville 



OFFICE OF THE STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore-1 



State Superintendent of Schools 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr. 
Ass't. State Supt. for Vocational Education 

JOHN J. SEIDEL 
Ass't State Supt. in Finance and Research 

DAVID W. ZIMMERMAN 
Directors 

MERLE S. BATEMAN, Certification and 

Accreditation 
JAMES E. SPITZNAS, Instruction 
Supervisors 

GRACE L. ALDER, Elementary Schools 
ELIZABETH AMERY, Home Economics 
BRIAN M. BENSON, Finance 
R. FLOYD CROMWELL, High Schools 
WILBUR DEVILBISS, Teacher and High- 
er Education 
R. CHRISTINE HOGAN. Research 
MRS. GLADYS T. HOPKINS, Curriculum 
PAUL E. HUFFINGTON, Colored Schools 
DWIGHT P. JACOBUS, Educational Serv- 
ices to Industries 
HERSHEL M. JAMES, Industrial Educa- 
tion 

HARRY M. McDonald, Agriculture 
EVELYN MILLER, Home Economics 
JAMES L. REID. School Plant 
DOROTHY SHIRES, Elementary Schools 
Assistant Supervisors 

LEE W. ADKINS, Veterans On-the-Farm 
Program 

CHARLES V. AKELEY, Finance and Re- 
search 

CHARLES C. CONLON, Jr.. Accreditation 
GEORGE M. CRAWFORD, Curriculum 
GENEVA F. ELY, Special Education 
HELEN D. GEORGE, Editor of Publica- 
tions 

GEORGE MYERS, School Lunch 

M. ELEANOR RICE, Certification 

ETHEL M. SAMMIS, Physical Education 
and Recreation 

CARROLL L. SPECK, Accreditation 
Counselor-Clerk 

EDWARD P. HAUHN 
Consultant Architect 

*F. J. THL^AN 
Auditor 

T. HOFMANN CLIFT 



Administrative Assistant I 

RUTH E. HOBBS 
Telephone Operator I 

MRS. WILDA R. TAYLOR 
Statisticians 

MRS. ANNE K. CARROLL, I 

MRS. RHEABEL J. JAFFE, I 

MRS. GENEVIEVE J. NEKERVIS, II 

MRS. ESTHER SCHWARTZMAN, II 

MRS. MARION F. WOLFF, II 
Principal Account Clerks 

MRS. GRACE STEELE TRAVERS, I 

MINNIE GERBER, II 

BLANCHE E. KEEN. II 
Senior Account Clerk 

MRS. MARY C. HOOVER 
Stenographer-Secretaries 

MARGARET E. ALBAUGH 

E. DRUSTLLA CHAIRS 

HELEN P. ELLIS 

ELSIE F. FORMAN 

CARRYE HAMBLUGER 

MRS. HELEN C. KATENKAMP 

ELIZABETH McGIN-NITY 
Senior Stenographers 

ALICE ALGIE 

MRS. RUTH D. ANTHONT 

BEVERLY L. BENNETT 

MARGARET C. BROOKS 

MRS. VIRGINIA B. COLE 

MRS. ZITA W. DANKER 

MRS. AN-NA E. KILNER 

MARY KULINSKI 

dolores r. prodoehl 
martha sappington 
jeannt: l. schreiber 
mrs. betty jean waggon'er 
mrs. martha m. west 
mrs. hazel b. wilkerson 

Senior Typists 

MRS. VIRGINIA C. COOPER 

MRS. HELEN M. REDEL 
Senior Clerk 

MRS. VERDA K. McCLOW 
Junior Clerks 

FLORENCE M. BRADY 

MRS. VIRGINIA E. SIHTO 

EDWIN S. STEWART 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore-l 



Director 

R. C. THOMPSON 

Supervisors 

LIONEL BURGESS. Case Services 
GEORGE W. KELLER, Ass't, Services for 
the Blind 

W. BIRD TERWILLIGER, Guidance. 
Placement and Training 



* Part time. 



Counselor 

MYRTLE E. CHELL, Tuberculosis Cases 
Medical Consultant 

*DEAN W. ROBERTS, M.D. 

2612 North Charles Street, Baltimore-18 
Stenographer-Secretary 

KATHLEEN E. SCHEVE 

Senior Stenographers 
ANN-E NUSINOV 
CHARLOTTE A. SYLVESTER 



3 



Branch Offices. Division of Vocational Rehabilitation 



Baltimore Branch 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore-1 

District Supervisor 

THOMAS D. BRAUN 
Rehabilitation Counselors 

ERNEST C. ALLNUTT. Jr. 

FOY L. LUNSFORD 

IRWIN D. MEDINGER 

RUTH F. RING 

WILLIAM H. SCHOENHAAR 

H. SMITH SHUMWAY 

JAMES D. SMYTH 

MRS. ELIZABETH B. SWISHER 
Stenographer-Secretary 

EMMA E. LUECKERT 
Senior Stenographers 

MILDRED R. ECK 

FRANCES PUSEY 

RENA STUL 
Receptionist-Clerk 

MRS. OLIVE MAYO 

Central Maryland Branch 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore-1 
District Supervisor 

R. KENNETH BARNES 
Rehabilitation Counselors 

B. W. BARKER 

MARTHA R. HARRISON 
Senior Stenographer 

BELL M. SKLAR 



Western Maryland Branch 

170 West Washington Street, Hasrerstown 

District Supervisor 

KENNETH G. STONER 

Rehabilitation Counselor 
tJ. LEO DELANEY 

Senior Stenographer 

MRS. ALFREDA E. COFFMAN 

Eastern Shore Branch 

109 Calvert Building. Salisbury 

District Supervisor 

RAYMOND H. SIMMONS 

Rehabilitation Counselor 
WILLIAM C. WALSH 

Senior Stenographer 

GLADYS E. GUTHRIE 

Southern Maryland Branch 

4313 Hamilton Street. Hyattsville 

District Supervisor 
MERL D. MYERS 

Rehabilitation Counselor 
HENRY D. DEVLIN 

Senior Stenographer 

MRS. JANE J. HOFFMAN 



t At 108 Washington Street, Cumberland 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore-1 



Director 

HELEN M. CLARK 
Supervisors 

MAE GRAHAM. School and Children's 
Libraries 

MRS. NETTIE B. TAYLOR, County and 
Institutional Libraries 
Counselors 

MRS. ELIZABETH McALLESTER, Tech- 
nical Counselor 

ANNE E. STURTEVANT, Readers' Coun- 
selor 
Librarians 

M. E. NAOMI JOHNSON, Associate 

JOSEPHINE M. BALDWIN, Senior As- 
sistant 



Stenographer-Secretary 

MRS. LAURA M. GAITHER 
Senior Stenographer 

MARTHA J. KEYDASH 
Junior Stenographer 

JOHANN NIZER 
Senior Clerk 

MRS. BEVERLY BURMEISTER 
Senior Typist 

JOYCE STOECKER 
Junior Typist 

GILDA ULISS 
C!erk-Messenger 
LOUIS EDWIN MYERS 



PRESIDENTS OF STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

EARLE T. HAWKINS Towson WTLL\\M E. HENRY Bowie 

LILLIAN C. COMPTON Frostburg MILES W. CONNOR. .Coppin, Baltimore-17 

J. D. BLACKWELL Salisbury 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

31 Light Street, Baltimore-2 



HOOPER S. MILES, State Treasurer, Chair- 
man 

J. MILLARD TAWES, State Comptroller 
THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr., State Supt. of 
Schools 

EDWIN W. BROOME, Supt. of Schools 

Montgomery County, Vice-chairman 
ALTHEA FULLER, Principal, Allegany 

County 



J. P. MANNION, Director 
THOMAS I. HAYES. Executive Secretary 
MINNIE HAMILTON, Stenographer-Secre- 
tarv 

HELEN M. KIRKMAN. Principal Clerk 
MRS. DOROTHY NEWTON. Accounting 

Machine Operator 
BERNADETTE DUFFY. Senior Typist 
MRS. ANETA RICHARDSON. Senior Clerk 



4 



MARYLAND COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS, DIRECTORS AND 
SUPERVISORS— JUNE 1951 



County Address 

ALLEGANY — Cumberland 
Superintendent 

CHARLES L. KOPP 

Assistant Superintendent 
RICHARD T. RIZER, High 

Director 

WILLIAM P. COOPER, Cafeterias 

Supervisors 

LEWYN C. DAVIS, Junior High 
JANE E. BOTSFORD, Elementary 
MILDRED WILLISON, Elementary 
WINIFRED GREENE, Primary 
JULIUS D. LONNHOLM. Vocational and 

Adult Education 
JACK E. PLATT, Music 
RALPH E. KESSLER, Special Education 
MRS. GLADYS MILLER EATON, Cafe- 
terias 

JOSEPH T. DOWNEY, Buildings and 
Grounds 

ARTHUR G. RAMEY. Transportation 
HOMER S. HIGGINS, Pupil Personnel 

ANNE ARUNDEI^Annapolis 
Superintendent 

DAVID S. JENKINS 

Supervisors 

HOWARD A. KINHART, Senior High 
RUTH V. DUDDERAR. Junior High 
MRS. DOROTHY S. KIRKLEY, Elemen- 
tary 

MRS. VIRGINIA D. MOORE, Elementary 
LEVIAH DANIEL, Elementary 
SARAH V. JONES. Colored Elementary 
FRANK C. GUNDERLOY, Vocational 
DORIS CLEMENTS. Home Economics 
R. HAROLD McCANN, Buildings 
MORRIS W. RANNELS. Planning and 

Purchasing 
JOSEPH H. PEPPER. Maintenance 
MRS. ELEANOR B. WARING. Pupil Per- 
sonnel 

B ALTIM O RE— Towson 
Superintendent 

EDWARD G. STAPLETON 

Assistant Superintendents 

J. A. SENSENBAUGH. Elementary 
JAMES B. OTOOLE. Jr.. High 

Director 

WILLIAM T. WILLIS. Jr.. Maintenance 
and Purchasing 

Supervisors 

C. JAMES VELIE. Music 
OLIVE JOBES. Art 

HERBERT R. STEINER, Physical Educa- 
tion and Health 
MARY E. KELLEHER. Home Economics 
RUTHETTA LIPPY. School Lunch 
L. KATHERYN DICE, Special Services 
THOMAS R. LAWRENCE, Music 
ANNA MEEKS, Guidance 
T. M. GREENE. Business Subjects and 

Adult Education 
JEAN C. SISK. High 
NORRIS A. KING, Junior High 
G. ALFRED HELWIG, High 
HELEN E. HALE, High 
JENNIE E. JESSOP. Elementary 
MYRTLE S. ECKHARDT. Elementary 



* Part time in this position. 



County Address 

ANNA G. SHEPPARD. Elementary 
DOROTHY V. BRANDT, Elementary 
M. KATHERINE DOST, Elementary 
MRS. PAULINE HOBBS. Colored Elemen- 
tary 

♦MINNIE H. WOOLFORD, Colored High 
ARTHUR A. DICK. Vocational 
EARL D. HEATH, Ass't, Transportation 
HERMAN C. BURTON, Pupil Personnel 

CALVERT — Prince Frederick 
Superintendent 

HARRY R. HUGHES 

Supervisors 

CARMEN DELAPLANE, Elementary and 
High 

MRS. THELMA O. CORNISH, Colored 

Elementary and High 
C. ELIZABETH REIG, Pupil Personnel 

CAROLINE— Denton 
Superintendent 
W. STEWART FITZGERALD 

Supervisors 

FRED G. USILTON. Jr.. High 
BEATRICE WILLIAMS. Elementary 
*MRS. LULA D. WARD, Colored Elemen- 
■ tary and High 

JAMES P. HILL, Pupil Personnel 
CARROLI^Westminster 
Superintendent 

SAMUEL M. JENNESS 

Supervisors 

JOHN F. WOODEN. Jr., High 
RUTH E. DeVORE, Elementary 
CHARLES E. RECK, Elementary 
♦PHILIP S. ROYER. Music 
MRS. JOSEPHINE WEST. Home Eco- 
nomics and Cafeterias 
*MAE E. PRINCE. Colored Elementary 
and High 

STUART WIDENER. Maintenance and 

Transportation 
MAYE E. GRIMES. Pupil Personnel 

CECIL— Elkton 
Superintendent 

WILLIAM S. SARTORIUS 

Supervisors 

EDWIN B. FOCKLER, High 
OLIVE L. REYNOLDS, Elementary 
PAUL S. HYDE. Elementary 
♦RACHEL E. BOYD, Home Economics 
EDWIN H. BARNES, Pupil Personnel 

CHARLES— La Plata 
Superintendent 
F. B. GWYNN 

Supervisors 

EMMA JEAN GERWIG, High 
B. LUCILE BOWIE, Elementary 
JOSEPH C. PARKS. Colored Elementary 
and High 

MRS. CECILIA E. FARRALL. Pupil Per- 
sonnel 

DORCHESTER— Cambridge 
Superintendent 

W. THEODORE BOSTON 

Supervisors 

ALBERT S. FARVER. Secondary 
EVELYN E. JOHNSON, Elementary 



5 



County Address 

MRS. VIOLA J. COMEGYS, Colored Ele- 
mentary and High 
JOHN T. COMER, Jr., Pupil Personnel 

FREDERICK— Frederick 
Superintendent 

EUGENE W. PRUITT 

Supervisors 
DUVAL W. SWEADNER, High 
MRS. LOUISE F. THOMPSON, Elemen- 
tary 

A. DRUCILLA WORTHINGTON, Ele- 
mentary 

WARREN R. EVANS, Physical Educa- 
tion and Health 
♦CHARLES C. T. STULL, Music 
*CPTARLES E. HENSON, Colored Ele- 
mentary and High 
RUTH MacVEAN, School Lunch 
PAUL HOFFM ASTER, Transportation 
GEORGE W. CULLER, Maintenance 
GERTRUDE SMITH, Pupil Personnel 

GARRETT— Oakland 
Superintendent 

R. BOWEN HARDESTY 

Supervisors 

FOSTER D. BITTLE, High 
MRS. CHARLOTTE E. BURRIER, Ele- 
mentary 

MRS. CAROLINE WILSON, Elementary 

OREN T. GRASER, Maintenance 

JOHN L. FITZWATER, Pupil Personnel 

HARFORD— Bel Air 

Superintendent 
CHARLES W. WILLIS 

Assistant Superintendent 

BENJAMIN S. CARROLL, High 

Supervisors 
DOROTHY A. MUDD, Junior High 
HAZEL L. FISHER, Elementary 
MRS. ANNE M. NOONAN, Elementary 
JOHN J. FISHER, Pupil Personnel 

HOWARD— Ellicott City 
Superintendent 

JOHN E. YINGLING 

Supervisors 

MARY L. ROCKWELL, High 
R. FRANCES HAMILTON, Elementary 
MORRIS L. WOODSON, Colored Elemen- 
tary and High 
HARRY T. MURPHY, Pupil Personnel 

KENT — Chestertown 
Superintendent 

READE W. CORR 

Supervisors 

G. WATSON ALGIRE, High 

LOUISE HEPBRON, Elementary 

♦MRS. SARA B. CHAMBERS, Colored 

Elementary 
MRS. MADELEINE FENISTELL. Pupil 

Personnel 

MONTGOMERY— Rockville 

Superintendent 

EDWIN W. BROOME 

Assistant Superintendent 

RICHARD E. CARPENTER, School Prop- 
erty 



Part time in this position. 



County Address 

Directors 

WILLIAM B. MARKS, Transportation 
ELEANOR L. SMITH, Personnel and Sta- 
tistics 

K. P. GRABARKIEWICZ, Maintenance 
GEORGE W. BARCEL, Custodial Services 

Supervisors 
MRS. FERN D. SCHNEIDER, High 
MRS. HELEN P. BREADY, High 
THOMAS W. PYLE, High 
MAXWELL E. BURDETTE, High 
WILLIAM B. EVANS, Elementary 
HANNAH F. HANWAY, Elementary 
ETHELEEN DANIEL, Elementary 
LILLIAN L. GORE, Elementary 
MARY L. GRAU, Elementary 
MRS. RUTH S. GUE. Elementary 
ALICE L. ROBINSON, Libraries 
MARJORIE BILLOWS, Art 
CRESENT J. BRIDE, Physical Education 
WILLIAM C. FEDDEMAN, Special Edu- 
cation 

JULIA W. WATKINS, Home Economics 

and Cafeterias 
C. MABLE SMITH, Curriculum 
MRS. LOUISE S. WALKER, Visual Aids 
EDWARD U. TAYLOR, Colored Elemen- 
tary and High 
T. H. OWEN KNIGHT, Pupil Personnel 

PRINCE GEORGE'S— Upper Marlboro 

Superintendent 
WILLIAM S. SCHMIDT 

Assistant Superintendent 

THOMAS S. GWYNN, Jr., School Plan- 
ning 

Supervisors 
JOHN P. SPEICHER, High 
ROWANETTA S. ALLEN, Junior High 
EUNICE E. BURDETTE, Elementary 
A. MILDRED HOYLE, Elementary 
MRS. CATHERINE T. REED. Elementary 
MRS. MARY B. WACKWITZ, Art 
MRS. MARY J. A. CAREY, Music 
ANGELA C. WEIXEL, Music 
MARY A. THOMPSON, Health Education 
VINCENT C. HOLOCHWOST, Physical 
Education 

ADA M. WARRINGTON, Physical Edu- 
cation 

EMMA BOWMAN, Elementary 
ELMER K. ZELLER, Industrial 
M. GLADYS DICKERSON, Home Eco- 
nomics and Adult Education 
ELEANOR G. WEAGLY, Cafeterias 
DOSWELL E. BROOKS, Colored Elemen- 
tary and High 
WILLIAM W. HALL, Assistant in Colored 
Schools 

JOHN W. HEIM, Transportation 
ARTHUR E. ROBINSON, Maintenance 
MARIAN E. LOBDELL, Pupil Personnel 

QUEEN ANNE'S— Centreville 
Superintendent 

FRANKLIN D. DAY 

Supervisors 

CARTER M. HICKMAN, High 
MRS. MARGARET S. STACK, Elementary 
MRS. LOLA P. BROWN, Colored Ele- 
mentary and Pupil Personnel 

ST. MARY'S— Leonardtown 
Superintendent 

LETTIE M. DENT 

Supervisors 
CAREY E. LACEY, High 
E, VIOLETTTE YOUNG. Elementary 



6 



County Address 
*MRS. MARGARET H. BURCH, Home 

Economics and School Lunch 
.RALPH S. WATERS, Colored Elementary 
HARRIET H. REEDER, Pupil Personnel 

SOMERSET— Princess Anne 
Superintendent 

C. ALLEN CARLSON 

Supervisors 

JOHN L. BOND, High 

MRS. ALICE MAE BEAUCHAMP, Ele- 
mentary 

KERMIT COTTMAN, Colored Elementary 
and High 

CHARLES O. BURNS. Jr., Pupil Person- 
nel 

TALBOT — Easton 
Superintendent 
'J. WILLARD DAVIS 

Supervisors 
ARTHUR R. HIGGINBOTTOM, High 
M. LILLIAN CHEEZUM, Elementary 
*W. H. FAUNTLEROY, Colored Elemen- 
tary and High 
MRS. VIRGINIA DARROW, Pupil Per- 
sonnel 

WASHINGTON— Hagerstown 

Superintendent 

WILLIAM M. BRISH 

Assistant Superintendent 
WILLIAM C. DIEHL 

Supervisors 

C. PAUL BARNHART, High 
WILBUR S. HOOPENGARDNER, Junior 
High 



* Part time in this position. 



County Address 

F. PAULINE BLACKFORD, Elementary 
KATHERINE L. HEALY, Elementary 
ANNE H. RICHARDSON, Elementary 
MIRIAM L. HOFFMAN, Music 
ALFRED ROTH, Industrial Arts 
CATHERINE L. BEACHLEY, Guidance 
MRS. ANORMALLEE WAY, Home Eco- 
nomics and School Lunch 
MARY E. BYER, Health 
EARL D. HUYETT. Buildings and 
Grounds 

RUSSELL KEPLER, Maintenance 
RICHARD MARTIN. Transportation 
JOSEPH H. VANCE, Finance 
WILBUR M. PHILLIPS. Pupil Personnel 

WICOMICO— Salisbury 

Superintendent 

JAMES M. BENNETT 

Supervisors 

LESTER A. HALL. High 
LOUISE MITCHELL. Elementary 
MARTHA R. JONES. Elementary 
MARIE A. DASHIELL. Colored Elemen- 

tary and High 
CHARLES E. TILGHMAN, Pupil Person- 
nel 

WORCESTER— Snow Hill 

Superintendent 

PAUL D. COOPER 

Supervisors 

WILLIAM L. KLINGAMAN. High 

MARY A. WARREN. Elementary 

MRS. ANNIE B. DOWNING. Colored 

Elementary 
MRS. LUCY S. PILCHARD, Pupil Per- 
sonnel 



7 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Letter of Transmittal 9 

Maryland School Building Program 10 

Legislation Affecting Education 13 

Notes from the Minutes of the State Board of Education 21 

Administrative Divisions of the State Department of Education: 

Instruction 26 

Vocational Education 33 

Certification and Accreditation 35 

Library Extension 39 

Vocational Rehabilitation 45 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools, Length of Session 50 

Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of Public and Nonpublic Schools 51 

Enrollment in Public and Nonpublic Schools 52 

Education for Handicapped Children, Schools for Atypical Children 55 

Births in Maryland 58 

Per Cent and Index of Attendance 60 

Grade Enrollment, Nonpromotions in Elementary Schools 63 

School Census, 1950 69 

High School Graduates: Number, Occupations, Colleges Attended 78 

High School Enrollment: by Year and Subject..: 88 

High School Failures and Withdrawals 102 

Teachers by Subject 108 

Super\isory and Pupil Personnel Services 109 

Clerks in Schools; Janitors, Utility Men, etc 110 

Parent-Teacher Associations Ill 

Teachers: by Certification, Sex, Summer School Attendance, Resignations, 

Turnover, Source 112 

Number Pupils Belonging, Average Salary per Teacher 129 

Number and Size of Schools 134 

Adult Education; Baltimore City Summer Schools 140 

High School Equivalence Examinations in Maryland 143 

Vocational Rehabilitation 144 

Costs of Maryland Schools: 

Total, Per Cent from State 146 

Distribution of Tax Dollar 150 

Cost per Pupil 152 

Salaries 158 

Vocational Program, Adult Education 160 

Transportation 164 

Capital Outlay, Bonded Indebtedness, Value of School Property 169 

County Levies, Assessments, Tax Rates 173 

State Individual Income Tax per Capita 180 

Per Capita Income by States and by Year in Maryland 181 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges; Junior Colleges 182 

Contributions of Teachers to State Teachers' Retirement System 190 

Library Extension, Aid to School Libraries 191 

State and County Health Program for School Children 194 

Financial Statements and Statistical Tables 196 

Index 242 



8 



Baltimore, Maryland 
January 1, 1952 

The Honorable Theodore R. McKeldin 
Government House 
Annapolis, Maryland 

Dear Governor McKeldin : 

In accordance with the provision of the laws of Maryland, 
I have the honor to present to you herewith, the eighty-fifth 
"annual report covering all operations of the State department 
of education and the support, conditions, progress and needs 
of education throughout the State" for the period beginning 
July 1, 1950 and ending June 30, 1951. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., 
Secretary-Treasurer 
State Board of Education 



9 



10 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



MARYLAND SCHOOL BUILDING PROGRAM 
(January 1, 1947 - June 30, 1951) 

At the close of World War II the counties and the City of Bal- 
timore embarked upon an extensive school building program in 
order to meet the needs of a rapidly growing pupil population 
caused by an unprecedented high birth rate and an abnormal 
rate of in-migration. While school building construction has 
always been considered a responsibility of the local political sub- 
divisions, it soon became apparent that additional financial as- 
sistance would be needed to meet the requirements. 

Maryland was one of the first states to make available a sub- 
stantial amount of financial assistance for this purpose. The 
General Assembly of 1949 enacted legislation making available 
a grant of $20,000,000 on a one-to-three matching basis with a 
limitation of §60 per pupil. The General Assembly of 1949 also 
created a State Loan Fund of $50,000,000 to enable the counties 
to borrow from the State for a 15-year period. As of June 30, 
1951, applications had been processed for $34,942,220 from this 
fund. 

During the period January 1, 1947 to June 30, 1951 the coun- 
ties and the City of Baltimore completed work on 208 different 
school buildings. Of this total amount of construction, 108 build- 
ings were additions, 21 were remodeled, 9 were additions plus 
remodeling, and 70 were entirely new buildings. 

Elementary school construction accounted for well over one- 
half of the total projects. Work was completed on 133 elemen- 
tary schools which provided facilities for 22,470 pupils. The 
major portion of these projects was in the densely -populated 
metropolitan area adjacent to the City of Baltimore and Wash- 
ington, D. C. Actually 89 buildings accommodating 16,860 pupils 
were built in these areas. 

Seventy-five projects were combined elementary-high or high 
schools providing facilities for 30,300 pupils. Two-thirds of these 
projects were in the metropolitan areas and accommodated 25,- 
020 pupils. 

In spite of this rapid expansion in school facilities, construc- 
tion was not keeping pace with the increasing enrollment. Con- 
sequently, as of June 30, 1951, an additional 105 projects were 
under construction in Baltimore City and the counties. These 
new projects were designed to provide 1,218 classrooms for 34,- 
356 pupils. In addition, 122 projects providing 1,259 classrooms 
for 39,570 pupils were in the preliminary planning stage. 

The school construction program in Maryland represents the 
outgrowth of long-range planning. The school superintendents 
of the State recognized the great need for additional school build- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



11 



ing facilities which followed the close of World War 11. Accord- 
ingly, in 1945 population studies were made in all of the counties 
to determine the needs for the next decade. While critical ma- 
terials were not available for school building construction during 
this period, most counties proceeded to plan buildings for con- 
struction during the post-war period. 

In order to assist the counties and the City of Baltimore in 
planning for these needed facilities the State made available 
funds for architects' fees. In most instances consultant services 
from recognized school building experts were utilized to check 
the accuracy of local planning. While the war retarded all of the 
emergency school building construction and, as a consequence, 
many of the counties and Baltimore City were confronted with a 
backlog of construction, many millions of dollars in savings were 
effected because plans and specifications were completed and 
many of the counties were ready for school building construction 
as soon as critical materials became available. 

In Maryland remarkable progress has been made. In the rural 
areas adequate facilities have been constructed or are in the 
process of construction. In the urban areas the problem of pro- 
viding adequate housing for the fast-growing school population 
remains critical despite the large number of projects completed 
or under construction. 



12 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



13 



LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION ENACTED BY THE 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND 

Regular Session — January 1951 

Allegany County — Board of Education 

Chapter 605, Senate Bill 249, of the Laws of 1951, amends Sections 
6 and 39 of Article 77 to increase the number of members of the Board 
of Education of Allegany County from three to five, of whom at least 
two shall be women, and of whom at least two shall be members of that 
political party which polled the second highest number of votes in the 
most recent gubernatorial election in the State, The terms of office 
of those persons who shall comprise the present Board of Education 
shall first expire before any appointments shall be made under the 
provisions of this Act. The terms of office of the members to be ap- 
pointed by the Governor as of June 1, 1951, under this Act, shall be 
designated so that the members of the Board of Education, as com- 
prised on June 1, 1951, shall have terms of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years, 
respectively, as of the first Monday in May of each year, one person 
to fill the vacancy of the member whose term is then expiring. 

The law further provides that in Allegany County each member of 
the Board of Education shall receive not more than $200,00 annually 
for traveling and other expenses. 

Allegany County — School Bus . 

Chapter 96, House Bill 91 of the Laws of 1951, provides that in 
Allegany County no school bus shall exceed its seating capacity by 
more than twenty-five per cent (259^~) in a bus with a center aisle, 
or by more than ten per cent (109f) in a bus without a center aisle. 
This limitation shall not apply within a mile radius of the school. On* 
and after June 1, 1951, all new school buses in Allegany County shall 
be of steel construction, shall have an outside mirror, and shall have 
the maximum seating capacity painted on the inside of the bus, over 
the windshield. 

This section shall apply to all motor vehicles used for the commer- 
cial transportation of school children in Allegany County, whenever 
they are operating exclusively for the purpose of transporting school 
children. 

Allegany County — Supplementary Payments to Retired Teachers 

Chapter 339, Senate Bill 428 of the Laws of 1951, adds a new sec- 
tion to Article I of the Code of Public Local Laws of Maryland (1930 
Edition) to increase the supplementary pension payments to retired 
teachers in Allegany County by $8 per month, if the County Commis- 
sioners determine to pay the same. The preceding section of this law 
provides for payments of $25 per month or less, the total retirement 
allowance not to exceed $150 per month. 

Anne Arundel County — School Budget 

Chapter 640, House Bill 421 of the Laws of 1951, states that the 
Anne Arundel County Board of Education, for the fiscal year of 1951 
only, shall be subject to the school budget law requirements with re- 
spect only to those funds levied by or belonging to the County, and 
said Board may accordingly expend other funds in addition to those 
provided in the regular Anne Arundel County school budget. 

Baltimore City — Parental School 

Chapter 496, House Bill 466 of the Laws of 1951, authorizes and em- 
powers the Mayor and City Council of Baltimore to acquire for the 



14 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



establishment, operation, and maintenance thereon for public parental 
school purposes, by gift, purchase, or condemnation, the properties 
situate in the First Election District of Baltimore County, fronting 
about 300 feet on the southerly side of Edmondson Avenue, Extended, 
and located approximately 3,450 feet west of Rolling Road, and con- 
taining about 2V2 acres of land. 

Baltimore City — School Bonds 

Chapter 9, Senate Bill 36 of the Laws of 1951, authorizes the Mayor 
and City Council of Baltimore, subject to the passage of an enabling 
ordinance by the qualified voters of Baltimore City, to issue up to 
$20,000,000 worth of bonds to finance acquisition of land or property, 
and to construct, improve, or extend the publiq schools in the city. 

Subject to the provisions of the Charter of Baltimore City relating to 
the Planning Commission, the Board of School Commissioners of Bal- 
timore City shall have final approval of all expenditures financed from 
the proceeds of the bond sale. 

Baltimore County — School Bonds 

Chapter 589, House Bill 671 of the Laws of 1951, amends Section 3 
of Chapter 644 of the Acts of 1949 to authorize and empower the County 
Commissioners of Baltimore County to borrow money to finance pub- 
lic facilities by the issuance of serial maturity bonds. 

No such debt shall be incurred and no such bonds shall be issued 
if the total par value of said bonds plus the sum of (1) the par value 
of all outstanding and unpaid bonds issued under this Act, and (2) the 
par value of all bonds of the County unissued but authorized under the 
authority of any Act prior to the year 1949, except bonds issued for 
the improvement of the Metropolitan District of Baltimore County by 
the Acts of 1924, shall exceed 7 per centum of the then assessed value 
of all real and personal property subject to assessment by said County. 

On and after January 1, 1951, no such debt shall be incurred and no 
such bonds shall be issued in any one fiscal year, except the refunding 
bonds authorized by Section 7 hereof, if the par value thereof shall 
exceed an amount equal to of one per centum of the then assessed 
value of all real and personal property subject to assessment, unless 
all such proposed bonds shall have been previously approved by a 
majority of the qualified voters at a referendum. 

Baltimore County — School Property 

Chapter 34, House Bill 214 of the Laws of 1951, provides that in 
addition to requiring the approval of the State Superintendent of 
Schools for all purchases, sales, construction (over $300) or remodel- 
ing of school land or buildings in Baltimore County, the County Board 
of Education must submit all such contracts, plans, acquisitions, and 
specifications for school land and buildings to the Chief Engineer of 
the Department of Public Works for his approval. 

The law further provides that in Baltimore County the title to all 
real property now held or hereafter acquired by the Baltimore County 
Board of Education shall be transferred to and vested in the County 
Commissioners of said county, who shall hold same for the use of the 
Board of Education. 

Whenever such property is no longer needed for school purposes in 
the judgment of the Board of Education of Baltimore County, the 
County Commissioners of Baltimore County may dispose of same at 
public sale. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



15 



Nothing in this section shall be construed to give the County Com- 
missioners of Baltimore County the authority to limit or abridge the 
existing authority now vested in the Board of Education of Baltimore 
County in its operation and administration of the public school system. 

Baltimore County — Supplementary Payments to Retired Teachers 

Chapter 65, Senate Bill 130 of the Laws of 1951, repeals and re-enacts 
Section 2D of Article 25 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1939 
Edition) relating to the payment of supplemental benefits to retired 
school teachers of Baltimore County. According to Chapter 667 of the 
Acts of 1949, Baltimore County was excluded from the provisions of 
this Act. The law, as re-enacted, includes Baltimore County among 
those counties which authorize the County Commissioners to pay to 
any school teacher in their county who is entitled to and who is receiv- 
ing any retirement benefits under the provisions of other laws with 
aggregate benefits of less than $100 per month, an additional sum not to 
exceed $25 per month provided that the total amount that he receives 
shall not exceed $100 per month. 

Caroline County — School Bonds 

Chapter 325, Senate Bill 371 of the Laws of 1951, authorizes the 
Board of County Commissioners of Caroline County to borrow a sum 
not exceeding $125,000 for the construction, improvement, renovation, 
alteration, repair, and equipping of new and existing school buildings 
in said county. 

The law further empowers the Board of Education of Caroline County 
to enter into all the contracts necessary to the execution and comple- 
tion of said projects. 

Cecil County — School Bonds 

Chapter 475, Senate Bill 471 of the Laws of 1951, authorizes and 
empowers the County Commissioners of Cecil County to borrow a sum 
not to exceed $250,000 by the issuance and sale of coupon bonds, for 
the purpose of erecting, equipping, and adding to school buildings. 

The Incentive Fund for school buildings, received from the State of 
Maryland, shall be used to pay the interest on said bonds, and to re- 
deem them as they mature. If the Incentive Fund is not sufficient for 
the aforesaid purpose, then the County Commissioners shall pay the 
deficit out of the General Funds of the County or shall levy sufficient 
taxes to pay said deficit. 

Cecil County — Supplementary Payments to Retired Teachers 

Chapter 163, House Bill 423 of the Laws of 1951, amends Section 
103 A of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1939 Edition) 
to include Cecil County in the list of counties authorized to pay to any 
school teacher who is retired and receives benefits less than $100.00 
per month, an additional sum not to exceed $25.00 a month, provided 
that the total amount received shall not exceed $100.00 per month. 

Charles County — Board of Education 

Chapter 535, Senate Bill 303 of the Laws of 1951, amends Sections 
6 and 39 of Article 77 (1939 Edition and 1947 Supplement) to increase 
the number of members of the Charles County Board of Education 
from three to five. The members of said Board on June 1, 1951, shall 
continue to hold their offices for the terms for which appointed, and as 
of that day the Governor shall appoint 2 additional members of said 
Board, to serve until the first Monday in May in the year 1957. Each 



16 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



member of the Charles County Board of Education shall receive com- 
pensation at the rate of $250.00 annually. 

Charles County — School Bonds 

Chapter 225, Senate Bill 300 of the Laws of 1951, repeals Chapter 
270 of the Acts of 1949 and authorizes the County Commissioners of 
Charles County to borrow an amount not to exceed $500,000 for the 
purpose of constructing new school buildings, improving and making 
additions to existing buildings, and equipping school buildings in 
Charles County. 

Defective Delinquents 

Chapter 476, House Bill 12 of the Laws of 1951, provides for the 
establishment of an institution for defective delinquents at Jessups, 
Maryland, to be known as the Patuxent Institution and to be within the 
general administrative control of the Board of Correction. The Act 
further delineates the powers, duties, and organization of said Insti- 
tution, defining defective delinquents, and providing generally for the 
establishment of the presence of defective delinquency in any person, 
the indeterminate confinement of such persons and their possible parole 
or release; and defining generally the powers and duties of the Board 
and Department of Correction as to the said Institution and the powers 
and duties of the Institution and its several subdivisions. 

Dorchester County — School Bonds 

Chapter 517, House Bill 715 of the Laws of 1951, repeals Chapter 
308 (Acts of 1949) and Chapter 42 (Acts of 1950). The bill authorizes 
the County Commissioners of Dorchester County to issue and sell at 
one time or from time to time its negotiable promissory notes, certifi- 
cates of indebtedness, or bonds for an amount not to exceed $3,000,000 
at a rate of interest not to exceed 4 per cent per annum, for the pur- 
pose of erecting school buildings, purchasing land for school buildings, 
altering, repairing, and equipping school buildings in Dorchester 
County, or for matching Federal funds for such purposes. 

The law further specifically states the respective areas in which 4 of 
the new schools shall be built. 

Frederick County — Supplementary Payments to Retired Teachers 

Chapter 440, House Bill 745 of the Laws of 1951, adds a new section 
to Article 25 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1939 Edition and 
1947 Supplement) to include Frederick County in the list of those 
counties authorized to pay an additional $8.00 each month to eligible 
retired teachers. This sum is in addition to the $25.00 previously au- 
thorized (1949), but the total of such retirement payments shall not 
exceed $100.00 per month. 

Garrett County — Natural Gas Tax 

Chapter 265, Senate Bill 115 of the Laws of 1951, provides for the 
levying of a 7 per cent distribution and production tax on natural gas 
or other gas taken from the earth or waters in Garrett County. The 
tax shall be the liability of the producer and purchaser of gas in the 
following proportions: the producer shall be liable for 60 per cent of 
the tax and the purchaser shall be liable for 40 per cent of the tax. 

The fund accumulated from the levying of said tax shall be paid 
out in the following order: (1) 15 per cent of the receipts received 
frqm gas produced within the corporate limits of any incorporated 
town in Garrett County shall be paid to corporate officials of said town; 
<2) the first $50,000 of the receipts each year shall be used towards the 



Maryland State Department of Education 



17 



liquidation of the present indebtedness of Garrett County for public 
school building purposes; (3) the next $25,000 shall be used to maintain 
the Garrett County Memorial Hospital; (4) the balance, if any, of said 
receipts each year shall be placed in a new school building, repair, 
and/ or addition fund to be expended by the County Commissioners and 
the Board of Education of Garrett County as they may deem expedient, 
subject to the approval of the State Superintendent of Schools. 

Harford County — Supplementary Payments to Retired Teachers 

Chapter 422, House Bill 646 of the Laws of 1951, authorizes and 
directs the County Commissioners of Cecil and Harford Counties to 
pay to each teacher of said counties who has been retired on a pension 
of less than $600.00 per year, an additional amount sufficient to make 
the total payments to said teacher equal $600.00 and are authorized 
and directed to levy a sufficient sum each year to pay such increased 
pensions. Provided, however, that in Harford County no person who 
has not qualified to receive the compensation provided for in this sec- 
tion prior to June 1, 1951, shall be permitted to qualify for such addi- 
tional compensation on or after June 1, 1951. 

The County Commissioners of Frederick, Harford, and Kent Coun- 
ties are authorized and directed to pay to each teacher of said counties 
who has been retired on pension and who receives less than $100.00 
per month, an additional $25.00 per month, but in no event shall any 
payments be made to any teacher which will make the payments more 
than $100.00 per month. Provided, however, that in Harford County 
no person who has not qualified to receive the compensation provided 
for in this section prior to June 1, 1951, shall be permitted to qualify 
for such additional compensation on or after June 1, 1951. 

High School Equivalence 

Chapter 39, Senate Bill 21 of the Laws of 1951, amends Section 
191 A of Article 77 (1947 Supplement) to include residents on a Fed- 
eral reservation within the State of Maryland among those who may 
obtain a high school equivalence certificate by passing an examination 
provided by the State Board of Education. 

Howard County — School Bonds 

Chapter 286, Senate Bill 119 of the Laws of 1951, authorizes the 
County Commissioners of Howard County to borrow an amount not 
to exceed $700,000 for the purpose of constructing and equipping a 
high school for white children at Jonestown, in Howard County, and the 
acquisition of lands necessary therefor. 

The form and tenor of the bonds issued for such indebtedness, along 
with the method of sale, and the rate of interest shall be prescribed by 
the County Commissioners of Howard County; provided, however, that 
the rate of interest shall not exceed 4 per cent per annum. 

Mentally and Physically Handicapped Children, Increased Allowance for 

Chapter 533, Senate Bill 269 of the Laws of 1951, amends Section 
229 of Article 77, to provide for the appropriate instruction of physi- 
cally and /or mentally handicapped children in approved educational 
institutions if no provision for the instruction of such children has been 
made by the local board of education. This bill provides for the reim- 
bursement to the Board of Education in the City of Baltimore or the 
county in which the parents of such physically and /or mentally han- 
dicapped children may reside, of an amount not to exceed $600 per 
school year for each mentally and /or physically handicapped child re- 
ceiving instruction in an approved school within or outside of the State 
of Maryland. 



18 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



Mentally and Physically Handicapped Children, Withdrawal of 

Chapter 319, Senate Bill 335 of the Laws of 1951, amends Section 
212 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1947 Supple- 
ment), which is the existing attendance law, to provide for the with- 
drawal from school of mentally or physically handicapped children for 
whom further attendance would be impractical. In such case the Su- 
perintendent of Schools of the particular county or of Baltimore City 
may permit the withdrawal of any such pupil who has reached the age 
of 14 years, and who, in the judgment of such person, can no longer 
profit from further continuance in school. 

Merit System — Vocational Rehabilitation 

Chapter 66, Senate Bill 136 of the Laws of 1951, authorizes the Em- 
ployment Commissioner to prepare special lists of eligibles, without 
examination, of persons certified by the Division of Vocational Rehabili- 
tation to be physically able and adequately trained to qualify for a 
position in the Classified Service. The appointing authority at its 
option may use such special lists of eligibles, and require the persons 
named thereon to waive any right or benefit from any State Pension 
System and/or any disability benefits. 

Montgomery County — Board of Education, Election of 

Chapter 364, House Bill 181 of the Laws of 1951, repeals and re- 
enacts with amendments Section 6 of Article 77, removing Montgomery 
County from the provision of said section. The law provides that after 
January 1, 1952,* the County Board of Education of Montgomery 
County shall be composed of 7 members, qualified voters of said County, 
who shall be chosen as follows: one from each of the 5 council dis- 
tricts and 2 at large, and who shall serve as hereinafter provided in 
this section, provided, however, that the offices now held by the mem- 
bers of the Board of Education on the effective date of this Act are 
abolished and the incumbents exercising the functions and duties 
thereof on such date shall hold office under the provisions of this Act 
until their respective successors shall have been elected and qualified. 

The law further lists qualifications for candidates and prescribes the 
manner and method of nomination and election to a position on the 
Montgomery County Board of Education. The law also delineates the 
powers and duties of the Board of Education. 

It is further enacted that before the provisions of this Act shall be- 
come effective, the County Council and the Board of Election Super- 
visors of Montgomery County shall submit the questions of "For or 
Against a Non-Partisan Elective School Board" to the qualified voters 
of said County on the Tuesday after the first Monday in November, 
1951. If the majority of the voters vote "Against" then this Act shall 
be null and void. 

If the Vote is "For," the members of the appointed School Board 
shall serve as interim members of the elected board. The member 
whose appointed term would have expired in May of 1952 shall serve 
until January 1, 1953; the members whose terms would have expired 
in 1953 and 1954 respectively, shall serve until January 1, 1953; the 
remaining members shall serve until January 1, 1955. The interim 
incumbent may be a candidate for election under this Act. Four mem- 
bers of the County Board of Education shall be elected at the general 
election to be held in November, 1952. Said members shall take office 
January 1, 1953 and serve for 2 years. 



* Interpretation of the Bill in its entirety indicates that this date should be January 
I, 1958. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



19 



At the general election in November 1954 seven members shall be 
elected to the Board of Education for Montgomery County as shall be 
the case at the general elections every 4 years thereafter. 

Oyster Farming — High School Conservation Studies 

Chapter 602, Senate Bill 160 of the Laws of 1951, authorizes the 
Department of Tidewater Fisheries to set aside for each Tidewater 
County public high school not more than 5 acres of submerged barren 
tidewater lands to be used for the sole purpose of experimental oyster 
farming or for the cultivation of other shellfish in conjunction with 
regular scholastic conservation studies. Said high schools may use 
modern methods of planting, harvesting, or marketing the fishery prod- 
ucts so cultivated without regard to any restrictive provisions. If after 
3 years the subject school has not used the barren lands for their 
studies, or if the studies are discontinued, the lands shall revert to the 
State. 

All the acreage now in use by the high school students of Calvert 
County shall continue under their custody under the provisions of this 
bill. 

St. Mary's Seminary Junior College 

Chapter 626, Senate Bill 479 of the Laws of 1951, authorizes the cre- 
ation of a State debt in the aggregate amount of $B00,000, the pro- 
ceeds thereof to be used for the purpose of erecting and equipping a 
new building or buildings at St. Mary's Seminary Junior College at 
St. Mary's City, and providing generally for the issue and sale of Cer- 
tificates of Indebtedness evidencing such loan. 

Scholarships — Baltimore County and Third Legislative District of Baltimore 
City 

Chapter 607, Senate Bill 293 of the Laws x>f 1951, amends Section 
254, Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1947 Supplement), 
treating of the awarding of free scholarships to certain Maryland col- 
leges, to provide that all such scholarships awarded for Baltimore 
County and for the Third Legislative District of Baltimore City shall 
be awarded by the Dean of Admissions, the Committee on Admissions, 
or the appropriate authorities of the institution concerned, taking into 
consideration the financial position of the parents or guardians as pro- 
vided hereinabove. 

Scholarships — Washington College 

Chapter 227, Senate Bill 302 of the Laws of 1951, amends Section 
2, Chapter 542, Acts of 1910, to permit female as well as male students 
from the Western Shore to be granted Senatorial scholarships to Wash- 
ington College. 

School Sites, Leasehold Interest in 

Chapter 379, House Bill 344 of the Laws of 1951, repeals and re- 
enacts with amendments. Section 46 of Article 77 of the Annotated 
Code of Maryland (1939 Edition). The law provides that the county 
board of education may receive donations of school grounds or school 
sites, or of houses already built suitably located and adapted to school 
purposes, but in no case shall any site be built upon, or any house 
occupied, until a good and sufficient title or leasehold of a term suffi- 
cient to outlast the probable useful life of any building to be erected 
thereon has been obtained for the same in the corporate name of the 
Board. 



20 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



Somerset County — Board of Education 

Chapter 542, Senate Bill 379 of the Laws of 1951, amends Section 6 
of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1939 Edition), to 
increase the number of members on the Somerset County Board of 
Education from six to seven, and to direct that the additional member 
shall be appointed from Smith's Island. 

Somerset County — School Building Fund 

Chapter 628, Senate Bill 489 of the Laws of 1951, repeals Sections 
3 and 7 of Chapter 698 of the Acts of 1949 and amends Section 6 of 
said Act. The law provides that all monies used in Somerset County 
under the provisions of this Act shall be expended only for construction 
or other capital improvements of the public school buildings in said 
County, for the purchase and acquisition of furniture and equipment 
for said public school buildings, and for the purchase of land for such 
school buildings. Provided, however, that in the allocation of the said 
monies the sum of at least $204,150 shall be expended for such purposes 
at the colored school in Crisfield, and the sum of at least $204,150 
shall be expended at the colored school in Princess Anne. 

Vocational Rehabilitation Division — Reports of, Use as Evidence 

Chapter 697, House Bill 461 of the Laws of 1951, states that no re- 
port, record, or memorandum of the Division of Vocational Rehabilita- 
tion of the State Department of Education, or the action taken by, or 
the findings of, that Division shall be referred to in any way or be 
received as evidence in any civil proceeding before any Commission, 
administrative body, or Court. 

Washington and Frederick Counties — Supplementary Payments to Retired 
Teachers 

Chapter 481, House Bill 247 of the Laws of 1951, repeals and re- 
enacts Chapter 745 of the Acts of 1949. The law states that any per- 
son who shall have been a teacher in the public schools of this State 
for an aggregate period of 25 years or more prior to June 1, 1927, and 
who, in the case of Caroline County shall have been a teacher for a 
period of 20 years or more prior to June 1, 1927; and who, in the case 
of Washington and Frederick Counties, shall have been a teacher, day 
or night, or substitute; or a clerk, whether at the same time or dif- 
ferent times, for a period of 20 years or more prior to July 1, 1931, 
and who shall be ineligible for a pension under this sub-title; and who 
shall be at least 60 years of age; and whose record as a teacher shall be 
without reproach; and who shall be unable to teach because of physical 
disability shall receive a pension of $720.00 per annum from the County 
Commissioners of the county in which he has taught. 

But in Washington County, the County Commissioners are directed 
to pay a pension of $50.00 a month to any such teacher who shall have 
taught for more than 20 and up to 25 years, and $60.00 a month to any 
such teacher who shall have taught for 25 years or more. 

Wicomico County — School Bonds 

Chapter 224, Senate Bill 299 of the Laws of 1951, repeals Chapter 
58 of the Acts of 1950 and authorizes the County Commissioners of 
Wicoimico County to borrow an amount not to exceed $700,000 at a 
rate of interest not to exceed 4 per cent per annum, for which coupon 
bonds shall be issued in the denomination of $1,000. 

The proceeds derived from the sale of said bonds shall be used by 
the Board of Education of Wicomico County for the construction, im- 
provement, and equipment of schools in or near Salisbury, Maryland. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



21 



NOTES FROM THE MINUTES OF THE STATE BOARD OF 
EDUCATION 
September 11, 1950 

The President of the State Board of Education and the State 
Superintendent of Schools invited the members of the Board, in 
groups of two, to participate in making the State budgets as fol- 
lows: State Department of Education, Distribution of State 
School Funds, Teachers Colleges. The groups will rotate froni 
year to year in order that all members of the Board may become 
famihar with all the budgets. 

November 30, 1950 
Mr. Jerome Framptom, Jr., new member of the State Board, 
was introduced by Dr. Pullen. Mr. Framptom had previously 
been President of the Caroline Board of Education. 

Dr. Pullen reported that he had talked with the Attorney 
General regarding the salaries of the Assistant Superintendents 
and had found that the approval of the Standard Salary Board is 
necessary. Dr. Pullen stated that he plans to continue working 
with the Standard Salary Board on these salaries and also on a 
revision of the salaries of the rest of the State Department em- 
ployees. 

At the unanimous request of the county superintendents and 
upon recommendation of the State Superintendent, the Board 
passed the following By-law with regard to the minimum age for 
entrance to the first grade in the county schools : 

Every child admitted to the first grade in a public elementary 
school in a Maryland county shall be at least six years of age on or 
before December 31 of the year in which he applies for entrance. 

Upon the advice of the Attorney General and the recom- 
mendation of the State Superintendent, the Board passed the 
following By-law providing for leave of absence for the perform- 
ance of military service: 

It shall be the policy of the State Board of Education to grant, 
upon request, leave of absence for the performance of military serv- 
ice on the part of any employee of the State Department of Educa- 
tion or of the State Teachers Colleges. 

The question was raised as to whether any move had been 
made to increase the minimum State salaries for teachers, which, 
in view of the present and immediately prospective increase in 
cost of living over 1947, when the salary scale was adopted, are 
and will be inadequate. Dr. Pullen reported that the problem is 
being studied, since high costs are beginning to have an effect. 
A number of counties are considering local increases. 

Concern was also expressed about the adequacy of the pres- 
ent Incentive Fund in financing the public school building pro- 



22 



EightV-Fifth Annual Report 



gram. It was decided that a committee be formed to explore 
school construction needs in each county and in Baltimore City 
and in the light of these data to recommend methods of financing 
a public school building program that will insure satisfactory 
classrooms for all children. This committee was to be composed 
of several board members, several local school superintendents, 
one or more persons designated by the State Superintendent, and 
the State Superintendent. 

February 27, 1951 

Dr. Pullen reported that in accordance with a resolution ap- 
proved by the State Board at its last meeting a committee had 
met and discussed the two problems assigned to it — the need for 
State aid for school construction and teachers' salaries. 

At the Committee meeting it was reported that the counties 
and Baltimore City need new school construction which will cost 
between $125,000,000 and $140,000,000. The counties and Balti- 
more City have a remaining borrowing capacity of about $80,- 
000,000. In view of the limited borrowing power of the political 
subdivisions and the urgent need to provide classrooms for 115,- 
000 more children during the next few years, the Committee 
recommended that the State make a grant of $35,000,000 at the 
rate of $100 per pupil and increase the Incentive Fund by $5 per 
child to each of the political subdivisions. 

The Committee unanimously recommended that the salary 
schedule be raised by $500 ''across the board" ; that is, that the 
beginning State minimum for teachers with degrees be $2,700 
and the maximum $4,300, with annual increments of $100. 

The State Board of Education went on record as favoring 
increasing the State minimum salary schedule of teachers by 
$500. The Board also went on record as favoring increasing the 
Incentive Fund for School Buildings in the amount of $5 per 
pupil. 

The State Superintendent informed the Board that he had 
been thinking for some time that it would be wise to give leaves 
of absence to different members of the staff to enable them to 
devote themselves to some activity which would mean that they 
would return to their tasks with renewed vigor and fresh points 
of view. He will develop this idea later. At this time, he re- 
quested permission of the Board to grant Mr. Paul E. Huffington, 
Supervisor of Colored Schools, leave of absence with pay, to 
travel through the South and observe Negro education in that 
area. The Southern Education Foundation is considering offer- 
ing a travel fellowship worth approximately $2,000 fo Mr. Huff- 
ington for this purpose. The fellowship and leave will extend 
over a period of from sixty to ninety days. The Board approved 
Mr. Huffington's leave, as requested. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



23 



Upon recommendation of Dr. Pullen, the Board formally ap- 
proved moving the quarters of the State Department of Educa- 
tion from the Mathieson Building to the old Sun Building, on the 
corner of Charles and Baltimore Streets. The address of the new 
office is 2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

The State Superintendent then mentioned the fact that the 
former Coppin Teachers College, which has this year been taken 
over by the State Board of Education, has operated under the 
above name for some years and since there is sentiment in con- 
nection with the name, he recommended that the official name 
of the institution be the Coppin State Teachers College at Balti- 
more. The Board approved this action. 

May 29, 1951 

Dr. Tasker G. Lowndes and Dr. Nicholas Orem were re- 
elected President and Vice-president of the Board, respectively. 

Dr. Pullen reported that the Southern Education Foundation 
has granted a traveling fellowship to Mr. Paul E. Huffington, 
who will observe Negro education throughout the South. The 
Board had previously approved granting Mr. Huffington leave for 
this activity. He will be away from his usual assignments for 
approximately sixty days. 

Upon recommendation of Dr. Pullen the Board passed the 
following resolution on the late Dr. Thomas C. Ferguson, Super- 
visor of Physical Education and Recreation: 

Resolution 

In the untimely death of Dr. Thomas C. Ferguson, on March 
16, 1951, the Maryland schools have lost a wise and dynamic leader 
in the field of physical education and recreation. 

After completing undergraduate work at the University of South 
Dakota, Dr. Ferguson received his master's degree from Harvard 
and in 1941 qualified for his doctorate at George Washington Uni- 
versity. Because of his grasp of the problems in his special field, he 
rose to top leadership in many State and national organizations 
which were concerned with physical education and recreation. 

Dr. Ferguson was appointed the first State Supervisor of Physi- 
cal Education and Recreation in Maryland in 1937, after a five-year 
period as the State Field Leader in charge of programs in the Mary- 
land public schools, under the leadership of Dr. William Burdick of 
the Playground Athletic League. 

In 1942 Dr. Ferguson returned to active duty in the Army and 
was assigned as Special Reserve Officer at Fort George G. Meade. 
In the summer of 1943 he went to the South Pacific as the War Bond 
Officer for that area, and the following year he returned to civilian 
life and resumed his duties with the State Department of Education. 

Dr. Ferguson not only helped establish and improve a staff of 
trained teac^hers of physical education in Maryland public schools 



24 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



but co-ordinated the efforts of educators and the medical profession 
in securing an excellent health program for Maryland school children. 

The Board wishes to express its sorrow at the loss of Dr. Fer- 
guson and its deep sympathy for his widow. 

Dr. Pullen recommended that in view of the present and 
prospective shortage of qualified teachers the Board authorize 
him to issue War Emergency Certificates for the school year 
1951-52. The Board took favorable action. 

At the request of the Board Dr. Pullen reviewed the efforts 
of the last five months to increase the minimum State salary 
schedule for teachers. He reminded the Board that as late as 
October and in the early part of November he had not thought 
it would be necessary to ask the Legislature for an increase in 
the minimum State salary schedule for teachers. However, dur- 
ing the latter part of November and the month of Decemloer it 
was impressed upon him by school officials, teachers, and lay 
people that some adjustment would have to be made in order to 
retain teachers, as salaries had not kept pace with living costs 
and the inflationary trend. Dr. Pullen commented further that 
at a meeting of the State Board on November 30, 1950, he was 
instructed to appoint a Committee composed of members of the 
Board, school officials, and lay people to study the matter of State 
aid for teachers' salaries and for school buildings. This group 
was appointed. Simultaneously, other groups, including the 
Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers, the Teachers Asso- 
ciation, school officials, and lay people, began to study the prob- 
lem also and they made recommendations that the minimum sal- 
ary schedule be raised $500 "across the board." The State Board 
of Education on February 27, 1951 officially approved the recom- 
mendations of its Committee which made the same recommenda- 
tions as the other group. 

Dr. Pullen stated that on December 28, 1950 he had written 
Governor-elect McKeldin, calling attention to the urgency of the 
situation and asking for an appointment to discuss the matter. 
On January 19, 1951 he and Dr. Tasker G. Lowndes, President 
of the State Board of Education, had a conference with the Gov- 
ernor in Annapolis and talked over the problem with him. At this 
time Dr. Lowndes informed the Governor that he was issuing 
immediately a strong statement about the shortage of teachers 
and the imperative need for State aid for salary increases. 

In accordance with the procedure prescribed by law, the ac- 
tion of the Board in approving the $500 increase for teachers was 
incorporated into bills and presented to the Governor, the Presi- 
dent of the Senate, and the Speaker of the House, about the mid- 
dle of February 1951. The Governor took the stand publicly that 
teachers* salaries are a local problem and that the State was not 
responsible for them. The General Assembly, however, late in 



Maryland State Department of Education 



25 



the session, by an overwhelming majority, passed a bill increas- 
ing the salary schedule all along the line by $300 per teacher and 
provided the money through an increase in corporation taxes. 
The Governor vetoed the bill, which by constitutional require- 
ment will be the first order of business when the Legislature re- 
convenes. 

Upon being informed that no increase in salaries had been 
provided for the staffs of the Teachers Colleges, it was decided to 
appoint a committee of the State Board to study the question 
of a new salary scale for the teachers in these institutions. 

Dr. Pullen requested that the Board authorize him to ap- 
point an advisory committee to study the program of Special 
Education. He had already been authorized by the State Board 
to employ experts to study the possibilities in this field. The 
Board approved his appointing such a committee. 

Upon Dr. Pullen's recommendation, the Board granted per- 
mission to destroy records of closed cases in the Division of Re- 
habilitation after these records have been microfilmed. 

The Board approved the appointment of Miss Eleanor G. 
Weagly, Supervisor of School Lunch, effective August 1, 1951, 
to replace Mrs. Gertrude Bowie Marsh who resigned June 15, 
1951. Mr. WilHam L. Klingaman was appointed Assistant Super- 
visor in Accreditation, effective August 1, 1951, and Mr. Carroll 
Lee Speck, Assistant Supervisor in Accreditation, effective June 
16, 1951. 

Upon recommendation of the State Superintendent, the 
Board approved the request of the Student Government Associa- 
tion at the State Teachers College at Towson that it be allowed 
to sponsor another foreign student at the college next year. A 
similar experiment last year was successful. A student will be 
selected through the International Institute of Education of New 
York, a private agency endorsed by the Department of State, and 
the funds for maintenance at the College will be provided by the 
Student Government Association. 



26 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF INSTRUCTION 

The program of the Division of Instruction, reflecting devel- 
opments in the counties of the State, revolved largely around five 
major areas of study and activity: (1) the continued develop- 
ment of the general education program ; (2) the use in the pro- 
gram of all the arts — language arts, graphic and visual arts, 
music arts, the art of critical thinking, and the practical or tech- 
nical arts — as the means of achieving educational ends; (3) the 
use in the program of all kinds of community resources — agency 
and institutional resources, natural resources, and individuals 
with special lore or competence — to assure rich and valid learn- 
ing; (4) the better adaptation of the program for individual dif- 
ferences, particularly for those with differences so extreme and 
individual as to require professional diagnosis and treatment; 
and (5) continued stress on the study of the processes of human 
development (including child study) as the major aspect of the 
in-service teacher education program. 

The General Education Program 

The curriculum development movement which was launched 
in 1945 when twenty of the twenty-three counties of the State 
began building junior high school programs, continued vigor- 
ously throughout this year. Workshop and teacher education 
activities were on the regional, county, and local levels and were 
directed at the extension into grades seven, eight, and nine of 
curriculum patterns, flexible in-class groupings, diversification 
of materials, techniques of teaching fundamental skills, and 
teacher qualifications found effective in the elementary school. 
The work-conference type of meeting was held in most counties 
at intervals throughout the year or at sometime during the sum- 
mer months. Members of the staff of the State Department of 
Education were in almost constant service to these programs. 

Summer conferences were held in Anne Arundel, Baltimore, 
Charles, Frederick, Garrett, Harford, Kent, Prince George's 
Queen Anne's, St. Mary's, and Wicomico counties and at the 
State Teachers College at Bowie. The length of these conferences 
ranged from several days to six weeks in Garrett County where 
a Child Study Institute was held. Although in general these con- 
ferences related to the junior high school, with emphasis upon 
the general education program as a continuation of the elemen- 
tary program in the first six grades, some of the counties began 
working on the senior high school subjects and attacking the 
problem of high school constants as the extension into the senior 
high school of the general education program beginning in grade 
one. 

The Arts in the General Education Program 

Early in the 1930's, the State Department of Education is- 
sued a bulletin on Goals in Social Studies for Primary Grades I- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



27 



///. This bulletin sought in its introduction to identify all the var- 
ious kinds of activities by means of which educational goals are 
achieved. Using these as a base in 1950-1951 the Division of 
Instruction, in its own regional and Divisional meetings and 
in conferences in the counties, began to demonstrate that all the 
arts have appropriate places and functions in the general educa- 
tion program. In the past, secondary schools have relied pre- 
dominantly on language arts activities for the achievement of 
objectives. Pupils have read and have written and talked about 
problems and conditions and have used the fine and practical arts 
only incidentally and occasionally. 

The Division this year set itself the task of developing lan- 
guage arts programs throughout the State in a detailed and sys- 
tematic manner and aimed to have every school child reading on 
the level of his own potentiality within a period of five years. In 
September, 1950, at a professional conference of the county 
superintendents of schools, held at the State Department of 
Education, Dr. Emmett A. Betts, head of the Reading Clinic of 
Temple University, outlined the content and procedure of the 
program. In the conferences of all county supervisors which fol- 
lowed, one at Bowie and one at Towson State Teachers College, 
Dr. Betts, Mr. Thomas J. Edwards, and others of his clinical 
staff demonstrated the techniques of inventorying the present 
status of pupils in reading competence and the level of teacher 
performance. Subsequently, two-day regional conferences were 
held at Towson, Coppin, Frostburg, and Salisbury State Teachers 
Colleges. Mrs. Marjorie S. Johnson or Mr. Edwards of the clini- 
cal staff was present to instruct the supervisors of the State and, 
on occasion, representative teachers how to construct the Indi- 
vidual Reading Inventory (IRI). The State Department of Edu- 
cation began also in an experimental way to give financial assist- 
ance to counties which operated county programs to extend and 
implement the efforts of the State. 

The Division of Instruction continued also its program de- 
signed to extend and enrich the music arts experiences of pupils 
in the general education program. In 1949-1950, Dr. James L. 
Mursell of Teachers College, Columbia University, on the invita- 
tion of the Department, had made a survey of music programs 
and activities in county schools. In his report to the Department, 
he had recommended the kinds of music experiences all children 
should have in the primary, intermediate, junior high, and senior 
high school grades; kinds of programs which should be devel- 
oped; necessary competencies of teachers; and the responsibili- 
ties of teacher education institutions. For its first follow-up ef- 
forts, the Division of Instruction obtained the services of Dr. 
Lilla Belle Pitts of Columbia University. At the professional con- 
ference of the county superintendents in September and in one- 
day work conferences held at Towson, Bowie, Salisbury, and 



28 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



Frostburg- State Teachers Colleges, Dr. Pitts demonstrated the 
nature of effective in-service teacher education programs. These 
conferences were not primarily for purposes of discussion. They 
involved the supervisors and teachers present in the practice of 
essential skills and techniques. Significantly, the teacher edu- 
cation colleges, the State Department of Education, and the 
county school systems co-operated in the planning and operation 
of the conferences and in the organization of displays and ex- 
hibits of essential resources. The programs were, therefore, dem- 
onstrations of how teachers colleges may be curriculum centers, 
not merely depositories of curriculum materials, but tactical cen- 
ters for mobilizing personnel and material resources in attacks 
upon important curriculum problems. 

During the course of this year, the Division of Instruction 
formulated tentative plans for the development in this same sys- 
tematic and comprehensive manner, as integral parts of the gen- 
eral education of all boys and girls, programs in the visual and 
graphic arts, the practical arts, and also in the foreign language 
arts. On March 15, 1951, Dr. Henry Lee Smith, Director of the 
School of Language Training, Foreign Service Institute, Depart- 
ment of State, explored with members of the Division the new 
approaches to the teaching of foreign languages. Dr. Smith 
stressed two points: (1) The aim of our educational system is 
to develop individuals capable of functioning as adults in our own 
culture. This culture is becoming world wide. (2) There is no 
such thing as translation. A word symbol concentrates for each 
an area of experience had in a particular culture with its own 
value system. The corresponding term in another language con- 
centrates a different area of experience had in a different culture 
with its own distinctive value system. 

Resources Education 

At the first meeting of the Division for this school year, Sep- 
tember 13, 1950, Dr. John Ivey, Director'of the Board of Control 
for Southern Regional Education, reviewed what had been done 
in the South at local, county, and state levels to relate educa- 
tional programs to the conservation and use of resources for im- 
proved living. Later he discussed this same matter with the 
county superintendents in their professional conference. 

Dr. Ivey's reports helped give impetus and form to the work 
in resources education being carried forward by the Supervisor 
of Curriculum of the State Department of Education. Through- 
out this year, the counties, under the stimulus of the Supervisor 
of Curriculum, made substantial progress in their four-part re- 
sources program: 

1. Teachers, pupils, parents, and laymen continued the study 
of resources in each of the counties. In two counties, Balti- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



29 



more and Somerset, resources bulletins were prepared as a 
result of these studies. It is expected that the other coun- 
ties will also issue bulletins as their studies develop. 

2. Each county is developing a portfolio of twenty-four pic- 
tures dealing with life in the county. Each picture has its 
own script. Each county is developing also one set of slides 
on a significant aspect of life in the county. 

3. Competent teachers with writing skill have been selected 
to collaborate with specialists in the State Department of 
Health, the State Board of Natural Resources, and other 
agencies to prepare instructional materials which will be 
intelligible and informative for the pupils for whom they 
are intended. A booklet on oyster conservation titled Mary- 
land's Sunken Treasure and a bulletin This Is Our Wealth 
intended to give an over-all view of resources and some- 
thing of the nature of each type are well under way. Other 
booklets in the series will be devoted to the Bay, minerals, 
water resources in the State forests, soil, wildlife, and 
human resources. 

4. State and counties are co-operating in the preparation of a 
series of slides on functional teaching practices. Several 
sets of slides dealing with gardening and nutrition have 
been prepared, and others are in process of preparation. 

These materials in their preparation are a contribution to 
in-service teacher education. When completed, they will be most 
useful in interpreting each county of the State to all the other 
counties. 

Children with Special Needs 

Educational programs for children with special needs in- 
cluded provisions for conservation of hearing and conservation 
of vision, for speech correction, for adaptations in the program 
for those suffering with emotional disturbances and for those 
retarded because of some mental handicap, and instruction at 
home for those prevented from attending school by reason of 
some physical handicap. Miss Geneva Faith Ely, in her first year 
as Supervisor of Special Education, surveyed these programs 
county by county and planned with members of the Division of 
Instruction to extend provisions for meeting special needs as 
rapidly as qualified personnel and necessary facilities can be 
made available. It was agreed that educational measures must 
be based on careful diagnosis, adequate clinical services, pre- 
scription by qualified persons, and retention of normal group 
relationships to the maximum degree allowable by the particular 
handicap. 

The Maryland State Department of Health, working closely 
with county and State educational personnel in all matters relat- 
ing to education, is steadily expanding its program of clinical 



30 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



services. In 1950-51, these included orthopedic clinics, plastic 
surgery clinics, conservation of hearing clinics, conservation of 
vision clinics, speech diagnostic clinics, cardiac clinics (children 
and adult), epilepsy consultation clinics, and cerebral palsy 
clinics. The orthopedic and conservation of hearing clinics were 
the most comprehensive in their coverage. For hearing, the 
screening was done by teachers, supervisors of pupil personnel, 
or specially trained volunteers. In one county lip reading classes 
were established. For vision, the Health Department screened 
and tested in five of the counties; the teachers screened and re- 
ferred in five of the counties ; the schools and the Health Depart- 
ment co-operated in three of the counties ; and the schools. Health 
Department, and parent-teacher associations co-operated in one 
of the counties. Two of the counties used sight-saving materials 
in several of their regular classes, and other counties were in 
process of surveying their needs. One county established an area 
center which served twelve pupils. 

For speech correction, one county had seven full- or part- 
time correctionists who served four hundred pupils; one county 
had the services of a visiting therapist two and one-half days a 
month; one county used clinical services at the University of 
Maryland for its first graders; one county established an area 
center with the services of three specially trained teachers; one 
county had twenty teachers trained to take care of minor de- 
fects ; three counties had a total of twenty-nine teachers prepar- 
ing themselves for service in this special field; four counties co- 
operated with the Health Department in screening and using 
clinical services ; other counties were surveying needs. 

The survey made by the State Supervisor of Special Educa- 
tion on her county-by-county visits revealed one hundred and 
forty-seven pupils instructed at home in sixteen counties. This 
work was done by substitute or by regular and substitute 
teachers. At the time of her visits, the Supervisor found eleven 
cases pending. The total number of pupils taught at home, there- 
fore, exceeded one hundred and forty-seven before the end of 
the year. 

For the mentally retarded, six counties established a total 
of twenty-seven special classes. One of these counties stressed 
provisions for maintaining relationships between pupils in these 
classes and their peer groups throughout the school. Two coun- 
ties used clinical services and provided special classes on the 
elementary level for the emotionally disturbed. Three counties 
established special remedial reading classes. 

The Division of Instruction, for its own guidance in helping 
with county programs for meeting special needs of children, for- 
mulated the following principles : 

1. The problem faced in meeting the needs of these children 
is the basic problem faced in meeting needs of all children. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



31 



It is the challenging problem of individual differences, 
which, in these instances, are so extreme and depart so far 
from the norm as to necessitate consideration of special 
groupings, extended teacher qualifications, and, possibly, 
special facilities. 

2. The purposes of educational programs established for these 
pupils are the purposes of general educational programs 
for all pupils, that is, to develop good home members, citi- 
zens devoted to American ideals, efficient producers and 
consumers, and individuals who use their leisure time for 
recreation, not for dissipation. This principle marks as in- 
appropriate for these pupils classes and groups devoted al- 
most exclusively to repetitive skills and simple mechanical 
activities. 

For those whose handicaps are so severe that independent, 
self-sustaining adulthood can never be expected, this prin- 
ciple does not apply. For these pupils education for appro- 
priate dependency is in order. 

3. Wherever special grouping of short or extended duration is 
provided for these pupils, every arrangement should be 
made for conserving the educational values found in wide 
relationships in the class and general school activities. 

Study of Human Development 

The child study program, which is the major part of the in- 
service teacher education program in the counties of Maryland, 
continued through its sixth year. A total of 581 white and col- 
ored teachers participated in the first-year program, 429 in the 
second-year program, and 456 in the third-year program. The 
total number of those participating in the programs of the first, 
second, and third years was 1,466. Groups for white teachers 
operated in all counties but one. Groups for colored teachers op- 
erated in eight of the twenty-three counties. A large percentage 
of the colored teachers had completed the three-year cycle of 
study. Teachers new to the system and others who have not yet 
participated are so scattered in the counties and in the State as 
to make effective group study difficult. The program has prob- 
ably reached a plateau and will continue on a sustaining basis, 
involving all teachers new to the system in groups meeting regu- 
larly for the three-year study or, where this is impracticable, in 
workshop and summer programs devoted to teaching the basic 
concepts and procedures of the program. 

This year for the first time, the Division of Instruction took 
steps to extend the concepts and procedures of studying human 
development and the ne^ds inherent in that development to the 
parent education program. Miss Dorothy W. Shires, newly-ap- 
pointed State Supervisor of Pupil Personnel, conducted a week's 



32 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Eeport 



workshop for all county supervisors of pupil personnel and visit- 
ing teachers at Carvel Hall, Annapolis, November 27-December 
1, 1950. Dr. Daniel A. Prescott and Dr. Glenn Dildine of the staff 
of the Institute for Child Study of the University of Maryland, 
and Mr. T. H. Owen Knight, Supervisor of Pupil Personnel in 
Montgomery County, served as consultants. Several of the coun- 
ties have rather flourishing parent education programs in opera- 
tion. The general sessions of the workshop and the small group 
discussions were used to share experiences and techniques 
learned in the county programs and to consider the adaptation 
to the adult level of the method and content of the child study 
program. 

The development of parent education programs is only one 
of the many responsibilities of county supervisors of pupil per- 
sonnel and visiting teachers. Miss Shires worked with them 
throughout the year on problems of withdrawals and irregular 
attendance. Since, however, w^ork with parents will pay long- 
time dividends in effecting successful adjustments of children at 
school, Miss Shires kept in touch with the parent education pro- 
gram and planned to build co-operatively with the supervisors 
of pupil personnel a sound base for its expansion in succeeding 
years. 

The Schools in the Present Crisis 

Any report of instructional programs and activities in our 
schools for this year w^ould be incomplete if it did not recognize 
the fact that our children are living in a world of tension and 
crisis. This truth inevitably affects the content of courses, guid- 
ance and counseling services, the extent and character of emo- 
tional disturbances experienced by children, and the attitudes of 
adults toward the schools. 

The objectives of the public school remain unchanged in 
time of crisis. But the schools must realize these objectives un- 
der conditions which have been greatly affected by science and 
technology and by corresponding changes in the whole realm of 
human relations. These must be reflected in drastic revisions in 
the content of the curriculum. The members of the staff of the 
State Department of Education gave specific expression to these 
facts in a booklet entitled The Schools in the Present Emergency. 
This booklet which suggested necessary adaptations in the school 
program was distributed widely over the State among teachers, 
administrators, supervisors, and others. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



33 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 
Day School — Vocational Education Program 
The day school program for vocational education in the high 
schools of the State continued to expand in the full-time area 
program, but more rapid progress was made in the development 
of the part-time and work-experience programs of the State. 

The work-experience program incorporates employment by 
establishments and business concerns in the field of trade and in- 
dustrial education, farm projects in the field of vocational agri- 
cultural education, and home project achievement in the field of 
home economics. 

County boards of education made commendable progress in 
developing the new facilities for all the fields in vocational edu- 
cation. Some outstanding facilities now available in Maryland 
would compare very favorably with any facilities in the Nation. 

The greatest deterrent in the development of the program 
during the year was the lack of teacher supply which, in turn, 
was brought about by the low teacher salary scale when com- 
pared with competitive opportunities in industry and private 
enterprise. 

Adult Education 

The adult education program in vocational education ex- 
panded very rapidly, more than doubling the enrollment for the 
previous year. The amount of $68,707.00 of Federal vocational 
funds was spent for the vocational education program of adult 
education and $75,000.00 of State funds were exhausted in this 
area of education. In addition, several counties supplemented 
the State appropriation from local school funds. 

There were increasing requests made by the industries in 
the State which had defense contracts. These requests were in 
the nature of developing evening school programs for employed 
individuals in order to increase their technical knowledge and 
skills so that they would be more productive on the job. These 
requests were concentrated in the areas of Washington, Prince 
George's, Montgomery and Baltimore Counties and Baltimore 
City. 

School Lunch Program 

The School Lunch Program expanded approximately 20 per 
cent in the number of participants during the year 1950-51. The 
number of schools operating school lunch programs were 649. 
The total number of receipts for lunches from the children in the 
schools of Baltimore City and the counties of the State amounted 
to $4,323,231.11. 

The program is co-operative in nature in that the local 
schools operating the program charge from 20 to 30 cents per 



34 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



meal, which consists of a balanced meal. The Federal government 
allocated $640,283.00 for distribution to the schools that met the 
standards of operation as set up by the Maryland State Board 
of Education. 

The United States Department of Agriculture also distrib- 
uted approximately $484,000.00 in commodities to the schools 
through the State Department of Education. These commodities 
were given without charge, with the exception, in a few in- 
stances, where the freight had to be paid by the local school. 

Surplus Property 

During the year 1950-51 surplus war materials and property, 
whose acquisition value amounted to $1,856,907.00, were dis- 
tributed to the educational instrumentalities of the State (ele- 
mentary schools, high schools, colleges, universities) . These items 
of surplus were screened in the Government establishment, either 
civil or military, inventoried, and such inventories as were avail- 
able were mailed to the local educational authorities so that they 
would be advised of the kinds of material and what quantities 
would be made available to them. 

In general, all of these surplus materials were delivered to a 
central warehouse in Baltimore, space being made available by 
the Baltimore City school authorities, and the local school au- 
thorities arranged for transportation from that point to the place 
where such materials were assigned. 

It would be impossible to enumerate the different items or 
types of materials that were made available, but to mention a 
few, there were distributed athletic equipment, teachers' desks, 
filing cabinets, motor vehicles, tractors, and several hundred 
typewriters. All of these properties were sent to the schools 
without any charge except that necessary to defray the cost of 
hauling. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



35 



DIVISION OF CERTIFICATION AND ACCREDITATION 
Certification 

The work of this Division consisted in obtaining transcripts 
of records and evaluating them, in issuing certificates to adminis- 
trators, supervisors, and teachers in the pubhc and nonpublic 
schools, and in participating in interviews and conferences rela- 
tive to certification. 

As will be seen on TABLE 72, page 115, the number of cer- 
tificates issued has steadily increased over the three-year period, 
1948-49 to 1950-51. The total increase was 617, or more than 
37 per cent. The increase was due primarily to high teacher turn- 
over and the need for additional teachers to take care of in- 
creased enrollments. 

It is significant that 818 of the certificates issued were sub- 
standard ; that is. War Emergency Certificates or Provisional or 
Substitute Teachers Certificates. Ten years previously, only 23 
teachers held substandard certificates valid only during the year 
in which they were issued. On the other hand, in 1950-51 more 
than 600 teachers who had been issued war emergency certifi- 
cates during the previous decade, in addition to the 818 to whom 
nonstandard certificates were issued in 1950-51, were still teach- 
ing in the public schools. The phenomenal loss of qualified 
teachers because of war and postwar conditions, inadequate sal- 
aries, the unprecedented increase in the school population, and 
the failure of colleges to prepare enough qualified replacements 
and additions have meant that many classrooms must be staffed 
with teachers who do not meet the State's minimum standards 
for regular certificates. 

Since the shortage of teachers is greatest in the elementary 
schools, the State Board of Education, on June 8, 1950, passed 
By-law 73, which provides for the temporary use of junior high 
school teachers in the elementary schools. The By-law reads as 
follows : 

By-law 73 

In view of the shortage of qualified elementary school teachers, 
during the school years 1950-53 Junior High School Teachers' Certifi- 
cates shall be valid for teaching in the elementary schools. Teachers 
holding such certificates who continue to teach in the elementary 
grades shall qualify for Bachelor of Science Certificates in Elemen- 
tary Education within six years of the dates of appointment. 

On the same date the Board also modified the requirement 
for certification for professional work in the county libraries. 
Revised By-law 67 reads as follows: 

Certificates for librarians in the county libraries shall be issued 
under the following titles: 

County Library Administrator 
County Librarian of Special Services 



36 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



County Branch Librarian 
Library Assistant 

Any of these certificates, valid for three years in a Maryland 
county library, may be issued to a graduate of a college which 
has been atpproved for the training of librarians by the American 
Library Association or by the Maryland State Board of Educa- 
tion, provided such applicant has completed a full year or thirty 
semester hours of work in Library Science, provided the appli- 
cant passes the special medical examination, and provided the 
applicant has been tentatively appointed to a position for which 
the particular certificate is required. 

These certificates may be renewed for four years, then for 
six-year periods, upon evidence of successful experience and pro- 
fessional spirit. 

Accreditation 
Academic Schools 

The number of certificates of approval issued to nonpublic 
academic schools and the number of certificates revoked during 
the school year 1950-51 were as follows. 

Number of Certificates 
Type of School Issued Revoked 

Chiropractic 1 

Dramatics in Education 1 

Junior College 1 1 

Kindergarten 1 

Kindergarten — first grade 1 1 

Nursery school 5 2 

Nursery school — kindergarten 1 

Secondary 2 

The two nursery schools closed voluntarily because of illness 
of the director or for other reasons and the directors of eight 
other preschool groups which were unable to qualify for approval 
decided to operate without using the word "school." Thus they 
were not obliged to meet the State requirements. Lack of prep- 
aration on the part of the teachers was usually the most serious 
deficiency. 

Two other schools (a nursery-and-primary school and a nur- 
sery school-kindergarten) requested and received visits from the 
supervisor, although the organizations could not be approved 
because they were on Federal property. Other individuals con- 
ferred about opening schools, but, finding they could not meet 
the requirements with regard to teacher qualifications, equip- 
ment, and /or space, abandoned the projects. 

Two preparatory schools which had been operating in Mary- 
land for a number of years decided to close their doors and their 
certificates of approval were therefore revoked. 

A junior college was foi'ced to close because of small enroll- 
ment and inadequate finances. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



37 



Nonacademic Schools 

The special task of the Division of Accreditation in 1950-51 
was to recertify to the Veterans Administration the approval of 
all profit schools which had previously been approved for the 
training of veterans and which were still operating. Public Law 
610, passed by the 81st Congress and approved on January 13, 
1950, provided that all such schools should be re-examined ; that 
certain criteria, including a few new standards, should be ap- 
plied; and that only those schools which met the standards 
should be recertified to the Veterans Administration. It was 
therefore necessary to print a new application blank, have every 
school affected fill out and submit the application and other mate- 
rial in duplicate, process the applications, and send recertifica- 
tions to the Veterans Administration with supporting data. A 
total of 142 schools were processed and all except one were re- 
certified. 

An additional supervisor was appointed to help with the 
approval and supervision of nonpublic, nonacademic schools and 
with the recertification of the nonprofit schools, as well as with 
the regular routine work of the Division. 

The number of nonpublic, nonacademic schools approved and 
the number of certificates revoked during the school year, 1950- 
51, were as follows : 

Type of Number of Certificates 

School or Curriculum Issued Revoked 

Art 3 ' 

Barber 1 

Beauty 5 

Dance 8 1 

Electricity 1 

Flight 6 

Meat Cutting 1 

Music 2 1 

Photography , 1 

Public Speaking 1 

Refrigeration and Electricity 1 

Sewing 1 

Watchmaking 1 

All the certificates revoked had been held by schools which 
ceased operations. One of these, a beauty school, was obliged to 
close because it had deteriorated and no longer met the require- 
ments for approval. 

A school for the preparation of practical nurses, which had 
been in existence for some years and with which the Department 
had been working intermittently and unsuccessfully since 1948, 
decided early in the fiscal year, 1950-51, not to contest in the 
courts the decision of the Superintendent, affirmed by the State 
Board of Education, that the school must close. It agreed to 
cease operations in September, 1950, and acted -upon this agree- 
ment. 



38 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



Special Surveys 

The Division continued to use the services of outside experts, 
as well as members of the other divisions in the State Depart- 
ment, to evaluate the plans for new schools which wished to 
start operations and to study the work of schools which were 
already functioning. 

The Secretary of the American Association of Junior Col- 
leges and a specialist for junior colleges in the U. S. Office of 
Education visited a junior college designed especially for the 
education of members of a religious order and recommended that 
the State Superintendent approve the institution. Favorable ac- 
tion followed. 

At the invitation of the Division, at the request of a school 
of business administration for permission to issue a bachelor's 
degree, a committee consisting of the Dean of the School of 
Business and Public Administration at Temple University, the 
Dean of the College of Commerce at New York University, and 
the Dean of the Graduate School of George Washington Univer- 
sity, surveyed the school. The committee was of the opinion that 
the school would need to make a number of changes before the 
State Superintendent should authorize it to award a standard 
degree. 

A member of the Engineering Department of Johns Hopkins 
University, who reviewed the work of two schools which were 
offering courses in air conditioning and refrigeration, expressed 
general satisfaction and made suggestions for improvements. 

Another member of the Engineering School at Hopkins vis- 
ited four radio schools, with similar results. 

A leading musician in the City and the Dean of the Mary- 
land Institute visited a music school and an art school, respec- 
tively, and recommended their approval. 

Members of the State Board of Barber Examiners visited 
three barber schools with members of the Division and advised 
concerning possible improvements in the various schools. 

A leading photographer from Washington, who was recom- 
mended by the Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York, 
visited a school of photography and recommended that it be ap- 
proved. 

One of the administrators from the George Westinghouse 
Vocational High School in Brooklyn, New York, came to visit two 
schools of watchmaking and suggested means for strengthening 
the institutions. The head of the Upholstery Department of Man- 
hattan Trades Center, New York City, visited the upholstery 
schools and, though his report was generally favorable, he too, 
made helpful suggestions. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



39 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

The development of a State-wide library program of public, 
school, and institutional libraries is the duty of this Division. The 
staff works with the public librarians and trustees, the school 
librarians and school administrators, and the State institution 
librarians and officers to help them develop and improve library 
services. It works with local and State groups and organizations : 
to interpret library services; to promote local leadership for 
establishing libraries where they do not exist or give little serv- 
ice ; and to further understanding of the possibilities of improved 
library service with increased support. 

The staff of the Division was invited to work with the 
County Councils of Parent Teacher Associations in Calvert, Dor- 
chester, and Kent Counties to promote the establishment of 
county library service. The people of the nine counties without 
county-wide public library service are carrying on educational 
programs toward establishing libraries. A radio broadcast on 
Maryland Library Development was given by the Director of the 
Division of Library Extension, a county librarian, a county 
library trustee, and a county superintendent of schools on Janu- 
ary 5 during time allotted to the Maryland Congress of Parents 
and Teachers and the Maryland State Teachers Association. 

The Division loans books, pamphlets, periodicals, clippings, 
and audio-visual aids to supplement the service of the local li- 
braries and to people in areas with no public library service. All 
counties borrowed 57,017 pieces of material in 1950-51. This was 
a 15 per cent increase over the previous year and a 159 per cent 
increase over the year ending in June, 1948, which was the first 
year that this Division was able to supplement substantially the 
service of the county libraries. 

Seventy per cent of all loans were made because of requests 
from the 13 counties with established public libraries. The type 
of reference request is becoming more technical and requires 
more time for searching. The work of the county librarians in- 
creases the work of the Division rather than decreases it, be- 
cause the residents of the counties are becoming more aware of 
what library service can offer. They are asking for books and 
information which the county libraries cannot yet supply. Twen- 
ty-six per cent of all loans were adult nonfiction books, of which 
one third were arranged for by interlibrary loans from the Enoch 
Pratt Free Library and other libraries in Maryland and outside 
the State. Sixteen per cent of all loans were in exhibits to the 
counties and State organizations. These exhibit collections guide 
the purchases for school and public libraries or show the mem- 
bers of organizations examples of what libraries can furnish. 

Film circulation has increased 135 per cent this year. Cur- 
riculum materials from the Curriculum Laboratory at Towson 



40 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



State Teachers College were added to the collection in October, 
1950. Courses of study circulated during this year were 466. A 
count of reference questions answered was kept from November, 
1950, through June, 1951. Adult questions numbered 2,776 and 
413 juvenile questions were answered. 

Reorganization of routines in the circulation and reference 
section was begun. Routines for booking and circulating films 
were carefully examined, revised, and simplified. 

Special attention has been given to the careful selection of 
nonfiction for purchase. The Readers' Counselor and the Refer- 
ence Librarian have used the Enoch Pratt Free Library's new 
book selection room. All new books are displayed there for one 
week. Many are reviewed by the Pratt staff. The State's non- 
fiction collection has improved noticeably as a result of the use 
of this service. 

Public Libraries 

Progress in public library development was highlighted by 
several events of State-wide significance. In October, at the in- 
vitation of the Department, Mrs. Gretchen K. Schenk, Special 
Consultant in State Library Planning and Development, spent 
two weeks in the State visiting libraries and meeting with libra- 
rians and library trustees. This is the first time since the pass- 
age of the Public Libraries Law of 1945, that a specialist from 
outside the State has been asked to give recommendations for 
improved library service. Although Mrs. Schenk recognized the 
rapid progress made in library development within the past five 
years, she emphasized the fact that public libraries in the State 
were not giving a high quality of library service and that State- 
wide development should stress the necessity for the same qual- 
ity of service throughout the State. She cited the need for: in- 
creased State and local funds, increased book stock and profes- 
sionally-trained personnel, increased efficiency of library opera- 
tion through co-operative projects between adjacent county li- 
braries. Her findings are being used as a guide for further plan- 
ning. 

The Maryland Association of Library Trustees was formed 
in November, 1950. This is an independent organization for all 
members of public library boards of trustees. Its purpose is the 
strengthening of public libraries throughout the State by study 
of library problems and conditions, planning for and promoting 
future library development. 

A new annual statistical report form for public libraries 
was prepared by the Division of Library Extension staff with the 
assistance of a committee of public librarians. This new report 
form gives a more comprehensive picture of library activity and 
a better method of evaluating library progress. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



41 



A statement of "Suggested Policies of Book Selection in Pub- 
lic Libraries" was prepared by members of the staff of the Divi- 
sion of Library Extension and a committee of county and muni- 
cipal librarians. It was adopted by public librarians as a State- 
wide guide for the preparation of more detailed policies in each 
local library. 

Four conferences were held by the Division of Library Ex- 
tension for county and municipal public library administrators 
during the year. At two of the meetings, Mrs. Schenk discussed 
the library situation in Maryland and the possibilities of im- 
proved services. Trustees representing various libraries through- 
out the State attended one of these meetings. The librarians met 
again in January to discuss proposed library legislation to be 
presented to the State General Assembly, and in April for com- 
mittee reports and further planning. Plans were made for a 
series of conferences each year devoted to problems of library 
administration. 

Four new public library buildings were dedicated this year, 
marking the first public library construction in more than ten 
years. The need for adequate buildings to house new and expand- 
ing libraries is an imperative one ; however, it seems significant 
to note that each of the new buildings w^as made possible by sub- 
stantial gifts and local contributions rather than by appropri- 
ated funds . 

The modern, new building of the Ruth Enlow Library of 
Garrett County was dedicated in December, 1950. It houses the 
county library, established in 1946, and serves as headquarters 
for county-wide bookmobile service. 

The St. Mary's County Memorial Library, established in the 
spring of 1950, was opened for use in October, 1950. The build- 
ing is an old historic house remodeled into a public library. Book- 
mobile service was begun in January, 1951. 

The Charles County Library, established in the spring of 
1950, completed organization and officially opened in the fall. 
Bookmobile service throughout the county was begun in the 
spring of 1951. 

The Davis Library in Westminster was opened in the spring 
of 1951. The Westminster Public Library dates as a subscription 
library from 1863, but this marks the first time a separate library 
building and free service has been provided. The library is sup- 
ported by income from endowment and not by public funds. 

The Oxford Library of the Talbot Countv Free Librarv 
opened in the fall of 1950. The Pikesville Library of the Balti- 
more County Library will open in its new building early in the 
fall of 1951. The three new branch buildings of the Enoch Pratt 
Free Library, Baltimore, are under construction. 



42 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



The Montgomery County Department of Public Libraries, es- 
tablished by law of Montgomery County Council in May, 1950, 
was organized during this year. This department has the re- 
sponsibility of integrating the services and facilities of the in- 
dependent public libraries into a county system and to provide 
services to areas now without library facilities. The library does 
not participate in the State aid fund. 

The establishment of library systems in Charles, Mont- 
gomery, and St. Mary's Counties increases to fourteen the num- 
ber of counties giving county-wide library service. 

A great deal of the time of the Supervisor of County and 
Institution Libraries was spent in visiting newly-organized li- 
braries, in advising library trustees and librarians in the setting 
up of policies for library administration and operation. Frequent 
conferences were held also with the new library administrators 
in the older county libraries. 

The staff of the Division participated in the planning and 
program of several book fairs and exhibits in the counties. They 
also prepared and staffed exhibits at such State-wide meetings 
as: the Rural Women's Short Course and the 4-H Conference, 
both at the University of Maryland ; The Maryland Congress of 
Parents and Teachers, and the annual CIO Regional Education 
Conference at New Windsor. 

School Libraries 

The Division of Instruction and the Division of Library Ex- 
tension sponsored the second in-service training meeting for 
school librarians. Over 100 librarians attended a two-day meet- 
ing in Baltimore. Mrs. Mary Peacock Douglas, Supervisor of 
School Libraries, Raleigh, North Carolina, Board of Education, 
who conducted the meeting last year did so again this year. 

_ Four counties had regularly scheduled meetings of the li- 
brarians, usually with the high school supervisor in attendance. 
One county group issued a newsletter five times during the year. 

The Division of Library Extension continued its promotion 
of exhibits of books to the counties, encouraging school adminis- 
trators to give teachers and hbrarians an opportunity to examine 
materials before they were selected for purchase. 

School libraries are continuing to develop on a sound and 
. sensible basis. Supervisors, principals, and librarians are grow- 
ing in their awareness of the place of the library in the school 
program. 

If the program is to continue to develop, there are three 



Maryland State Department of Education 



43 



major problems which need attention and action at the State 
level : 

1. A consistent, integrated program for educating libra- 
rians — especially part-time ones — within the State 

2. Recognition of the fact that some counties are ready for 
elementary school librarians, which means the State has 
a responsibility for recognizing the need and making 
provision for them 

3. Certification regulations for library supervisors at the 
county level. The larger counties are ready for them and 
the certification for supervisor of special subjects is not 
applicable. 

State Teachers College Libraries 

Standards for the libraries of the State Teachers Colleges 
are being developed. Following survey reports submitted by the 
colleges, the Director of the Division of Library Extension and 
the Supervisor of Higher Education, Division of Instruction, 
visited each of the colleges and consulted with the presidents 
and librarians, working to develop standards which will improve 
library service in each of the colleges. 

State Institutions 

The Division of Library Extension has the responsibility for 
the promotion of improved library service in the State institu- 
tions by acting in an advisory capacity to heads of the State de- 
partments having supervision over institutions, to superinten- 
dents of institutions themselves, and to staif members responsi- 
ble for operating the library. The Division also makes available 
for loan to the institutions the books in the division and fre- 
quently works with members of institution staffs in selection of 
materials. 

Libraries in the State Tuberculosis Hospitals show growth 
both in books and in use. Expansion of physical facilities is 
planned for the coming year at the Henryton Hospital. 

The Supervisor of County and Institution Libraries sub- 
mitted to the Superintendent of the State Department of Correc- 
tion and to the Director of Juvenile Training Schools, State De- 
partment of Public Welfare, complete reports on the condition 
of libraries in each institution and made recommendations for 
improvement of services. Libraries are totally ineffectual and 
inadequate in these institutions. Lack of proper books and other 
materials, lack of funds allocated for library purchases and lack 
of personnel qualified by either training or interest in the library 
add up to very little real progress in library development. Ex- 
ception to this is the progress of the Maryland House of Correc- 



44 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



tion which completely reorganized the library and added several 
hundred new books during the year. 

The Commissioner of the State Department of Mental Hy- 
giene and the Director of Rehabilitation have requested the Su- 
pervisor of County and Institution Libraries to submit for their 
consideration a plan of adequate library service in the mental 
hospitals. It is believed that such a plan will be the beginning 
of a program of library service in these hospitals. 

Additional State Aid for Public Libraries 

There is great need for additional support to make it pos- 
sible for the county libraries to give good service throughout the 
counties. Both local and State funds should be increased. The 
Legislative and Planning Committee of the Maryland Library 
Association has proposed legislation to provide an added 40 cents 
per capita in State Aid for operating public libraries for the 
counties and Baltimore City. This amount should allow the li- 
braries to demonstrate a better service which would stimulate 
additional local support. It would make it possible for the nine 
counties without libraries to establish county-wide systems of 
libraries. 

Increased interest in library service is State-wide. Some of 
the organizations which are promoting improved libraries as a 
part of their State programs are: American Association of Uni- 
versity Women, American Legion, American Legion Auxiliary, 
AMVETS, Business and Professional Women's Club, Junior 
Chamber of Commerce, Kiwanis Club, League of Women Voters, 
Lions Club, Maryland Association of Library Trustees, Maryland 
Congress of Colored Parents and Teachers, Maryland Congress of 
Parents and Teachers, Maryland Council of Homemakers Clubs, 
Maryland Council on Education, Maryland Educational Associa- 
tion, Maryland Farm Bureau, Maryland Farm Bureau Associated 
Women, Maryland Federation of Women's Clubs, Maryland Li- 
brary Association, Maryland State Grange, Maryland State 
Teachers Association, Maryland Tuberculosis Association, Op- 
timist Club, Rotary Club, Senior 4-H Club Council, Soroptimist 
Club, local civic and improvement associations, and many other 
groups. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



45 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

Each year since 1929, the Division of Vocational Rehabili- 
tation has endeavored to broaden its usefulness in the conserva- 
tion of human resources within the area of the needs of disabled 
people. At the same time, it has sought to develop its own staff 
in professional knowledge and techniques, to utilize to the fullest 
all community resources, and to extend its service to more han- 
dicapped individuals. 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1951, a total of 1,023 
disabled citizens of Maryland were rehabilitated into substan- 
tial employment by the counselors of the Division of Vocational 
Rehabilitation. The rate of annual earnings of this group was 
$1,860,950.00, an amount equal to the total expenditures of both 
State and Federal funds for the entire rehabilitation program 
over the past four years. 

Other accomplishments of special note were the expansion 
of services to the severely disabled, development of training 
agreements for special work courses at the Baltimore Goodwill 
Industries and Baltimore League for Crippled Children and 
Adults, co-operation with the Governor's Committee in promot- 
ing employment of the handicapped and evaluation of the Mary- 
land Program by rehabilitation specialists from five other states. 

Rehabilitation Workshop at Frostburg 

The entire professional staff spent one week at Frostburg 
in July of 1950, participating in a workshop of training in case- 
work procedures, interviewing techniques, case load manage- 
ment, standards of counselor performance, and physical restora- 
tion. The discussion leaders were members of the Office of Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation ; they were assisted by the medical consult- 
ant and supervisory staff of the State office. 

Expanded Service to the Severely Disabled 

Growth in experience and development of technical knowl- 
edge on the part of rehabilitation counselors together with cor- 
responding advances in medical science and physical medicine, 
have made possible the rendering of assistance to a limited num- 
ber of the severely disabled group (cerebral palsied, paraplegics, 
mentally handicapped, homebound). For this group the rehabili- 
tation centers offer the best opportunity for physical and training 
rehabilitation. Last year the Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation 
Center in Virginia was used for this purpose. This year we have 
sent some of these cases to the Institute of Physical Medicine 
and Rehabilitation and to the Institute for the Crippled and Dis- 
abled, both of which are located in New York. These last two 
centers are more amply equipped with specialized services for 
certain handicapped persons that cannot be cared for in the Vir- 
ginia center. 



46 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



The specialized services consist of skills of physical medi- 
cine, surgery, psychiatry, physical therapy, occupational therapy, 
utilized in a team approach to get the disabled person to walk 
with the use of artificial appliances, to care for his daily needs, 
to develop muscle tone and work tolerance. By fully utilizing 
these services the hospital personnel are able to get paraplegics 
with no leg control at all to ambulate by the aid of braces and 
crutches. (This involves developing strong arm and shoulder 
muscles to walk with crutches.) With spastics, the problem is to 
develop muscle co-ordination and speech control. For every one 
of these individuals there is need for therapy in the effective use 
of enforced leisure, developing the confidence and the will to 
work through reading, occupational therapy, the social hour, and 
vocational training. 

When the disabled person has an impaired physical function 
which limits walking, eating, attending to daily needs, using a 
manual or a vocational skill, new functioning has to be developed 
before employment is possible. To the rehabilitation centers 
where the facilities are most practicable, the Division sends 
clients to prepare them physically for work preparatory to train- 
ing or employment. 

Many of the severely handicapped are sent to other centers 
by the Division ,and some centers refer persons to us. The tuber- 
culosis sanatoria and the mental institutions refer cases that 
have already received adequate medical and psychiatric treat- 
ment. When the patients are ready for discharge, the Division 
is able to provide the service needed to bridge the gap from insti- 
tution to employment. 

While the tuberculous patient often has no loss or impair- 
ment of legs and arms or sense organs, he has work tolerance 
limitations which often negate any work skill possessed, for 
which substitute skills might need to be developed. To supple- 
ment the therapies already being given by the hospital, the Divi- 
sion provides vocational training courses at the same time. In 
other cases vocational training is begun when the patient is re- 
leased. 

The patients in the mental institutions are sometimes re- 
leased with vocational skills and demonstrated ability to work, 
but in most cases they must make job, social, and community ad- 
justments when institutional treatment has ceased. 

The severely disabled are found among every disability 
group. They are marked by extreme physical or mental limita- 
tions, often have long been unemployed, do not always wish to 
work, and need specialized and long-term physical restoration 
treatment before employment; they prove difficult to engage in 
full-time employment, and their rehabilitation is more difficult to 
achieve than the usual case served. Often the only source of em- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



47 



ployment for many of them is self -employment, either in their 
own homes or in sheltered workshops. 

It is unknown how many of these are in need of rehabilita- 
tion services, but the total number of persons hospitalized in 
State mental and tuberculosis sanatoria and in the chronic dis- 
ease hospitals, indicates the small beginning rehabilitation has 
made toward the total problem of the severely handicapped. 
Rehabilitation workers have just begun to skim the surface in 
this area. 

Co-operative Training Agreements with Goodwill Industries and Baltimore 
League for Crippled Children and Adults 

These two agencies set up training courses for persons who 
because they are so extremely limited physically or mentally can- 
not be accommodated in regular training classes or competitive 
employment. The teacher must give these persons special in- 
struction in elementary work habits and skills as well as develop 
within them emotional attitudes necessary to work. The train- 
ing is given through work experience on the job. The goal is to 
prepare them in the shortest possible time for competitive voca- 
tional training and employment. 

The courses available are : 

Pre-vocational Training and Adjustment: Leather Work and Shoe 
Repair, Woodwork and Refinishing, Fabrics and Upholstery, Appli- 
ance Repair, Radio Clock and Watch Repair, Jewelry and Silverware 
Repairing and Refinishing, Clothing Construction, Cleaning and Re- 
pairing, Hand Weaving, Building Maintenance, Elevator Operator, 
Truck Helper and Warehouseman, Office, Merchandising and Sales, 
Restaurant. 

Appliance Repair — General: Electrical Appliances, Wheel Toy Re- 
pair, Washing Machines, Stoves, Sewing Machines, Ice Refrigerators, 
Phonographs, Lawn Mowers; also Antiquing, Brocading, Cable As- 
sembly, Decorating, Drill Press Operator, Paint Spraying, Pasting 
and Pleating, Sanding, Small Parts Assembly, Spinning and Tinning, 
Wiring (table and floor lamps). 

Co-operation with the Governor's Committee to Promote Employment of 
the Physically Handicapped / 

By active co-operation with the Governor's Committee to 
Promote Employment of the Physically Handicapped, the Divi- 
sion has made strides in publicizing the idea that ''It's Good Busi- 
ness to Hire the Physically Handicapped." Getting the handi- 
capped employed is one major obstacle in achieving vocational 
rehabilitation. 

The Division works closely with the Department of Employ- 
ment Security through the Governor's Committee. Securing se- 
lective placement for the handicapped is dependent on the edu- 
cated employer. Many employers in the past have been preju- 
diced against giving jobs to the handicapped. The fact that a 
recent study which revealed that "matched work records of 



48 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



11,000 physically handicapped workers and 18,000 able-bodied 
workers in 109 establishments" shows them to be 

Just as Efficient — Just as Reliable — Just as Stable 

Just as Careful — Just as Versatile 

was widely publicized by the committee and has made a great 
impact on breaking down employer resistance. 

These facts and other related facts have been disseminated 
throughout the State by means of : 

Articles in trade journals and house organs 

Informative letters to county committees 

The Monthly News Letter of the Governor's Committee 

Demonstration of Blind Worker on Drill Press at Safety Conference 

of State Industrial Accident Commission 
Essay and Poster Contests 

Windov^r displays in libraries and show windows of business houses 
The Information Bulletin — "It's Good Business to Hire the Physically 
Handicapped" 

The Essay Contest conducted through the public and private 
schools of Maryland was won by a senior of the Lonaconing High 
School, who also won fifth place in the National Contest. The 
Poster Contest was won by a student at Morgan State College. 
Prizes were awarded to the winners by the Governor at a lunch- 
eon attended by prominent citizens of the State. These contests 
have awakened among present and potential employers a con- 
sciousness of the need to employ suitably-trained handicapped 
workers on jobs they can do as well as so-called normal persons. 

Since the final objective of rehabilitation is employment in 
a suitable job, the Governor's Committee, with its purpose to 
educate employers to hire the handicapped, is a potent force in 
keeping this phase of our educational program to serve the 
State's disabled population. 

Evaluative Criteria Committee 

In the spring of 1951 a committee consisting of out-of-state 
professional rehabilitation workers evaluated the Maryland Pro- 
gram. The members of the committee who were invited by the 
State Board of Education were the State Director of Rehabilita- 
tion in Oklahoma, Chairman ; the Supervisor of Guidance, Train- 
ing and' Placement in Virginia ; the Supervisor of Case Services 
in West Virginia ; the District Supervisor in Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania ; and a Rehabilitation Counselor in Delaware. A consult- 
ant from the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and another 
from the National Rehabilitation Association assisted in the 
study. 

The group used the Evaluative Criteria for Programs of 
Vocational Rehabilitation prepared by a committee of the States 
Vocational Rehabilitation Council several years ago. In advance 
of the visit of the evaluation committee, the entire Maryland 



Maryland State Department of Education 



49 



rehabilitation staff conducted a self -evaluation study of its own 
in accordance with the standard procedure that had been recom- 
mended. 

The committee made a detailed study of each office, its staff, 
plant, equipment, records, cases, procedures, and practices; the 
procedure included talks with the staff, individually and collec- 
tively, and with agencies who co-operate in the rehabilitation 
program. 

As a result of this study, a full report was made to the State 
Board through the State Superintendent of Schools, chief among 
the findings being the following: 

1. The Maryland staff is to be congratulated upon preparation 
in writing of a philosophy with respect to its responsibility for the 
handicapped. 

2. In the opinion of all contmittee members, use of community 
resources is one of the strongest elements in the Maryland vocational 
rehabilitation program. There is substantial evidence that vocational 
rehabilitation counselors know and make excellent use of many re- 
sources for assistance in diagnosing, counseling, physically restor- 
ing, training, and placing their clients. 

3. The test of any administrative organization is whether it 
works. The present set-up is working without noticeable friction. 
In fact, counselors are outspoken in their commendation of the atti- 
tudes and methods of their administrative heads, and this is a com- 
pliment to the State office staff. 

4. The quality of the staff is, of course, the most important ele- 
ment in any program, and committee members were unanimous in 
expressing the opinion that Maryland vocational rehabilitation staff 
members are without exception well educated and professionally 
minded. They also possess the personal qualities necessary for suc- 
cess in rehabilitation. The agency is to be congratulated upon the 
quality of its staff and the personnel policies that have made its 
selection and retention possible. 

Case Load 

The case load of 6,459 persons exceeded all previous esti- 
mates and is more than double the 3,199 of 1946. The 2,603 new 
cases exceeded those of the previous year by 421 cases. More 
than 15,000 disabled persons in Maryland are known to need re- 
habilitation service; this means that the program is reaching 
less than half of those who need assistance. 

The "new" cases were reported by 33 different agencies from 
all 23 counties and Baltimore City. Public welfare agencies led 
the list with 315, while hospital clinics came next with 284, and 
health agencies next with 241. 

A total of 1,023 were rehabilitated — 459 in Baltimore City 
and 564 in the counties. Among the group were 72 blind persons. 
These 1,023 rehabilitated persons are now supporting with their 
earnings not only themselves but, in addition 1,071 dependents. 



50 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 1 — Opening and Closing Dates of Maryland Public Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1951 



County 



Date of 
Opening 
Schools in 
September, 
1950 



Date of 
Closing 
Schools in 
June, 
1951 



County 



Date of 
Opening 
Schools in 
September, 
1950 



Baltimore City 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore. . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline , 

Carroll 

Cecil ; 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . , 

Frederick 

Garrett 



Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . 
Prince George' 
Queen Anne's, 
St, Mary's. . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . 
Wicomico. . . . 
Worcester . . . . 



TABLE 2 — Number of Maryland County Public Schools in Session Fewer Than 
180 Days, Year Ending June 30, 1951 



Schools in Session Less Than 180 Days 



Year 














Total 


Number 


Larger 


Separate 


Combined 


County 


Number 


Having One 


Elementary 


High 


Elementary 






Teacher 


Schools 


Schools 


and High 


white SCHOOLS 


1950 


1 








1 


1951 













COLORED SCHOOLS 



1950 


1 




1 






1951 


3 






3 




Charles 


3 






*3 





* 178 days for one and 176 days each for two. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



51 



TABLE 3 — Enrollment, Teaching Staff, and Number of Schools: Public and Nonpublic, by 
Color: State of Maryland, Baltimore City, and Counties of Maryland: 
Year Ending June 30, 1951 





Granoj Total 


Elementary 


1 

Secondary 


Type of School 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 



ENROLLMENT 



Public and Nonpublic 




















State 


440,346 


359,705 


80,641 


301,381 


243,363 


58,018 


138,965 


116,342 


22,623 


City 


165,136 


120,646 


44,490 


119,056 


85,689 


33,367 


46,080 


34,957 


11,123 




275,210 


239,059 


36,151 


182,325 


157,674 


24,651 


92,885 


81,385 


11,500 


PUBUC* 




















State 


366,873 


288,920 


77,953 


240,447 


184,898 


55,549 


126,426 


104,022 


22,404 


City 


124,948 


82,165 


42,783 


86,019 


54,171 


31,848 


38,929 


27,994 


10,935 


Countiest 


241,925 


206,755 


35,170 


154,428 


130,727 


23,701 


87,497 


76,028 


11,469 


NONPUBUC 




















State 


73,473 


70,785 


2,688 


60,934 


58,465 


2,469 


12,539 


12,320 


219 


City 


40,188 


38,481 


1,707 


33,037 


31,518 


1,519 


7,151 


6,963 


188 




33,285 


32,304 


981 


27,897 


26,947 


950 


5,388 


5,357 


31 



TEACHING STAFF 



PuBUC AND Nonpublic 




















State 


15,198 


12,558 


2,640 














City 


5,638 


4,200 


1,438 














Countiest 


9,560 


8,358 


1,202 














Public 




















State 


12,405 


9,860 


2,545 


6,880 


5,286 


1,594 


5,525 


4,574 


951 


City 


4,231 


2,861 


1,370 


2,522 


1,591 


931 


1,709 


1,270 


439 


Countiest 


8,174 


6,999 


1,175 


4,358 


3,695 


663 


3,816 


3,304 


512 


Nonpublic 




















State 


2,793 


2,698 


95 














City 


1,407 


1,339 


68 














Counties 


1,386 


1,359 


27 















NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 



Public and Nonpublic 




















State 


*1,281 


*979 


♦302 


1,139 


861 


278 


285 


239 


46 


City 


♦271 


*205 


*66 


235 


178 


57 


56 
229 


46 


10 


Countiest 


♦1,010 


♦774 


*236 


904 


683 


221 


193 


36 


Pubuc 




















State 


*953 


*670 


*283 


836 


575 


261 


219 


176 


43 


City 


*154 


*99 


*55 


123 


76 


47 


35 


27 


8 


Countiest 


*799 


♦571 


*228 


713 


499 


214 


184 


149 


35 






















Nonpublic 




















State 


*328 


*309 


*19 


303 


286 


17 


66 


63 


3 


City 


*117 


*106 


*11 


112 


102 


10 


21 


19 


2 




*211 


*203 


*8 


191 


184 


7 


45 


44 


1 



For basic data see TABLES I, V, and X. 
* Excludes duplicates. 

t Excludes enrollment, teaching staff, and number of elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



52 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



CHART 1 

Enrollment ir Public Schools by Color: Counties of Maryland 
and Baltimore City: 1923-1951 



225 



150 



100 



75 



50 



25 







)- 












1 

/ 

/ 














/ 

/ 

i 

—4- 


- 










/ 

^.^* 


/ 
/ 






Co 


jnties - Vhi 


:e 
























Baltimore C: 


.ty - White 
























Counties ■ 


Colored 








^ ^ 




^ BaltinK 


.^''^ 

re City - C< 


r- 

lored 










rrrrq 


1 i 1 1 


1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 



1923 1928 1933 1938 1943 19^8 1953 

Year 



Maryland State Department of Education 



53 



TABLE 4 — Enrollment in Public and Nonpublic Schools by Color: Counties of 
Maryland and Baltimore City : 1942-1951 





Total 


Public Schools 


Catholic Schools 


Non-Catholic 
Nonpublic Schools 


Year 
Ending 

JXJSK 30 


Counties*t 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties*t 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


WHITE ENROLLMENT 


1942 

1943 

1944 .... 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 

1951 


169,579 
172,317 
171,917 
174,113 
17'/ ,016 
181,278 
189,224 
201,124 
218,125 
239,612 


119,651 
118,800 
117,414 
115,289 
113,021 
112,648 
114,688 
116,220 
118,071 
120,646 


152,449 
154,701 
153,158 
154,502 
155,873 
157,992 
163,549 
173,701 
188,930 
207,308 


85,039 
84,389 
82,709 
79,552 
77,086 
76,471 
77,702 
78,762 
80,140 
82,165 


13,319 
13,770 
14,721 
15,192 
16,221 
17,069 
18,584 
20,189 
21,971 
24,720 


31,122 
30,809 
31,097 
31,783 
31,571 
31,608 
31,935 
32,457 
32,922 
33,250 


3,811 
3,846 
4,038 
4,419 
4,922 
6,217 
7,091 
7,234 
7,224 
7,584 


3,490 
3,602 
3,608 
3,954 
4,364 
4,569 
5,051 
5,001 
5,009 
5,231 



COLORED ENROLLMENT 



1942 


28,965 


34,487 


28,356 


33,047 


609 


1,377 




63 


1943 


28,769 


34,318 


28,137 


32,840 


632 


1,407 




71 


1944 


28,555 


34,804 


27,928 


33,189 


627 


1,539 




76 


1945 


29,061 


35,747 


28,431 


34,269 


630 


1,403 




75 


1946 


29,824 


37,034 


29,166 


35,465 


658 


1,476 




93 


1947 


30,882 


38,295 


30,032 


36,678 


750 


1,518 


100 


99 


1948 


31,717 


39,762 


30,875 


38,023 


783 


1,558 


59 


181 


1949 


33,039 


40,484 


32,226 


38,714 


792 


1,624 


21 


146 


1950 


34,531 


43,004 


33,628 


41,225 


879 


1,637 


24 


142 


1951 


36,257 


44,490 


35,276 


42,783 


960 


1,561 


21 


146 



* Includes enrollment in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates between counties in public schools. 



54 Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 5 — Enrollment in Public and Nonpublic Schools by Color — Type of School : 
Counties of Maryland and Baltimore City: 1942-1951 





Total 


Public Schools 


Catholic Schools 


Non-Catholic 
Nonpublic Schools 


Year 
Ending 
June 30 


Counties*! 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties*! 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 



WHITE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 



1942 


124,973 


94,438 


112,294 


65,123 


10,643 


26,703 


2,036 


2,612 


1943 


128,436 


94,780 


115,253 


65,904 


11,059 


26,104 


2,124 


2,772 


1944 


129,828 


94,497 


115,586 
116,611 


65,708 


11,797 


26,010 


2,445 


2,779 


1945 


131,549 


92,309 


62,969 


12,162 


26,322 


2,776 


3,018 


1946 


118,579 


79,779 


102,148 


50,482 


13,187 


25,883 


3,244 


3,414 


1947 


119,771 


79,458 


101,784 


49,707 


13,888 


26,214 


4,099 


3,537 


1948 


126,280 


80,947 


105,790 


51,073 


15,290 


26,000 


5,200 


3,874 


1949 


135,045 


82,871 


112,996 


52,406 


16,803 


26,661 


5,246 


3,804 


1950 


146,324 


84,335 


122,222 


53,280 


18,590 


27,236 


5,512 


3,819 


1951 


158,227 


85,689 


131,280 


54,171 


21,284 


27,692 


5,663 


3,826 



WHITE HIGH AND VOCATIONAL SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 



1942 


44,606 


25,213 


40,155 


19,916 


2,676 


4,419 


1,775 


878 


1943 


43,881 


24,020 


39,448 


18,485 


2,711 


4,705 


1,722 


830 


1944. . . . 


42,089 


22,917 


37,572 


17,001 


2,924 


5,087 


1,593 


829 


1945 


42,564 


22,980 


37,891 


16,583 


3,030 


5,461 


1,643 


936 


1946 


58,437 


33,242 


53,725 


26,604 


3,034 


5,688 


1,678 


950 


1947 


61,507 


33,190 


56,208 


26,764 


3,181 


5,394 


2,118 


1,032 


1948 


62,944 


33,741 


57,759 


26,629 


3,294 


5,935 


1,891 


1,177 


1949 


66,079 


33,349 


60,705 


26,356 


3,386 


5,796 


1,988 


1,197 


1950 


71,801 


33,736 


66,708 


26,860 


3,381 


5,686 


1,712 


1,190 


1951 


81,385 


34,957 


76,028 


27,994 


3,436 


5,558 


1,921 


1,405 



COLORED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 



1942 


23,853 


30,546 


23,244 


29,247 


609 


1,249 




50 


1943 


23,505 


30,553 


22,873 


29,245 


632 


1,253 




55 


1944 


23,337 


31,254 


22,736 


29,857 


601 


1,334 




63 


1945 


23,825 


31,753 


23,195 


30,503 


630 


1,179 




71 


1946 


22,824 


29,044 


22,166 


27,686 


658 


1,270 




88 


1947 


23,144 


29,448 


22,294 


28,018 


750 


1,334 


100 


96 


1948 


23,459 


30,539 


22,646 


28,996 


754 


1,375 


59 


168 


1949 


24,089 


31,033 


23,305 


29,466 


763 


1,421 


21 


146 


1950. . . . 


24,559 


32,661 


23,692 


31,121 


843 


1,402 


24 


138 


1951 


24,757 


33,367 


23,807 


31,848 


929 


1,380 


21 


139 



COLORED HIGH AND VOCATIONAL SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 



1942 


5,112 


3,941 


5,112 


3,800 




128 




13 


1943 


5,264 


3,765 


5,264 


3,595 




154 




16 


1944 


5,218 


3,550 


5,192 


3,332 


26 


205 




13 


1945 


5,236 


3,994 


5,236 


3,766 




224 




4 


1946 


7,000 


7,990 


7,000 


7,779 




206 




5 


1947 


7,738 


8,847 


7,738 


8,660 




• 184 




3 


1948 


8,258 


9,223 


8,229 


9,027 


'29 


183 




13 


1949 


8,950 


9,451 


8,921 


9,248 


29 


203 






1950 


9,972 


10,343 


9,936 


10,104 


36 


235 




"4 


1951 


11,500 


11,123 


11,469 


10,935 


31 


181 




7 



* Includes enrollment in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates between counties in public schools. 

For public and nonpublic enrollment in detail, see TABLES II, III, IV, and V. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



55 



TABLE 6 — Program for Education of Physically Handicapped Children in Maryland Financed 

with State Funds: 1950-51 



COWTY 



Total 



Pupils 



Expendi- 
tures 



Home Teaching 



Pupils 



Teach- 
ers 



Expendi- 
tures 



Transportation 
TO Regular 



Pupils 



Expendi- 
tures 



Instruction in Special 
Schools 



Pupils 



Baltimore 
City Hos- 
pital 
Schools 



Other 
Schools 



Expendi- 
tures 



Total State 

Baltimore City. 
Total Counties. 



Allegany .... 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 



Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . 
Frederick. . 



Garrett , 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's . . . 
Somerset .... 
Talbot 



Washington , 
Wicomico. . , 
Worcester . 



847 

330 

517 

56 
72 
106 
1 

3 

16 



♦$79,364.76 

22,934.70 

*56,430.06 

4,544.43 
6,964.06 
9,645.09 



315.23 

1,113.72 
1,015.40 
155.60 
700.65 
1,651.40 

773.09 
443.93 
699.40 
31.04 
12,350.98 

5,250.64 



1,063.00 
674.17 
349.441 

2,643.86 
2,128.14 
727.95 



465 

154 

311 

30 
35 
51 



190 

11 

179 

16 
12 

25 



$47,265.50 

9,108.00 

38,157.50 

3,326.93 
4,910.82 
5,115.79 



315.23 

1,039.54 
944.40 
155.60 
700.65 

1,519.40 

410.59 
443.93 
670.40 
31.04 
6,433.48 

4,827.14 



979.00 
590.17 
349.44 

2,643.86 
2,022.14 
727.95 



57 


$4,122.42 


9 


788.70 


48 


3,333.72 


18 


1,217.50 


1 


128.24 


10 


584.30 



74.18 
71.00 



132.00 
362.50 
' 29.60 
* 37.56 
423.50 



84.00 
84.00 



106.00 



271 
167 
104 

8 
12 
33 

1 



54 



54 



18 



$24,788.00 
tl3,038.00 
11.750.00 



1,925.00 
3,945.00 



5,880.00 



* Includes a nonallocable amount of $3,188.84 expended for State-wide clinical services and audiometric examina- 
tions. 

t Amount paid by State toward the salaries for the instruction of 271 children in Baltimore City hospital schools, 
of whom 167 were from Baltimore City and 104 from the counties. 



56 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 7 



Baltimore City Special Classes and Highwood School for Semester 
Ending June 30, 1951 



Kind of Class 


Number of 




Average 


Per Cent of 


Classes 


Net Roll 


Net Roll 


Attendance 


PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED WHITE PUPILS 


Total and Average 


26 


415 


412 


88.5 


Orthopedic 


12 


223 


230 


91.0 


Sight Conservation 


3 


43 


43 


84.6 




4 


51 


41 


92.0 


Deaf 


4 


42 


43 


86.0 


Mixed* 


3 


56 


55 


89.0 



PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED COLORED PUPILS 



Total and Average 


10 




142 




141 


84.3 


Orthopedic 


O 




76 




75 


89.0 


Sight Conservation 


3 




46 




46 


85.4 




1 




10 




10 


87.0 


Deaf 


1 




10 




10 


76.0 


SOCIALLY 


HANDICAPPED 


WHITE 


PUPILS 




Highwood School 


4 


69 


62 


81.0 



MENTALLY HANDICAPPED WHITE PUPILS 



Total and Average 


98 


1,842 


1,877 


79 


3 




61 


1,132 


1,117 


82 


3 


Special Center 


1 


16 


16 


83 


5 


Shop Center 


36 


694 


744 


72 


2 


MENTALLY 


HANDICAPPED COLORED 


PUPILS 






Total and Average . ^ 


94 


1,781 


1,711 


75 


7 


Opportunity 


54 


1,053 


954 


80 


6 


Si>ecial Center 


1 


12 


14 


70 







39 


716 


743 


76 


5 



* Junior high school class consisting of pupils with the following deficiencies: orthopedic, 32; sight, 7; 
cardiac, 9; deaf, 1; and hearing, 7. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



57 



TABLE 8 



Number of Pupils Reported Enrolled* in Maryland Schools and Institutions for 
Atypical Children: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



Xa>ie and Location 


Enbol 


LMENT 




Total No. 
of 

Different 
Teachers 


Nur 


jery 


Kin 
gan 


ier- 

;en 


Ele- 
mentary 


Secondary 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 



WHITE 



Children's Rehabilitation Institute, 




















Cockeys\ille 




3 


4 


3 


33 


26 






10 


Child Study Center, Baltimore 










30 


6 






4 


Garden School, Baltimore 










3 


8 






3 


Maryland School for Blind, Overlea 






4 


'7 


27 


24 


a 


12 


17 


Maryland School for Deaf, Frederick 






6 


11 


61 


44 


13 


5 


18 


Maryland Training School for Boys, 






























707 




326 




8 


Montrose School for Girls, Reisterstown . . 












74 




79 


13 


Nursery School for Cerebral Palsy, 




















Baltimore 


16 


9 














4 


Reinhardt School for Deaf, Kensington . . . 


1 


3 


6 


3 


8 


"9 






2 


Rosewood State Training School, Owings 




















Mills 






32 


18 


44 


42 






12 


School of the Chimes, Baltimore 






5 


1 


5 


4 






3 


Twin Maples, Baltimore 










10 


7 






2 


COLORED 


Barrett School for Girls, Glen Bumie 












118 




2 


9 


Boys' Village of Maryland, Inc., 




















Cheltenham 










216 








8 


Maryland School for Blind, Overlea 






4 




9 


12 


"i 


"2 


5 


Department for Colored Deaf 


i 




4 


"4 


17 


17 






9 



♦IFigures^fumished^by principals of schools. 



58 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 9— Total Resident Births in Maryland: 1941-1950 

Data from Bureau of Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



County 


REsroENT Births in Maryland 


1941 


1942 


1943 


1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 




37,126 


44,154 


47,353 


43,763 


42,816 


50,733 


56,827 


54,092 


54,048 


55,992 


Baltimore City. . . . 


15,995 


19,720 


21,054 


18,830 


17,848 


21,111 


23,992 


22,083 


21,496 


21,382 


Total Counties .... 


21,131 


24,434 


26,299 


24,933 


24,968 


29,622 


32,835 


32,009 


32,552 


34,610 


Allegany 


1,853 


1,912 


1,920 


1,689 


1,724 


2,257 


2,554 


2,160 


2,009 


1,803 


Anne Arundel . . . 


1,520 


1,831 


1,932 


1,857 


1,819 


2,164 


2,474 


2,603 


2,655 


2,873 




3,509 


4,749 


5,489 


5,112 


5,174 


6,140 


6,867 


6,375 


6,379 


6,661 


Calvert 


248 


258 


317 


280 


312 


313 


361 


395 


366 


400 




365 


348 


381 


349 


329 


387 


405 


420 


373 


417 


Carroll 


650 


750 


758 


667 


708 


860 


978 


887 


849 


771 


Cecil 


582 


570 


757 


682 


702 


804 


788 


790 


763 


756 


Charles 


548 


616 


661 


628 


605 


672 


686 


723 


723 


746 




470 


514 


491 


482 


462 


526 


613 


574 


555 


559 


Frederick 


1,109 


1,124 


1,183 


1,087 


1,141 


1,405 


1,478 


1,339 


1,377 


1,342 


Garrett 


531 


490 


504 


464 


424 


515 


568 


551 


541 


530 




748 


1,140 


1,168 


1,171 


1,090 


1,245 


1,385 


1,353 


1,379 


1,419 


Howard 


406 


414 


470 


420 


381 


477 


565 


546 


542 


569 


Kent 


243 


251 


259 


300 


246 


295 


327 


293 


299 


313 


Montgomery . . . 


2,218 


2,666 


2,773 


2,674 


2,694 


3,073 


3,411 


3,600 


4,000 


4,740 


Prince George's . 


2,325 


2,758 


3,131 


2,984 


2,992 


3,804 


3,996 


4,243 


4,563 


5,508 


Queen Anne's . . . 


254 


256 


248 


239 


260 


269 


289 


313 


326 


311 


St. Mary's 


376 


454 


540 


569 


708 


679 


736 


781 


824 


883 




402 


362 


393 


374 


357 


414 


484 


432 


417 


436 


Talbot 


332 


344 


323 


330 


330 


363 


425 


415 


418 


427 


Washington .... 
Wiconaico 


1,409 


1,562 


1,562 


1,504 


1,467 


1,730 


1,989 


1,791 


1,760 


1,697 


635 


657 


653 


671 


636 


741 


875 


892 


866 


894 




398 


408 


386 


400 


407 


489 


581 


533 


568 


555 



Maryland State Department of Educat on 



59 



TABLE 10— White and Colored Resident Births in Maryland: 1941-1950 

Data from Bureau Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



Resident Births In Maryland 



County 






















1941 


1942 


1943 


1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 1 1949 


1950 



WHITE 



Total State 


29,521 


35,911 


38,749 


35,554 


34,678 


41,401 


46,324 


42,651 


42,178 


43,599 


Baltimore City 


11,886 


15,076 


16,077 


14,021 


13,308 


15,805 


17,799 


15,414 


14,507 


14,168 


Total Counties .... 


17,635 


20,835 


22,672 


21,533 


21,370 


25,596 


28,525 


27,237 


27,671 


29,431 




1,821 


1,871 


1,887 


1,665 


1,691 


2,221 


2,524 


2,126 


1,976 


1,769 


Anne Arundel. . . 


1,080 


1,360 


1,487 


1,442 


1,392 


1,693 


1,943 


2,020 


2,034 


2,196 




3,275 


4,501 


5,155 


4,862 


4,751 


5,643 


6,328 


5,737 


5,766 


6,036 


Calvert 


112 


115 


147 


116 


^ 156 


137 


156 


179 


168 


148 




274 


250 


283 


265 


248 


302 


310 


323 


276 


319 




610 


686 


716 


626 


666 


816 


930 


840 


805 


725 




528 


521 


698 


638 


652 


748 


735 


717 


707 


695 




270 


343 


382 


341 


304 


386 


394 


405 


390 


407 


Dorchester 


299 


327 


318 


318 


298 


360 


412 


368 


324 


317 


Frederick 


972 


1,009 


1,067 


979 


1,029 


1,254 


1,338 


1,196 


1,233 


1,189 




531 


490 


504 


464 


424 


515 


565 


550 


541 


529 




662 


1,042 


1,081 


1,059 


994 


1,133 


1,244 


1,186 


1,202 


1,241 




325 


346 


383 


354 


317 


389 


477 


426 


443 


463 


Kent 


156 


155 


156 


210 


166 


214 


240 


216 


211 


231 


Montgomery . . . 


1,981 


2,443 


2,543 


2,459 


2,463 


2,771 


3,114 


3,289 


3,664 


4,402 


Prince George's . 


1,851 


2,276 


2,672 


2,532 


2,529 


3,273 


3,448 


3,605 


3,918 


4,775 


Queen Anne's . . . 


166 


164 


177 


170 


178 


196 


208 


213 


211 


200 




225 


282 


336 


388 


540 


475 


557 


564 


615 


659 




219 


218 


217 


209 


199 


256 


297 


256 


217 


240 


Talbot 


207 


196 


216 


210 


220 


235 


296 


271 


282 


290 


Washington .... 


1,378 


1,523 


1,530 


1,479 


1,451 


1,702 


1,950 


1,761 


1,726 


1,647 




452 


482 


492 


501 


471 


571 


684 


663 


633 


628 


Worcester 


241 


235 


225 


246 


231 


306 


375 


326 


329 


325 



COLORED 



Total State 


7,605 


8,243 


8,604 


8,209 


8,138 


9,332 


10,503 


11,441 


11,870 


12,393 


Baltimore City 


4,109 


4,644 


4,977 


4,809 


4,540 


5,306 


6,193 


6,669 


6,989 


7,214 


Total Counties .... 


3,496 


3,599 


3,627 


3,400 


3,598 


4,026 


4,310 


4,772 


4,881 


5,179 




32 


41 


33 


24 


33 


36 


30 


34 


33 


34 


Anne Arundel . . . 


440 


471 


445 


415 


427 


471 


531 


583 


621 


677 


Baltimore 


234 


248 


334 


250 


423 


497 


539 


638 


. 613 


625 


Calvert 


136 


143 


170 


164 


156 


176 


205 


216 


198 


252 




91 


98 


98 


84 


81 


85 


95 


97 


97 


98 


Carroll 


40 


64 


42 


41 


42 


44 


48 


47 


44 


46 


Cecil 


54 


49 


59 


44 


50 


56 


53 


73 


56 


61 


Charles 


278 


273 


279 


287 


301 


286 


292 


318 


333 


339 


Dorchester 


171 


187 


173 


164 


164 


166 


201 


206 


231 


242 


Frederick 


137 


115 


116 


108 


112 


151 


140 


143 


144 


153 


Garrett 














3 


1 




1 




86 


98 


87 


li2 


96 


li2 


141 


167 


177 


178 




81 


68 


87 


66 


64 


88 


88 


120 


99 


106 


Kent 


87 


96 


103 


90 


80 


81 


87 


77 


88 


82 


Montgomery . . . 


237 


223 


230 


215 


231 


302 


297 


311 


336 


338 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . . 


474 


482 


459 


452 


463 


531 


548 


638 


645 


733 


88 


92 


71 


69 


82 


73 


81 


100 


115 


111 


St. Mary's 


151 


172 


204 


181 


168 


204 


179 


217 


209 


224 


Somerset 


183 


144 


176 


165 


158 


158 


187 


176 


200 


196 


Talbot 


125 


148 


107 


120 


110 


128 


129 


144 


136 


137 


Washington .... 


31 


39 


32 


25 


16 


28 


39 


30 


34 


50 




183 


175 


161 


170 


165 


170 


191 


229 


233 


266 




157 


173 


161 


154 


176 


183 


206 


207 


239 


230 



60 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 11 — Per Cent of Attendance in Maryland Elementary Schools*: 
Years Ending June 30, 1950 and 1951 



County 


White Schools 


Colored Schools 


1950 


1951 


1950 


1951 




91 


5 


91 


9 


90 


1 


89 


8 


Baltimore City 


89 


5 


89 


6 


89 


4 


88 


6 


County Average* 


92 


3 


92 


8 


91 


1 


91 


3 


Allegany* 


95 


3 


95 


5 


97 





96 


6 


Anne Arundel* 


91 


5 


92 





91 





91 


8 


Baltimore* 


91 


6 


92 


1 


89 


8 


90 


7 


Calvert 


91 


5 


91 


8 


90 





88 


2 




93 


7 


95 


2 


91 


8 


93 


8 


Carroll 


93 


4 


94 


2 


88 


8 


90 


8 


Cecil 


91 


6 


91 


6 


90 


1 


90 


6 


Charles 


92 


1 


91 


4 


87 


4 


87 


5 


Dorchester 


93 


6 


94 


8 


92 


2 


92 


8 


Frederick 


93 




93 


4 


90 


3 


90 


8 




92 


5 


92 


6 










Harford 


91 


9 


92 




9i 


5 


9i 


8 


Howard 


92 


2 


93 





90 


9 


89 


9 


Kent 


93 


9 


94 


1 


92 


8 


93 


1 


Montgomery 


90 


8 


91 


6 


90 


8 


90 





Prince George's* 


92 


5 


92 


8 


92 


2 


92 


1 


92 


6 


93 


3 


95 


7 


95 


7 


St. Mary's 


91 


9 


91 


2 


88 


3 


87 


9 




92 


8 


94 


4 


92 


4 


92 


7 


Talbot 


93 


2 


94 


7 


94 


8 


96 


2 


Washington 


92 


7 


94 





94 


2 


93 
92 


9 


92 


9 


92 


9 


92 


6 


4 


Worcester 


91 


1 


92 


5 


90 


3 


90 


7 



For attendance in 1951 by type of organization, see TABLE IX. 

* Excludes attendance in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 



Frostburg 95 . 5 95 . 

Salisbury 92.9 91.6 

Towson 92.8 93.4 

Bowie 

Anne Arundel 88 . 4 88 . 6 

Prince George's 89.9 92.0 



Maryland State Department of Education 



61 



TABLE 12— Per Cent of Attendance by Type White Elementary School: 
Counties of Maryland: Years Ending 1950 and 1951 



County 



County Average . . . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Schools Having i Schools Having Schools Having 
One-Teacher ^ Two-Teacher Three-Teacher 
Organization ' Organization Organization 



Graded 
Schools* 



1950 


1951 


1950 


1951 


1950 


1951 


1950 


1951 


93.1 


93 


4 


93 





93 


3 


92 


6 


94 


2 


93 


6 


92.7 








96 


7 


97 





96 


5 


98 





95 


3 


95.4 








91 


9 


93 


7 


90 


1 


92 


3 


91 


6 


92.0 








89 


2 


90 


2 










91 


6 


92.1 








94 


8 


91 


9 


95 


3 


94 


3 


90 


8 


91.5 








93 


2 


94 


8 










93 


7 


95.2 








93 


6 


95 


6 










93 


4 


94.2 


94.5 


94 


7 


91 


7 


90 













91 


.5 


91.5 
























92 


1 


91.4 


94. i 


95 


.6 


92 


5 


94 


3 


94 


7 


94 


6 


93 


8 


94.8 


94.9 


95 


.1 


92 


3 


90 


9 


91 


5 


93 


.8 


93 


3 


93.5 


92.4 


91 


.9 


94 


1 


93 


.0 


91 


4 


93 


9 


92 


2 


92.6 


92.5 


95 


.1 


93 


1 


93 


7 


92 


4 


92 





91 


7 


92.0 


94.0 


94 


2 


92 


1 


91 


.2 










92 


.1 


93.0 








93 


5 


94 


.4 


93 


2 






94 


.1 


94.0 


92.9 


89 


i 


90 


7 


93 


.0 


93 


5 


93 


9 


90 


.8 


91.5 


93.4 


96 


9 


93 


5 


93 


9 


91 


5 


95 


.3 


92 


.5 


92.7 


92.9 


92 


8 


92 


6 


93 


3 


95 


2 


94 


5 


92 


.0 


93.1 


92.3 


93 


4 


91 


4 


91 


8 


92 


1 


92 


3 


92 


.2 


90.2 


94.7 


95 





93 


1 


93 












92 


.7 


94.4 


95.2 


95 





94 


4 


95 


6 


89 


5 


95 


3 


93 


.3 


94.6 


92.6 


93 


1 


93 


3 


93 


.7 


92 


7 


94 


7 


92 


.7 


94.0 








93 


5 


93 


9 


92 


4 


93 


6 


92 


.9 


92.8 








93 





94 


3 


92 


8 


94 


8 


90 


.6 


91.9 



* Excludes elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



62 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 13 — An Index of School Attendance in Maryland County Elementary 
Schools*: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



County 


White Schools 


Colored Schools 


Per Cent of 


Per Cent of 


Attendance 
t 


Late 
Entrants t 


With- 
drawals" 


Attendance 

1 ' 


Late 
Entrants+ 


With- 
drawals° 




92.8 


0.2 





4 


91 


3 


1.5 


0.5 




95 


5 


a 





4 


96 


6 




2.5 


Anne Arundel 


92 





0.2 





3 


91 


8 


1.8 


0.5 




92 


1 


0.1 





3 


90 


7 


0.6 


0.3 


Calvert 


91 


8 


0.6 





1 


88 


2 


3.7 


0.5 




95 


2 


0.1 





3 


93 


8 


0.3 






94 


2 


0.1 





3 


90 


8 




0.3 


Cecil 


91 


6 


0.1 





3 


90 


6 


'2.7 




Charles 


91 


4 


0.7 





7 


87 


5 


6.3 


'6.7 




94 


8 


0.2 





4 


92 


8 


0.9 


0.5 




93 


4 







3 


90 


8 




0.3 




92 


6 


■5'.2 





2 










Harford 


92 


1 


0.1 





4 


9i 


8 


i'.i 


o'.i 


Howard 


93 





0.3 





6 


89 


9 


0.2 


0.3 


Kent 


94 


1 


0.3 





3 


93 


1 


0.2 


0.2 




91 


6 


0.1 





3 


90 





1.9 


0.6 




92 


8 


a 





4 


92 


1 


0.9 


0.3 


Queen Anne's 


93 


3 







3 


95 


7 


0.8 




St. Mary's 


91 


2 


0.9 





2 


87 


9 


2.5 


'6!9 




94 


4 


0.2 





3 


92 


7 


0.5 


0.9 


Talbot 


94 


7 







2 


96 


2 


0.8 


0.3 


Washington 


94 





a 





7 


93 


9 








92 


9 


0.1 


' 1 





92 


4 


0.2 


0.8 




92 


5 


0.1 





7 


90 


7 


a 


0.8 



a Less than . 1 per cent. 

* Excludes elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 

t For per cent of attendance for all types of schools, see TABLE IX. 

X Late entrance for employment, indifference or neglect. 

® Withdrawal for causes other than removal, transfer, death or commitment to an institution. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



63 



TABLE 14— Per Cent of Attendance in Maryland High Schools* : 
Years Ending June 1950 and 1951 



County 


White Schools 


Colored Schools 


1950 


1951 


1950 


1951 


State Average 


92 


.6 


92 


1 


89 


6 




Baltimore City 


92 





91 


3 


89 


6 


88 2 




92 


8 


92 


4 


89 


5 


89 8 




95 


4 


95 


3 


95 


6 


95 .9 


Anne Arundel 


92 


1 


91 


9 


87 


7 


87 ^6 


Baltimore 


91 


7 


91 





91 


6 


91 .4 


Calvert 


92 


7 


91 


2 


91 


6 


89 8 


Caroline 


94 


5 


93 


8 


90 


7 


92 .8 
89 6 


Carroll 


94 


5 


94 





89 


1 


Cecil 


91 


2 


90 


5 


89 


8 


86 6 




92 





91 


4 


90 


3 


87 .9 




93 


9 


94 


1 


91 


8 


93 4 


Frederick 


93 





92 


1 


90 


1 


89^5 


Garrett 


91 


7 ' 


91 











Harford 


92 


9 


92 


7 


92 


3 


9i!5 


Howard 


93 


3 


93 


4 


90 


5 


89.1 


Kent 


92 


4 


92 


4 


, 93 


6 


91.6 


At ontgomery 


92 


5 


92 


7 


86 


8 


85.4 


Prince George's 


92 


3 


92 





91 





88.7 


Queen Anne's 


93 


1 


92 


1 


92 





94.2 


St. Mary's 


91 


6 


90 


1 


85 


9 


85.7 


Somerset 


94 





93 


8 


92 


1 


91.4 


Talbot 


93 


7 


93 


2 


92 


3 


92.2 


Washington 


92 


4 


91 


7 


93 


6 


93.7 




95 





94 


6 


91 


7 


91.2 




93 





92 


6 


92 





91.6 



* Includes pupils in vocational schools. 

For attendance in 1951 by type of organization, see TABLE IX. 



TABLE 15 — Number of Boys and Girls Enrolled by Grade-Color: Maryland County 
Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



Grade 


White and Colored 


White 


Colored 






















Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girb 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


234,115 


119,483 


114,632 


199,787 


102,148 


97,639 


34,328 


17,335 


16,993 


Kindergarten . . 


3,074 


1,582 


1,492 


3,074 


1,582 


1,492 








1* 


26,941 


13,967 


12,974 


22,898 


11,810 


11,088 


4,043 


2',i57 


1,886 




27,105 


14,234 


12,871 


23,127 


12,076 


11,051 


3,978 


2,158 


1,820 


3 


25,310 


12,994 


12,316 


21,412 


11,025 


10,387 


3,898 


1,969 


1,929 


4 


22,769 


11,760 


11,009 


19.000 


9,781 


9,219 


3,769 


1,979 


1,790 




21,396 


11,099 


10,297 


17,810 


9,231 


8,579 


3,586 


1,868 


1,718 


6 


19,914 


10,218 


9,696 


16,675 


8,615 


8,060 


3,239 


1,603 


1,636 


n 


20,052 


10,273 


9,779 


17,003 


8,813 


8,190 


3,049 


1,460 


1,589 


8t 

9 


18,020 


9,251 


8,769 


15,472 


7,990 


7,482 


2,548 


1,261 


1,287 


16,174 


8,222 


7,952 


13,947 


7,127 


6,820 


2,227 


1,095 


1,132 


10 


13,377 


6,425 


6,952 


11,603 


5,636 


5,967 


1,774 


789 


985 


11 


10,673 


5,079 


5,594 


9,461 


4,524 


4,937 


1,212 


555 


657 


m 


8,728 


3,988 


4,740 


7,744 


3,560 


4,184 


984 


428 


556 


Special Classes 


582 


391 


191 


561 


378 


183 


21 


13 


8 



Enrollment excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution; also 

enrollment in elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 
* Includes enrollment in junior first grade, 
t Includes enrollment in elementary and junior high schools. 
X Includes 7 white boys and 9 white girls who were post-graduates. 



64 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



I 



ooL Pupils in Year 




1 1 1 i«rSiissisSs=i|"^2i3§§ 






o 




1 
1 


05 


18,491 
4,544 
13,947 

1,312 
951 

2,550 
95 
206 
523 
399 
189 
247 
703 
331 
• 514 
251 
116 

1,466 

1,836 
154 
167 
160 
183 

1,078 
326 
190 


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Total state 

Baltimore City°. . . 

Total Counties . . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington .... 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



§S3 




I 




Maryland State Department of Education 



65 



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66 Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 18 — Causes for Nonpromotion of Maryland County White Elementary 
Pupils* Not Promoted by Year 1942-1951, and by County for 
Year Ending June 30, 1951 







Per Cent of Pupils Not Promoted by Cause 


Year 


Total 






idance 






city 




"a 




County 


Not 
Promoted 




c 


Atter 
e to 


ranee 


> 
O 


as 

a 

93 

« 

C 


ate H 
)ns an 
Inter* 


from 

Scho. 


usea 






Caus( 


rsonal 


egular 
ot Du 

icknesE 


te Ent 


Years 
mploy 


mtal I 


fortun 
onditi( 
ack of 


insfer 
nother 


ler Ca 






< 






ea 
_] 










O 



1941-42 


10,287 


9.6 


1 


1 


1.0 


0.2 


0.6 


1.1 


3.7 


0.6 


1.3 


1942-43 


11,255 


10.3 


1 


1 


1.3 


0.2 


0.6 


1.1 


3.9 


0.6 


1.5 


1943-44 


10,585 


9.8 


1 


1 


1.0 


0.2 


0.5 


1.0 


4.0 


0.5 


1.5 


1944-45 


8,083 


7.3 





9 


0.9 


0.1 


0.4 


0.7 


2.8 


0.3 


1.2 


1945-46t 


4,852 


5.0 





6 


0.4 


0.1 


0.2 


0.5 


1.9 


0.3 


1.0 


1946-47t 


3,040 


3.1 





5 


0.2 


0.1 


0.1 


0.3 


1.2 


0.2 


0.5 


1947-48t 


3,027 


3.0 





4 


0.2 


0.1 




0.4 


1.2 


0.2 


0.5 


1948-49t 


3,327 


3.1 





4 


0.2 


0.1 


! 


0.3 


1.2 


0.2 


0.7 


1949-50t 


3,003 


2.6 





4 


0.1 


0.1 


t 


0.2 


1.0 


0.1 


0.7 


1950-51t 


3,011 


2.4 





3 


0.1 


0.1 


t 


0.2 


0.9 


0.1 


0.7 



BY COUNTY 1950-51t 



Allegany 


243 


2 


9 





1 


0.1 


t 


0.1 


0.5 





8 


X 


1.2 


Anne Arundel 


386 


4 








3 


2 


0.2 




0.2 


2 


1 


0.2 


0.8 




336 


1 


4 





2 


0.1 


X 




X 





5 


0.1 


0.5 


Calvert 


16 


1 


9 





2 









7 




1.0 


Caroline 


69 


4 


4 





1 






o'.i 


0.8 


1 


3 


o'.i 


2.0 


Carroll 


120 


2 


7 





3 


0.3 






0.4 


1 


1 


0.1 


0.5 


Cecil 


82 


2 


6 





3 


0.3 


o'.i 




0.6 


1 





0.1 


0.3 


Charles 


101 


5 


9 





9 


0.6 






0.6 


1 


5 




2.4 


Dorchester 


32 


1 


7 





6 













9 


o'.i 


0.1 


Frederick 


36 





6 





1 








o'.i 





4 


X 


: 




46 


1 


5 





5 








0.1 





4 


0.5 


Harford 


124 


2 


4 





3 


o'.i 






0.2 


1 


2 


o'.i 


0.6 




125 


5 


9 





5 


0.8 


o'.i 




0.6 


2 


8 


0.7 


0.4 


Kent 


47 


4 


5 





4 




0.1 




0.4 


2 


5 


0.2 


1.0 


Montgomery 


407 


2 


2 





3 


o!i 


0.1 




0.2 





5 


0.1 


0.9 


Prince George's 


417 


2 


4 





3 


0.1 


0.1 




0.2 





9 


0.1 


0.9 


Queen Anne's 


60 


5 








3 










3 


9 




0.8 


St. Mary's 


70 


5 


9 





3 


0.6 


o'.i 






1 


4 


o.i 


3.5 




99 


7 


2 





4 


0.3 


0.4 




0.6 


3 


1 


0.1 


2.3 


Talbot 


32 


2 


3 





1 


0.1 


0.1 




0.1 


1 


5 




0.5 




46 





6 





1 


t 


t 




0^3 





3 




0.1 


Wicomico 


109 


3 


2 





5 




0.1 


o^i 




1 


5 




0.3 


Worcester 


8 





5 





1 








0.1 








0.3 



* Excludes pupils attending the elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t Prior to 1946 grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools were included with elementary school figures. 

X Less than . 1 per cent. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



67 



TABLE 19 — Causes for Nonpromotion of Maryland County Colored Elementary 
Pupils* Not Promoted by Year 1942-1951, and by County 
for Year Ending June 30, 1951 



Year 
County 



Total 
Not 
Promoted 



Per Cent of Pupils Not Promoted by Cause 



1° 



o 



°'2 S 
5 2c 



BY YEAR 



1941-42 


3,645 


16.2 


1.4 


3.1 


0.4 


0.9 


0.9 


7 


5 


0.6 


1.4 


1942-43 


3,891 


17.6 


1.5 


4.4 


0.3 


1.0 


0.9 


7 


5 


0.5 


1.5 


1943-44 


3,788 


17.2 


1.7 


4.2 


0.5 


0.8 


0.9 


7 


3 


0.7 


1.1 


1944-45 


3,464 


15.2 


1.2 


3.8 


0.4 


0.7 


0.8 


6 


8 


0.6 


0.9 


1945-46t 


2,491 


11.0 


1.2 


3.1 


0.3 


0.4 


0.5 


4 


5 




1.0 


1946-47t 


2,043 


9.4 


1.0 


2.3 


0.3 


0.3 


0.5 


4 


1 


0^3 


0.6 


1947-48t 


1,793 


8.2 


0.9 


1.9 


0.3 


0.3 


0.4 


3 


6 


0.2 


0.6 


1948-49t 


1,640 


7.2 


0.7 


1.4 


0.2 


0.1 


0.3 


3 


9 


0.3 


0.3 


1949-50t 


1,553 


6.7 


0.7 


1.2 


0.1 


t 


0.2 


3 


7 


0.3 


0.5 


1950-51t 


1,385 


6.0 


0.5 


1.1 


0.2 


0.1 


0.2 


3 


1 


0.3 


0.4 



BY COUNTY 1950-51t 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



4 


2 


5 




















2 


5 








210 


7 


3 





6 


1 


1 





3 





i 


o.i 


3 


9 





4 


0.7 


42 


1 


6 





1 





4 










X 





7 


t 


0.2 


79 


7 


6 





4 


2 


5 





i 





2 


0.4 


3 


1 





9 


0.1 


57 


10 


5 





2 


1 


1 





5 






0.4 


8 


1 





2 




5 


1 


8 




















1 


1 






0.7 


12 


4 


3 





3 


1 


i 












2 


5 






0.3 


187 


11 


4 


1 


3 


3 


4 





4 







0.4 


5 


3 





4 


0.2 


44 


4 


1 


1 


4 









3 








1 


3 






1.1 


14 


2 


2 





5 
















1 


7 








■ 37 


5 


4 









7 





3 








4 


i 





3 




34 


5 


7 





5 


1 


7 





5 






0.2 


2 


4 





3 


0^2 


28 


5 


9 





8 





6 












4 








4 




112 


6 


8 





8 


2 








2 





i 


0.4 


2 


9 





4 


o'.i 


256 


7 


5 





3 


1 








2 





1 


0.6 


4 


4 





6 


0.3 


3 





6 



























6 




69 


9 


6 





8 


3 


i 









3 




3 


6 





8 


l!6 


36 


3 


7 





2 


1 


4 





i 






O.i 


1 


1 






0.7 


66 


9 


1 





4 





5 





4 






0.3 


5 


5 





7 


1.2 


3 


1 


6 









5 










0.5 





5 








79 


6 


7 


1.1 









3 





2 


0.6 


4 


4 


t 


o!i 


8 





8 


0.3 



















1 






0.4 



* Excludes pupils attending the elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t Prior to 1946 grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools were included with elementary school figures. 

t Less than . 1 per cent. 



/ 



68 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 20 — Number and Per Cent of Nonpromotions in First Grade*: Maryland 
County Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



County 


White Schools 


Colored Schools 


First prade Nonpromotions 


First Grade Nonpromotions 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties: 
























1950 


789 


473 


6 


.5 


4 


3 


345 


196 


14 


6 


10.0 


1951 


748 


409 


6 


.3 


3 


7 


318 


181 


14 


7 


9.6 


Allegany 


54 


33 


8 


.3 


5 


1 












Anne Arundel 


106 


50 


10 


8 


5 


7 


46 


29 


16 


8 


12'3 


Baltimore 


90 


46 


4 





2 


2 


13 


8 


6 


2 


4.2 


Calvert 


7 


1 


10 


8 


1 


2 


18 


10 


16 


4 


13.0 


Caroline 


11 


8 


6 


9 


6 


3 


7 


5 


16 


7 


13.1 


Carroll 


26 


16 


6 


5 


4 


9 


1 


1 


6 


7 


4.8 


Cecil 


17 


8 


5 


1 


2 


5 


1 


1 


4 


3 


4.2 




24 


9 


14 


8 


5 


6 


37 


20 


22 





14.0 


Dorchester 


11 


5 


6 


5 


2 


7 


3 


5 


4 


2 


5.3 




17 


4 


3 


5 





9 




1 






1.9 


Garrett 


12 


12 


5 





5 


3 












Harford 


34 


28 


6 


8 


5 


4 


9 


3 


13 





5.9 




15 


10 


8 


5 


6 


4 


11 


9 


23 


4 


16.7 


Kent 


16 


10 


15 


5 


8 


4 


7 


1 


14 


9 


2.3 


Montgomery 


122 


65 


7 


1 


4 


2 


27 


24 


17 


9 


18.0 


Prince George's 


112 


57 


6 


2 


3 


3 


62 


25 


18 


3 


8.8 




9 


5 


6 


9 


4 


3 


2 




3 


5 




St. Mary's 


13 


11 


10 


3 


7 





16 


'7 


19 


3 


10 '.9 


Somerset 


1 


1 





8 





9 


14 


5 


14 


1 


6.7 


Talbot 


6 


7 


4 


6 


5 


2 


23 


6 


27 


7 


11.1 


Washington 


14 


10 


2 





1 


5 


1 


1 


5 


3 


10.0 




29 


9 


9 


9 


3 


4 


17 


20 


16 


7 


19.6 


Worcester 


2 


4 


1 


6 


2 


4 


3 




3 


4 





* Excludes pupils in first grade of elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges but includes pupils 
in junior first grade. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



69 



TABLE 21— Boys and Girls Under 21 Years of Age by Age-Color-Sex— Counties of 
Maryland: by Color-Sex — State of Maryland: School Census: October 1950 



Age 


Total Number 
Enumerated 


White 


Colored 


Grand 
Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 



Total State (5-18) 


457,392 






371,616 






85,776 






Baltimore City 




















(5-18)* 


141,582 






100,772 






40,810 






Total Counties 




















(5-18) 


315,810 


161,304 


154,506 


270,844 


138,789 


132,055 


44,966 


22,515 


22,451 


Total Counties 




















(20 or Under) . 


499,160 


256,061 


243,099 


430,233 


221,546 


208,687 


68,927 


34,515 


34,412 


20 


15,474 


8,241 


7,233 


13,103 


7,054 


6,049 


2,371 


1,187 


1,184 


19 


15,580 


8,190 


7.390 


13,210 


6,975 


6,235 


2,370 


1,215 


1,155 


18 


17,349 


8,911 


8,438 


14,602 


7,514 


7,088 


2,747 


1,397 


1,350 


17 


17,203 


8,809 


8,394 


14,541 


7,487 


7,054 


2,662 


1,322 


1,340 


16 


18,398 


9,291 


9,107 


15,483 


7,826 


7,657 


2,915 


1,465 


1,450 


15 


18,826 


9,551 


9,275 


16,011 


8,170 


7,841 


2,815 


1,381 


1,434 


14 


19,617 


10,153 


9,464 


16,677 


8,646 
8,606 


8,031 


2,940 


1,507 


1,433 


13 


19,853 


10,016 


9,837 


16,924 


8,318 


2,929 


1,410 


1,519 


12 


21,507 


10,917 


10,590 


18,224 


9,320 


8,904 


3,283 


1,597 


1,686 


11 


21,293 


10,833 


10,460 


18,059 


9,225 


8,834 


3,234 


1,608 


1,626 


10 


23,177 


11,931 


11,246 


19,761 


10,186 


9,575 


3,416 


1,745 


1,671 


9 


24,746 


12,586 


12,160 


21,230 


10,848 


10,382 


3,516 


1,738 


1,778 


8 


28,142 


14,396 


13,746 


24,385 


12,520 


11,865 


3,757 


1,876 


1,881 


7 


29,798 


15,311 


14,487 


26,082 


13,358 


12,724 


3,716 


1,953 


1,763 


6 


28,953 


14,696 


14,257 


25,271 


12,827 


12,444 


3,682 


1,869 


1,813 


5 


26,948 


13,903 


13,045 


23,594 


12,256 


11,338 


3,354 


1,647 


1,707 


4 


32,241 


16,502 


15,739 


28,477 


14,640 


13,837 


3,764 


1,862 


1,902 


3 


35,601 


18,291 


17,310 


31,604 


16,349 


15,255 


3,997 


1,942 


2,055 


2 


32,744 


16,891 


15,853 


28,411 


14,684 


13,727 


4.333 


2,207 


2,126 


1 


27,605 


14,196 


13,409 


24,033 


12,423 


11,610 


3,572 


1,773 


1,799 


Under 1 . . . . 


24,105 


12,446 


11,659 


20,551 


10,632 


9,919 


3,554 


1,814 


1.740 



* Baltimore City figures from Police Census. 



70 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



71 



TABLE 23 — Number and Per Cent of Children, Ages 7-15 Years Inclusive, by School Attendance 
—Public, Nonpublic, No School: Counties of Maryland: School Census: October 1950 



c=:_ . . 

County 


Total 


Number 


Per Cent 


Full Time 


Part Time 
in Public 
or Non- 
public 
School 


Not in 
School 


Full Time 


Part Time 
in Public 
or Non- 
public 
School 


Not in 
School 


In Public 
School 


In Non- 
public 
School 


In Public 
School 


In Non- 
public 
School 


Total and Average 






















100,100 


144,705 


15,192 


* 


6,238 


87.1 


9.1 


* 


3.8 




1 HT QQfi 


145,318 


17,382 


* 


5,298 


86.5 


10.3 


* 


3.2 


1 QA Q 


loUfOOO 


155,693 


20,434 




4,229 


86.4 


11.3 








jub.yoy 


180,508 


24,409 


58 


1,984 


87.2 


11.8 


t 


1.0 




13 957 


12,035 


1,844 


7 


71 


86.2 


13.2 


0.1 


0.5 




16',692 


15,162 


1,287 


11 


232 


90.8 


7.7 


0.1 


1.4 


Baltimore 


39,054 


31,475 


7,294 


11 


274 


80.6 


18.7 


t 


0.7 




2,416 


2,290 


59 




67 


94.8 


2.4 




2.8 


iJaroline 


2,812 


2,788 


6 




18 


99.2 


0.2 




0.6 


Jarroll 


6,150 


5,789 


290 


' 4 


67 


94.1 


4.7 


o'.i 


1.1 


Jecil 


4,718 


4,358 


325 




35 


92.4 


6.9 




0.7 


:harle8 


4,789 


4,045 


614 




130 


84.5 


12.8 


.... 


2.7 




3,844 


3,747 


8 


' i 


88 


97.5 


0.2 




2.3 




9,092 


8,236 


657 


10 


189 


90.6 


7.2 


0.1 


2.1 


Jarrett 


4,310 


4,149 


143 




18 


96.3 


3.3 




0.4 


larf ord 


7,566 


6,962 


532 




72 


92.0 


7.0 




1.0 


loward 


3,963 


3,335 


580 


' 5 


43 


84.2 


14.6 




1.1 


Cent 


1,930 


1,891 


18 




21 


98.0 


0.9 




1.1 


Montgomery 


23,458 


19,266 


4,113 




79 


82.1 


17.6 




0.3 


*rince George's . . . 


29,110 


25,305 


3,660 




145 


86.9 


12.6 




0.5 


2ueen Anne's 


2,312 


2,269 


21 




22 


98.1 


0.9 




1.0 


Jt. Mary's 


4,507 


2,251 


2,120 




136 


50.0 


47.0 




3.0 


Somerset 


3,064 


3,001 


6 




57 


97.9 


0.2 




1.9 


["albot 


2,834 


2,690 


115 




29 


94.9 


4.1 


.... 


1.0 


Washington 


11,727 


11,058 


598 


' 5 


66 


94.3 


5.1 




0.6 


Vicomico 


5,332 


5,131 


110 


4 


87 


96.2 


2.1 


0.1 


1.6 


I^orcester 


3,322 


3,275 


9 




38 


98.6 


0.3 




1.1 



♦ Part-time school attendants not reported prior to 1950. 
t Less than one-half of one-tenth of one per cent. 



72 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 24— Number and Per Cent of White Children, Ages 7-15 Years Inclusive, by School 
Attendance — Public, Nonpublic, No School: Counties of Maryland: School Census: 

October 1950 



L-OUNTY 


Total 


Number 


Per Cent 


Full Time 


Part Time 
in Public 
or Non- 
public 
School 


Not in 
School 


Full Time 


Part Time 
in Public 
or Non- 
public 
School 


Not in 
School 


In Public 
School 


In Non- 
public 
School 


In Public 
School 


In Non- 
public 
School 


Total and Average 




















1944 


139,723 


120,771 


14,505 


* 


4,447 


86.4 


10.4 


* 


3.2 


1946 


141,557 


121,081 


16,675 




3,851 


85.5 


11.8 


* 


2.7 


1948 


152,515 


129,887 


19,656 


* 


2,972 


85.2 


12.9 


* 


1.9 


1950 


177,353 


152,425 


23,508 


55 


1,365 


85.9 


13.3 


t 


0.8 


Allegany 


13,756 


11,834 


1,844 


7 


71 


86.0 


13.4 


0.1 


0.5 


Anne Arundel .... 


13,075 


11,720 


1,236 


8 


111 


89.6 


9.5 


0.1 


0.8 


Baltimore 


35,878 


28,361 


7,268 


11 


238 


79.0 


20.3 


t 


0.7 


Calvert 


1,140 


1,064 


58 




18 


93.3 


5.1 




1.6 


Caroline 


2,155 


2,137 


6 




12 


99.2 


0.3 




0.5 


Carroll 


5,812 


5,455 


290 


' 4 


63 


93.8 


5.0 


o'.i 


1.1 


Cecil 


4,332 


3,976 


325 




31 


91.8 


7.5 




0.7- 


Charles 


2,614 


2,144 


446 




24 


82.0 


17.1 




0.9 


Dorchester 


2,634 


2,572 


8 


■ i 


53 


97.7 


0.3 




2.0 




8,297 


7,475 


650 


10 


162 


90.1 


7.8 


0.1 


2.0 


Garrett 


4,310 


4,149 


143 




18 


96.3 


3.3 




0.4 


Harford 


6,672 


6,073 


531 




68 


91.0 


8.0 




1.0 


Howard 


3,125 


2,552 


535 


' 5 


33 


81.7 


17.1 


'6.2 


1.0 


Kent 


1,310 


1,281 


18 




11 


97.8 


1.4 




0.8 


Montgomery 


21,459 


17,293 


4,100 




66 


80.6 


19.1 




0.3 


Prince George's . . . 


24,638 


21,008 


3,550 




80 


85.3 


14.4 




0.3 


Queen Anne's 


1,654 


1,617 


21 




16 


97.8 


1.3 




0.9 


St. Mary's 


3,179 


1,435 


1,652 




92 


45.1 


52.0 




2.9 


Somerset 


1,841 


1,805 


3 




33 


98.0 


0.2 




1.8 


Talbot 


1,904 


1,783 


108 




13 


93.6 


5.7 




0.7 


Washington 


11,487 


10,821 


598 


' 5 


63 


94.2 


5.2 


o'.i 


0.5 




4,012 


3,832 


109 


4 


67 


95.5 


2.7 


0.1 


1.7 


Worcester 


2,069 


2,038 


9 




22 


98.5 


0.4 




1.1 



* Part-time school attendants not reported prior to 1950. 
t Less than one-half of one-tenth of one per cent. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



73 



TABLE 25 — Number and Per Cent of Colored Children, Ages 7-15 Years Inclusive, by School 
Attendance — Public, Nonpublic, No School: Counties of Maryland: School Census: 

October 1950 



County 




Number 






Per 








Full Time 


Part Time 




Full Time 


Par*- TimQ 






Total 






in Public 












111 X ULfll\. 


Not 


in 








In Non* 


or Non- 


XT 4- • 

Not in 






In Non- 


^?.'^~ 


School 






In Public 


public 


public 


School 


In Public 


public 


pUDllC 










School 


School 


School 




School 


School 


ocnool 






Total and Average 


























1944 


26 412 


23,934 


687 


* 


1,791 


90 


6 


2 


6 


* 


6 


8 


1946 


26^441 


24,287 


707 


* 


1,447 


91 


8 


2 


7 


* 


5 


5 


1948 


27,841 


25,806 


778 


* 


1,257 


92 


7 


2 


8 


* 


4 


5 


1950 


29,606 


28,083 


901 


3 


619 


94 


9 


3 





t 


2 


1 


Allegany 


201 


201 








100 















Anne Arundel .... 


3,617 


3,442 


"si 


■ 3 


121 


95 


2 


i 


4 


o'.i 


■3 


3 


Baltimore 


3,176 


3,114 


26 




36 


98 


1 





8 




1 


1 


Calvert 


1,276 


1,226 


1 




49 


96 







1 




3 


8 


Caroline 


657 


651 






6 


99 













9 


Carroll 


338 


334 






4 


98 


8 








1 


2 


Cecil 


386 


382 






4 


99 











1 







2,175 


1,901 


i68 




106 


87 


4 


7 


7 




4 


9 


Dorchester 


1,210 


1,175 






35 


97 










2 


9 


Frederick 


795 


761 


' i 




27 


95 


7 





9 




3 


4 


Garrett 


























Harford 


894 


889 


i 




' 4 


99 


4 





1 




6 


5 


Howard 


838 


783 


45 




10 


93 


4 


5 


4 




1 


2 


Kent 


620 


610 






10 


98 


4 








1 


6 


Montgomery 


1,999 


1,973 


i3 




13 


98 


7 





6 







7 


Prince George's . . . 
Queen Anne's 


4,472 


4,297 


110 




65 


96 


1 


2 


5 




1 


4 


658 


652 






6 


99 


1 











9 




1,328 


816 


468 




44 


61 


4 


35 


3 




3 


3 




1,223 


1,196 


3 




24 


97 


8 





2 




2 





Talbot 


930 


907 


7 




16 


97 


5 





8 




1 


7 




240 


237 






3 


98 


7 








1 


3 


Wicomico 


1,320 


1,299 






20 


98 


4 





i 




1 


5 


Worcester 


1,253 


1,237 






16 


98 


7 








1 


3 



* Part-time school attendants not reported prior to 1950. 
t Less than one-half of one-tenth of one per cent. 



74 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



5-© 

is 

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it ^ 
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«D t> i-H .00 00-* -ececotHt- . . K ,h n i-i n os »h 



a>C0t>O OS CO 05 «0 05 O rf OS OC M ^ 00 t- t- «> ^ Tji N 

rHt-UJO TfOON eOr-l .-I Irt >-( eO kO«> i-l -tC^rH 



05 00 eo ec o> t- <d • ih t> ec ec m in rn .(Nt> 
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ec eo lo lo 05 t-h oo lo ici-h tji ic ec t> oo ic o ;d o o i-i « i-h o i-h 

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O0t-t>00 THrH 1-1 



•coco -co . •«© . -co . . .NiH -t- 



iD^\nt£> 05 to C<1 0> »H CO O (M O CO . (N U3 CO CO lO O CO m .<t 05 CO 
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OS-^O-^ O «5 (N (N OS CO CO 05 • CS O O -t (N CO in 00 IC ?D tJ< 

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to 55 -w 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



75 



TABLE 27 — Handicapped Full Time School Attendants, Ages 7-15 Years Inclusive; 
Counties of Maryland: School Census: October 1950 



County 



Handicapped Full Time School Attendants 



Total 



White 



Colored 



Total 1944 

1946 

1948 

1950 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



986 
1,288 
1,699 
2.260 



247 

343 
25 
40 
78 
39 
26 
36 
78 
37 

168 
28 
39 
85 

140 
28 
36 

121 
54 

128 
25 
90 



787 
1,135 
1,514 
2,021 

367 
220 
322 
11 
34 
76 
39 
19 
28 
74 
37 
151 
27 
19 
84 
130 
25 
29 
62 
46 
127 
24 
70 



199 
153 
185 
239 

2 
27 
21 
14 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



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78 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 30— Graduates of Maryland County High Schools by Color-Sex- Year: 
1942-1951; by Color-Sex — County and Baltimore City: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



Year 
County 


White 


Colored 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


BY YEAR 


1942 


7,176 


3,165 


4,011 


*659 


*256 


*403 


1943 


6,741 


2,887 


3,854 


*689 


*271 


*418 


1944 


6,550 


2,493 


4,057 


718 


271 


447 


1945 


6,531 


2,545 


3,986 


755 


279 


476 


1946 


6,809 


2,641 


4,168 


740 


268 


472 


1947 


7,443 


3,244 


4,199 


937 


357 


580 


1948 


7,659 


3,417 


4,242 


889 


391 


498 


1949 


6,191 


2,800 


3,391 


780 


342 


438 


1950 


4,385 


2,148 


2.237 


415 


187 


228 


1951 


7,374 


3,385 


3,989 


905 


399 


506 



BY COUNTY AND BALTIMORE CITY, 1950-51 



Total State 


10,370 


4,926 


5,444 


1,722 


704 


1,018 


Baltimore City 


2,996 


1,541 


1,455 


817 


305 


512 




7,374 


3,385 


3,989 


905 


399 


506 




748 


329 


419 


13 


8 


5 


Anne Arundel 


462 


237 


225 


95 


41 


54 




1,162 


544 


618 


86 


35 


51 


Calvert 


5 


4 


1 


40 


16 


24 




133 


63 


70 


23 


16 


7 


Carroll 


287 


120 


167 


10 


3 


7 


Cecil 


190 


91 


99 


17 


10 


7 




102 


45 


57 


64 


27 


37 




133 


53 


80 


44 


24 


20 




382 


176 


206 


30 


13 


17 




182 


76 


106 








Harford 


305 


145 


160 


44 


25 


i9 




134 


69 


65 


29 


12 


17 


Kent 


77 


45 


32 


24 


14 


10 


Montgomery! 

Prince George's 


884 


391 


493 


63 


24 


39 


919 


429 


490 


93 


34 


59 




81 


27 


54 


26 


12 


14 


St. Mary's 


73 


31 


42 


11 


1 


10 




100 


53 


47 


50 


20 


30 


Talbot 


124 


52 


72 


29 


10 


19 


Washington 


584 


268 


316 


11 


6 


5 




183 


80 


103 


55 


25 


30 


Worcester 


124 


57 


67 


48 


23 


25 



* Includes Baltimore County graduates who attended Baltimore City high schools at the expense of 
Baltimore County. 

t Includes 27 boys and 9 girls, graduates of 1951 summer school. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



79 



TABLE 31— Number and Per Cent of High School Graduates Who Entered State 

Teachers Colleges Fall after Graduation: Counties of Maryland — 1942-1950: 
State of Maryland— 1950-1951 





White 


Colored 




High School 


Entrants to State Teachers 


High School 


Entrants to State Teachers 




Graduates 


Colleges Fall Following 


Graduates 


Colleges Fall Following 










Graduation 










Graduation 




Year 
































Number 


Per Cent 






Number 


Per Cent 




Boys 


Girls 










Boys 


Girls 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 




Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1942 . . 


3,165 


4,011 


37 


74 


1.2 


1.8 


*256 


*403 




*25 


3. . 


6.2 


1943 . . 


2,887 


3,854 


23 


88 


0.8 


2.3 


*271 


*418 


'8 


20 


4.0 


4.8 


1944. . 


2,493 


4,057 


15 


72 


1.7 


1.8 


271 


447 


6 


32 


1.5 


7.2 


1945 . . 


2,545 


3,986 


23 


118 


0.9 


3.0 


279 


476 


5 


37 


3.8 


7.8 


1946. . 


2,641 


4,168 


53 


151 


2.0 


3.6 


268 


472 


8 


28 


3.0 


5.9 


1947 . . 


3,244 


4,199 


121 


148 


3.7 


3.5 


357 


580 


11 


39 


2.1 


6.7 


1948. . 


3,417 


4,242 


105 


245 


3.1 


5.8 


391 


498 


8 


32 


5.0 


6.4 


1949 . . 


2,800 


3,391 


141 


249 


5.0 


7.3 


342 


438 


19 


66 


2.6 


15.1 


1950 . . 


2,148 


2,237 


51 


113 


2.4 


5.1 


187 


228 


5 


23 


2.7 


10. 1 


1951t. 


4,926 


5,444 


92 


198 


1.9 


3.6 


704 


1,018 


18 


117 


2.6 


11.5 



* Includes residents of Baltimore County who graduated from Baltimore City high schools after five 
years work above grade 7. 

t Increase due to inclusion of Baltimore City graduates and entrants to Coppin State Teachers College. 
For 1951 graduates and Teachers College entrants for individual high schools, see TABLE XXII. 



80 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 32 — Comparison of Number and Per Cent of Maryland County High School 
Graduates Continuing Education or Staying or Working at Home Year Following 

Graduation: 1942-1951 









Number 


Per Cent 


Year of 
Graduation 


Total Number 
of Graduates 


Continuing 
Education 


Staying or 
Working at 
Home, Married 


Continuing 
Education 


Staying or 
Working at 
Home, Married 




Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 



WHITE 



1941 


3,168 


3,870 


621 


1,006 


115 


773 


19 


6 


26 





3 


6 


20 





1942 


3,165 


4,011 


539 


832 


24 


540 


17 





20 


7 





8 


13 


5 


1943 


2,887 


3,854 


313 


953 


8 


434 


10 


8 


24 


8 





3 


11 


3 


1944 


2,493 


4,057 


338 


1,177 


12 


448 


13 


6 


29 








5 


11 





1945 


2,545 


3,986 


434 


1,232 


19 


587 


17 


1 


30 


9 





7 


14 


7 


1946 


2,641 


4,168 


601 


1,218 




420 


22 


7 


29 


3 


1 


4 


16 


9 


1947 


*3,255 


*4.205 


901 


1,268 


'77 


769 


27 


7 


30 


2 


2 


4 


18 


3 


1948 


t3,419 


4,242 


865 


1,282 


68 


277 


25 





30 





2 





6 


5 


1949 


2,800 


3,391 


787 


1,143 


78 


654 


28 


1 


33 


7 


2 


8 


19 


3 


1950 


2,148 


2,237 


655 


761 


42 


328 


30 


5 


34 





1 


9 


14 


7 



COLORED 



1941 


236 


444 


42 


76 


3 


75 


17 


8 


17 2 


1 


3 


16.9 


1942 


247 


385 


32 


89 


1 


77 


12 


8 


25.4 





4 


20.0 


1943 


263 


401 


26 


118 




46 


9 


9 


29.4 






11.5 


1944 


271 


447 


53 


145 


■ i 


52 


19 


6 


32.4 


6 


4 


11.7 


1945 


279 


476 


84 


183 


2 


59 


30 


1 


38.4 





7 


12.4 


1946 


268 


472 


60 


159 


9 


91 


22 


3 


33.7 


3 


3 


19.3 


1947 


357 


580 


67 


166 


14 


124 


18 


8 


28.6 


3 


9 


21.4 


1948 


391 


498 


82 


162 


13 


85 


20 


9 


32.5 


3 


3 


17.0 


1949 


342 


438 


74 


139 


12 


52 


21 


6 


31.7 


3 


5 


11.9 


1950 


187 


228 


51 


72 




60 


27 


3 


31.6 






26.3 



* Number of white graduates for 1946-47, as shown on TABLES 30 and 31 is not in agreement with 
number given on TABLE 32. TABLES 30 and 31 include the '46 summer school graduates of Mont- 
gomery County while TABLE 32 excludes these and includes the '47 summer school graduates instead. 
This was necessary because of a change in method of reporting summer school graduates. 

t Includes two boys who received diplomas after June 1948 and were not reported previously. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



81 





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82 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



Art or 

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88 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 40 — Enrollment* in Each Year of Maryland County High Schools: 

1942-1951 



Ybak 
Ending 




Grade 


Total 
















June 30 




7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


Post- 


















graduate 



WHITE ENROLLMENT 



1942 


39,316 






12,496 


10,440 


8,804 


7,515 


61 


1943 


38,394 






12.543 


10,087 


8,579 


7,161 


24 


1944 


36,797 






12,124 


9,764 


8,065 


6,833 


11 


1945 


37,154 






12,314 


9,842 


8,201 


6,783 


14 


1946 


51,922 


10,745 


6,397 


9,305 


10,090 


8,393 


6,967 


25 


1947 


54,886 


12,025 


11,667 


6,613 


8,043 


8,846 


7,629 


63 


1948 


56,524 


12,445 


12,448 


10,960 


5,571 


7,166 


7,897 


37 


1949 


59,500 


13,576 


12,950 


11,863 


9,718 


5,045 


6,314 


34 


1950 


65,312 


14,624 


14,010 


12,677 


10,866 


8,582 


4,505 


48 


1951 


74,321 


16,138 


15,428 


13,947 


11,603 


9,461 


7,728 


16 



COLORED ENROLLMENT 



1942 


5,009 






1,857 


1,450 


994 


708 




1943 


5,159 






1,865 


1,422 


1,088 


784 




1944 


5,083 






1,957 


1,333 


1,004 


789 




1945 


5,138 






1,804 


1,518 


1,016 


799 


. . 


1946 


6,899 


1,015 


818 


1,590 


1,475 


1,198 


803 




1947 


7,624 


1,238 


1,823 


1,186 


1,178 


1,178 


1,021 




1948 


8,173 


1,608 


2,128 


1,829 


639 


999 


969 


■ "i 


1949 


8,853 


1,821 


2,340 


1,857 


1,481 


521 


833 




1950 


9,766 


1,993 


2,448 


2,124 


1,551 


1,214 


435 


. . 


1951 


11,264 


2,519 


2,548 


2,227 


1,774 


1,212 


984 





* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 
For enrollment of individual high schools see TABLE XXII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



89 



TABLE 41 — Pupils Enrolled* in Various English Courses: Maryland County High 
Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



County 



English 





7t 


8t 


9t 


10 


11 


12 


Other X 


WHITE 


Total Counties 


16,011 


15,464 


14,018 


11,814 


9,668 


7,715 


2,068 


Allegany 


1,355 


1,350 


1,327 


1,131 


903 


772 


179 


Anne Arundel . . 


1,292 


1,114 


951 


779 


669 


507 


61 




O Q1 1 


2,913 


2,550 


2,031 


1,582 


1,203 
6 


Qse 

coo 


Calvert 


132 


107 


100 


78 


83 




Caroline 


230 


241 


205 


181 


141 


127 




Carroll 


655 


606 


524 


434 


362 


305 


97 


Cecil 


483 


417 


396 


337 


268 


209 




Charles 


231 


250 


197 


162 


159 


107 




Dorchester 


189 


276 


236 


220 


178 


159 




Frederick 


712 


845 


702 


619 


470 


395 


i3 


Garrett 


172 


371 


328 


281 


217 


204 


37 


Harford 


624 


574 


513 


447 


397 


314 


27 


Howard 


298 


250 


251 


195 


150 


138 




Kent 


177 


151 


125 


92 


104 


82 




Montgomery . . . 


1,892 


1,599 


1,468 


1,280 


1,125 


928 


374 


Prince George's 


2,138 


1,949 


1,866 


1,599 


1,297 


947 


27 


Queen Anne's . . 


206 


188 


158 


117 


86 


84 




St. Mary's 


102 


127 


170 


161 


110 


76 




Somerset 


182 


188 


171 


139 


119 


95 


56 


Talbot 


193 


198 


184 


162 


139 


128 




Washington .... 


1,192 


1,197 


1,086 


917 


746 


615 


i87 




341 


320 


298 


230 


188 


122 


Worcester 


245 


212 


190 


154 


133 


126 





COLORED 



Total Counties 


2,517 


2,551 


2.206 


1,774 


1,262 


948 


36 


Allegany 


18 


17 


21 


16 


14 


13 




Anne Arundel . . 


385 


317 


261 


190 


145 


116 




Baltimore 


378 


243 


189 


185 


98 


92 




Calvert 


117 


96 


80 


55 


49 






Caroline 


70 


69 


66 


56 


43 


24 




Carroll 


37 


28 


29 


19 


20 


11 




Cecil 


50 


39 


31 


34 


25 


18 




Charles . ; 


134 


135 


143 


76 


60 


70 




Dorchester 




116 


97 


76 


72 


48 




Frederick 


39 


55 


80 


44 


35 


35 




Garrett 
















Harford 


i03 


89 


95 


60 


57 


46 




Howard 


82 


81 


64 


57 


38 


30 




Kent 


71 


72 


55 


50 


26 


28 




Montgomery . . . 




158 


153 


133 


95 


67 




Prince George's 


48i 


412 


333 


257 


168 


106 




Queen Anne's . . 


75 


64 


47 


43 


26 


26 




St. Mary's 


74 


52 


60 


59 


36 


14 






125 


117 


107 


89 


66 


50 




Talbot 


113 


90 


68 


56 


40 


30 




Washington .... 


28 


27 


25 


24 


11 


11 




Wicomico 




137 


95 


106 


86 


62 




Worcester 


i37 


137 


107 


89 


52 


51 





* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in "TABLE XXIII. 

X Includes 712 taking Journalism; 697 taking Public Speaking; 556 taking Dramatics; 78 taking Radio 
Workshop; 46 taking English V; and 15 taking Business English. 



90 



Psy- 
chology 


,-( (£> t> lO to 


Business 
Training^ 




if 




Econom- 
ic Geog- 
raphy 




i 




Econom- 
ics and 
Consumer 
Ciducation 




Problems 
of 

Democ- 
racy 


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ill 


lllllilll 








i 




ii 


1 




World 
History 


liilllli 


sill 


8,168 
8,518 
8,379 
8,206 
6,452 
5,107 
9,334 
10,813 
11,311 
13,010 


11 


4 


it QQQ 

11,536 
12,343 
12,634 
14,751 
15,012 


7th 
Gradet 


. . . . 10,716 

12,953 

12,840 

. . . . 13,205 

14,597 

. . . . 15,769 


Year 

AND 

County 


1941- 42 

1942- 43 

1943- 44 

1944- 45 

1945- 46 

1946- 47 

1947- 48 

1948- 49 

1949- 50 

1950- 51 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



S :| :S :§ :S3 : :§S :52S 





S :2 : : : : : 


::::::§:: 


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: : : : : :^ : : 


: : :23 : : 



iiiilii 



Maryland State Department of Education 



91 



TABLE 43 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Social Studies: Maryland 
County High Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



Year 

AND 

County 


7th Gradef |. 


Studies 

-a 
6 


Civics and Social 
Studies 


World History 


European History 


United States 
History 


Problems of 
Democracy 


Geography 


Economic 
Geography 


Sociology 


Consumer 
Education 


Negro History 


Personal Problems 
and Psychology 


Business Training! 


1947- 


-48 


1,638 


2,044 


1,384 


645 


81 


928 


678 


252 


356 


83 


180 


79 


25 




1948- 


-49 


1,827 


2,312 


1,606 


1,092 


15 


858 


383 


186 


214 






141 


45 


77 


1949- 


-50 


1,995 


2,446 


1,704 


1,191 


18 


1,072 


499 


294 


128 






87 


130 


104 


1950- 


-51 


2,452 


2,461 


1,765 


1,406 


16 


1,156 


729 


320 


123 


129 


34 


112 


379 


59 



BY COUNTY, 1950-51 



Allegany 


18 


17 


21 




16 


27 


















Anne Arundel 


385 


317 


261 


188 




115 














li4 




Baltimore 


378 


243 


189 


186 




100 


92 
















Calvert 


117 


96 


78 


48 






39 
















Caroline 


70 


69 


66 


56 




43 


24 
















Carroll 


37 


28 


79 
























Cecil 


50 


39 


31 


34 




25 


is 












is 




Charles 


134 


135 




76 




60 


70 


143 














Dorchester 




116 




11 




71 


















Frederick 


39 


55 




44 




35 


35 


80 














Garrett 






























Harford 


38 


33 


34 


26 




i9 


2i 


















82 


81 


64 


54 




34 


30 
















Kent 


71 


72 


55 


50 




26 


28 
















Montgomery 




158 


153 


36 




94 


20 












48 




Prince George's . . . 
Queen Anne's 


48i 


412 


333 


239 




168 


87 
















75 


64 


47 


43 




26 


26 
















St. Mary's 


74 


18 


47 


47 




63 


46 


















125 


117 


107 


89 




66 


50 












89 




Talbot 


113 


90 


68 






40 


30 












30 




Washington 


28 


27 


25 


24 




22 






















137 




66 




70 


62 


97 






34 




29 




Worcester 


137 


137 


107 


89 




52 


51 












51 





* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIII. 

X Includes classes taught by teachers certificated in social studies; the remaining classes in this subject appear in 
TABLE 47. 



92 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



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^«oot-a>^i.':^c<jeot>M,-o>t-xo50-<S'XecT)'-^ 
(NX,-(c^weoec«oeot-c~'^Oit-xc^];oeoeoeo,-(CTsec 
oiaco TH^eo-^NiONTf ,-( »hu5 .-( ,-i ^ x 



iffl-^t-c^;cc~iox-*OT}iT}(Nin«it-->s'ioi«^T^c~N 

0005XOOS(NXCgO>t-'H»nO,-<ii5;000'*-^t-»^*<C 
^XO CJ'^«'-<cqevJNm(N,-(OX,-(^^,-(XeO,-( 



OOTj';Dt-,-(«Dt-0«0«aimO«HOOV-'5Xt>XXO-He>J 

X'-tooTfo-HTft-ecoit-miooiNXMXosojTi"^ 

eO_^^_^X^,-( Cg;OTt(NNt-'Hif5N»^ "-I OS ec (N 



uiooomcgiceo-^osx •Tj'xuj-'frHeoeoMeoin 

eO X IC X ->t X •(N05t>IN,-(OOX<JSO -IN 
eOOX,-(M«5iS<NjqX • so Tf in (N ,-. o 



•T3 

e 



bSf-< 

S o ( 



Maryland State Department of Education 



93 



TABLE 45 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Science: Maryland 
County High Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1951 





Science 
































8 


















u 












g 






Year and 






c 

S 




c 


c 
.2 






a 






County 


■ % 


0) 
T3 


*0 




"C 


*5 
w 


b 




S 
'S 


s 






Grai 


Gra( 


eral 


>» 

M 

O 


1 


lied 


mist 


sics 


u 

o 


a 
IS 


++ 

J3 




t- 


JS 

00 


Gen 


Biol 


Eels 


a 
< 


Che 


Phy 


Seni 


Mac 


j Hea 


1947-48 


1,353 


1,864 


1,409 


664 


26 


243 


639 


298 


241 


21 


181 


1948-49 


1,543 


1,911 


1,544 


1,265 


78 


89 


549 


156 


279 




33 


1949-50 


1,741 


2,167 


1,528 


1,190 


57 


157 


581 


307 


92 




61 


1950-51 


1,557 


1,733 


1,919 


1,673 


130 


201 


771 


403 


172 




92 






BY 


COUNTY, 1950-51 










Allegany 


18 


15 


23 


16 








13 








Anne Arundel 






267 


118 






li9 


40 










378 


243 


189 


185 






83 










Calvert 


117 


96 


80 


43 








i9 








Caroline 


70 


69 


66 


56 






43 


24 








Carroll 


37 


28 


29 


19 










31 






Cecil 


50 


39 


31 


32 






25 










Charles 


135 


138 


142 


76 






27 




60 






Dorchester 




116 




79 






60 




16 






Frederick 


39 


55 


SO 


36 






8 


































Harford 




33 


95 


98 






42 












83 


81 


38 


58 






22 


is 








Kent 


71 


72 


25 


50 


30 




26 


28 








Montgomery 




156 


154 


100 


69 




16 


20 








Prince George's 


120 


85 


185 


256 






76 










Queen Anne's 


75 


64 


47 


43 






26 


26 








St. Mary's 


74 


34 


66 


44 


3i 






46 










40 


45 


107 


89 






66 


50 








Talbot 


113 


90 


69 


56 






40 


30 








Washington 






24 


24 






22 










Wicomico 




i37 


95 


106 






70 


4i 








Worcester 


i37 


137 


107 


89 




102 




53 









* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIII. 
X If given in other than 7th and /or 8th grades. 



94 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



Commer- 
cial and 
Business 
Arith- 
metict 


O Oi W O N 00 OS »-i«> W 


Vocational 
and 
Applied 
Mathe- 
matics 


ifla>oooooi-c«f«ooeo 
ooo50'«J<^icooecoeo 


Mathe- 
matics 
Review 




Solid 
Geometry 


<CO'<l<t>eC«0t-O'Hr-l 


Trigono- 
metry 


t>'*««t-e<5ooooi>Ti< 


Plane 
Geometry 


eC 0^(N « W 0_(N 1-H (N -^^^ 

cococccocccococ^coco 


Algebra II 


t-t>ow«i<t-oot-t-ec 
t-^ 05 00 00 u3 ec t> 


Algebra I 


00'tfO>0(MTl<«CiTfO>(N 

''l *^ *l *i 

ift IC ^ ;C TjT eo "5 i« 


General 
Mathe- 
matics II 


05050>«0'<i<eO«00(M 
''l*^'^'^'''."^'^ CO 


General 
Mathe- 
matics I 


«cxoe<5io«0'^Nu:)C<i 

<o i> eo 00 «5 CO 

t-* t> «r t-* U5 ec t> 00 00 o 


Mathematics 


8th Gradet 


• • • • N OS T-i ec OS 

• • • • N 00 OS iM ec eo 

. . . .Tj*_t>Tt 00 o« 

• ■ ■ •;C.-r(N(N'>f U3 


7th Gradet 


• • • • c<j t> eo o ifl « 
. . . • Tit o «o OS ec 

* ■ ■ ■'^'1'^*^'^*'. 
■ ■ ■ 'ocS<>Sm'^v> 


Year 
AND County 


n" CO ""f' in" (6 1> 00 OS o 1-1 

»-(C^eo-^io«oc^oooso 
osososososososososos 



oooco -ininM -ooseot^oosOiH^t-osto 
oot-co -iHTfTi" -^CTHcoosm os t- ih n 
CO • »H • 



eoeoiHooeoeoicoc^JC^iHtxcoomw^rHC^itot-Nt- 
cox<NC<j»-ioo;0'^Nin»HT)<THeo«>oco(N.HNTfoo(N 

COrHin C<liHrH CO 



OCO'-imt>lOTj<i-lt-05'-INOS»H.H»-lt>'^'!j';0't}<iO«e 

m«D(NiNooi-ios->!}tt-«0'^eO'<i'(N»HioiceO'^eot>0(N 

NtHCO IrtCO iHtH 



t>OOeOrHi-l.-IC^t-t>U5W<OOOOS«>lCt-IMOSt>i-lO(N 

if5«eoeoeooict-ooN'H;cit-co-^iOT)<t>-«t«oooeo'* 
imcoos '-ic^i-i <N»-ti-i osoo 



lOSlAOOOSO 



lOC<IOS«CeOI>OOOU5N03M'<l'OOt-iHOOOOOOt~OOinOS 
005OIO tH 00 eO '-I i-t ■>!• <N «C (N OS rH rH 1-H r-( t> r-( .H 



00'«S<C0t-C<J00^O«iu:ii-l-^O0500IN'Ht-00 0Ct-0SM 

Tj<iHi-H©woo'^t-oc-t-ioeoos'^osc<iooosoeO'-H 
cO'-iosTHT-t«>-«i<c<ic<jooeoiONT-i os ih ih ih th c^co w 



tfiN>HlO»-liniC0'-"OSN;OC000m<C00«CmC0C0N 

eoosi-ic^osin«o->i<ooi-it>MOst-'4'oooeoooo5ic 

C0CJC0rHCvJ«OTl<M(MC-T-i;O(N»H00NW»Hi-liHN 



§2 



OJ 01 O Cfl ^" y 



t: ^ c g c s-^ c£ s s ^ 



Maryland State Department of Education 



95 



TABLE 47 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Mathematics and 
Business Education: Maryland County High Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



Year and 
County 


Math( 
« 

S 
c 

JS 


B 

8th Grade | 


General 
Mathematics I 


General 
Mathematics II 


Algebra 


Plane Geometry 


Trigonometry 


j Mathematics Review 


Vocational and 
1 Applied Mathematics 


Commercial and 
Business 
Arithmetic 


Business 
Educationt | 


1947- 


-48 


1,612 


1,962 


1,222 


195 


921 


319 


58 


344 


356 


422 


229 


1948- 


-49 


1,819 


2,229 


1,396 


123 


1,001 


311 


35 


329 


176 


380 


386 


1949- 


-50 


1,995 


2,331 


1,467 


187 


1,028 


330 


14 


394 


145 


556 


474 


1950- 


-51 


2,471 


2,500 


1,459 


382 


1,153 


449 


19 


325 


513 


584 


656 



BY COUNTY, 1950-51 



Allegany 


18 


17 






24 








7 






Anne Arundel 


389 


314 




168 


129 


32 


io 


73 


101 


29 


62 




378 


243 


i89 




109 


71 






92 


29 


143 


Calvert 


117 


96 


43 




16 


7 












Caroline 


70 


69 




64 


29 


24 




24 




i9 


27 


Carroll 


37 


28 


29 


20 




11 








19 




Cecil 


50 


39 


25 












42 


25 






133 


135 


143 




36 






54 




76 


63 






116 


98 


99 




22 










34 


Frederick 


39 


55 


80 




8 


10 




25 






44 


Garrett 
























Harford 


ios 


89 


95 




34 






44 


38 




i9 


Howard 


82 


81 


63 




45 












100 


Kent 


71 


72 


55 




38 


ii 








25 








157 


67 




121 






12 


24 


33 


4i 


Prince George's 


432 


384 


264 




140 


73 




72 


86 


44 


80 


Queen Anne's 


75 


64 


47 




52 










43 




St. Mary's 


74 


34 


47 


3i 


57 


33 








19 


6 


Somerset 


125 


116 


107 






29 




21 


30 


66 




Talbot 


113 


90 






56 


40 








69 




Washington 


28 


27 






47 








24 






Wicomico 




137 






96 


60 






69 


35 


37 




i37 


137 


ioi 




116 


26 








53 





* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 

t Includes pupils taking shorthand, typing, bookkeeping, and business training. Also see TABLE 43. 



96 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 48 — White Pupils Enrolled* in the Foreign Languages: Maryland County 
High Schools: Years Ending June 30, 1942 to 1951 



Year Ending 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


June 30 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1942 


1,856 


3,032 


1,168 


2,197 


163 


194 


1943 


1,755 


2,845 


875 


1,852 


296 


460 


1944 


1,767 


2,927 


719 


1,652 


384 


736 


1945 


1,825 


2,986 


877 


1,645 


452 


762 


1946t 


1,721 


2,629 


915 


1,738 


446 


743 


1947t 


1,412 


2,227 


903 


1,652 


526 


712 


1948t 


1,282 


2,042 


832 


1,541 


455 


623 


1949t 


1,364 


2,086 


786 


1,295 


559 


745 


1950t 


1,684 


2,436 


937 


1,356 


720 


854 


1951t 


1,575 


2,369 


968 


1,492 


792 


949 



TABLE 49 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in the Foreign Languages: Maryland County 
High Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1951 





Latin 




French 


Spanish 


Year and 
















County 


















Boys 




Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1947-48t 


23 




29 


22 


59 


1 


20 


1948-49t 


16 




18 


45 


103 


4 


36 


1949-50t 


22 




28 


90 


106 


13 


32 


1950-51t 


28 




49 


63 


136 


25 


68 



BY COUNTY, 1950-51 



Anne Arundel . . . 


3 


4 


11 


34 


15 


45 


Baltimore 






43 


37 






Dorchester 








23 






Montgomery .... 






'7 


30 






Prince George's . 










io 


23 


Washington 






'2 


12 








25 


45 











* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Figures include duplicates, if there are any. 

For 1951 enrollment in individual high schools see TABLE XXIII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



97 



TABLE 50— White Pupils Enrolled* in Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home 
Economics: Maryland County High Schools: Years Ending June 30, 1942 to 1951 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Industrial 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


Arts 


Education 


General 


Vocational 


1942 


10,522 


1,100 


2,291 


9,850 


3,603 


1943 


' 10,731 


1,244 


2,192 


9,674 


3,518 


1944 


8,904 


1,083 


2,014 


9,776 


2,888 


1945 


8,813 


1,072 


1,511 


9,689 


2,841 


1946t 


12,964 


1,134 


1,779 


14,093 


2,664 


1947t 


14,090 


1,227 


2,110 


14,833 


2,261 


1948t 


15,414 


1,119 


2,629 


16,165 


1,596 


1949t 


17,744 


982 


2,822 


16,707 


2,300 


1950t 


21,619 


1,488 


3,199 


18,989 


2,532 


1951t 


24,739 


1,538 


4,174 


20,667 


2,566 



TABLE 51 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home 
Economics: Maryland County High Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



Year and 
County 


Industrial 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


Arts 


Education 


General 


Vocational 


1948t 


1,533 


221 


1,084 


2,277 


1,068 


1949t 


1,599 


282 


1,247 


2,533 


1,275 


1950t 


2,099 


204 


1,083 


2,929 


1,023 


1951t 


2,815 


341 


1,265 


3,333 


1,168 






BY COUNTY, 


1950-51 






Allegany 


24 


35 




14 


21 


Anne Arundel . . . 


199 


161 


9i 


477 


125 


Baltimore 


357 






410 


11 


Calvert 


86 




loi 


84 


74 


Caroline 


79 




55 


62 


61 


Carroll 


38 


39 




27 


40 


Cecil 


84 




38 


26 


70 


Charles 






193 


156 


76 


Dorchester 


lio 




85 


110 


62 


Frederick 


132 






90 


27 














Harford 


216 






143 


89 


Howard 


155 




55 


34 


74 


Kent 


138 




48 


124 


8 


Montgomery .... 


141 


7i 


50 


184 


38 


Prince George's . . 


409 




180 


556 


202 


Queen Anne's. . . . 


133 




120 


66 


82 


St. Mary's 


40 




69 


71 


62 


Somerset 


189 






216 




Talbot 


94 


35 


7i 


135 


46 


Washington 


58 






68 




Wicomico 


133 




45 


205 




Worcester 






64 


75 





* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes duplicates, if any. 

For 1951 enrollment in individual schools, see TABLE XXIII. 



98 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 52— White Pupils Enrolled* in Music, Art, and Physical Education: 
Maryland County High Schools: Years Ending June 30, 1942 to 1951 



Year Ending 


Music 


Art 


Physical Education 


June 30 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girb 


Boys 


Girls 


1942 


8,652 


12,064 


2,536 


3,072 


10,534 


11,016 


1943 


8,011 


11,335 


1,919 


2,407 


12,063 


13,277 


1944 


7,743 


11,362 


1,888 


2,298 


12,501 


14,695 


1945 


7,654 


11,217 


1,782 


2,199 


12,507 


14,457 


1946t 


15,304 


18,981 


7,104 


7,564 


20,211 


21,212 


1947t 


16,777 


20,114 


8,745 


8,623 


22,517 


22,585 


1948t 


19,624 


22,866 


10,058 


10,058 


24,631 


24,414 


1949t 


21,929 


24,141 


10,471 


10,435 


27,211 


26,769 


1950t 


23,800 


26,374 


11,940 


11,513 


30,049 


29,236 


1951t 


26,806 


29,276 


12,889 


12,853 


34,094 


32,955 



TABLE 53 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Music, Art, and Physical Education: 
Maryland County High Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1951 







Music 


Art 


Physical Education 


Year Ending 
















June 30 


















Boys 




Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1948t 


3,017 




3,584 


823 


777 


3,154 


3.503 


1949t 


3,322 




3,844 


1,217 


1,054 


3,717 


4.354 


1950t 


3,552 




4,051 


1,301 


1,166 


4,147 


4,504 


1951t 


4,624 




5,133 


1,601 


1,712 


5,046 


5,656 



BY COUNTY, 1950-51 



Allegany 


47 


36 






9 


9 


Anne Arundel. 


624 


667 


239 


210 


595 


668 


Baltimore .... 


528 


672 


448 


488 


541 


639 


Calvert 






10 


20 


182 


206 




165 


163 


30 


40 


,164 


163 


Carroll 


77 


67 


37 


41 


77 


67 


Cecil 


91 


108 






101 


96 


Charles 


268 


351 


48 


52 


250 


334 


Dorchester . . . 


133 


118 






209 


206 


Frederick 


150 


138 


is 


2i 


150 


138 


Garrett 














Harford 


2i6 


232 


59 


62 


2i6 


232 


Howard 


169 


168 






174 


174 


Kent 


145 


157 






145 


157 


Montgomery. . 


175 


194 


60 


5i 


265 


297 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's 


650 


788 


497 


554 


791 


957 


156 


177 






133 


148 


St. Mary's .... 


91 


124 


22 


22 


91 


124 


Somerset 


232 


228 


23 


17 


273 


278 


Talbot 


190 


161 






197 


198 


Washington . . . 


58 


68 


34 


46 


58 


68 


Wicomico .... 


179 


223 






145 


204 


Worcester .... 


280 


293 


76 


88 


280 


293 



* Excludes duplicates and withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes duplicates, if any, and enrollment from junior high school classes (7, 8, 7-8) in addition to 
last four years as previously reported. 

For 1951 enrollment in individual high schools see TABLE XXIII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



i 



I 



It 



il 



o 

I 



If 



If 



I! 



i 



If 



I 



< o 



SSI 



ipplilll 



iisiiiiiii 



illlllill 



llllllllll 



.Slilill 



lilllill 



ilia 



iiiiijijiiliii 



100 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



Tilt 5 



c2 

e t * 

"IS 



•05 oo -omiMa; 



lO o « • 



> 2 




"•SI 



OCX • c^w* 



t- N 00 05 t> CO 

Tj" Oi » 00 OJ ^ 
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S 



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c.s 



^1 
o 



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mix 



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c 



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■ PQ 



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5 • a 
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w w w S 



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c5 
^ k. v 



• t- • ■ eg o 



• OC • TtOi 



•■«i«Wi-io;e 



•rH(N i-t.-l 




Maryland State Department of Education 



101 



TABLE 56 — Enrollment in Driver Education and Training: Maryland County High 
Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1951 





Enrollment in Driver 
Education and Training 




Enrollment in Driver 
Education and Training 


County 


Boys 


Girls 


County 


Boys 


Girls 



WHITE SCHOOLS 



Total 

Allegany .... 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore. . . 
Caroline. . . . 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Garrett 

Harford 



1,220 


1,769 


Howard 


52 


68 








125 


244 


157 


220 


Prince George's ......... 


130 


234 


50 


116 


Talbot 


45 


75 


187 


117 


Washington 


63 


126 


13 


20 


Wicomico 


103 


124 


43 


97 


Worcester 


51 


61 


8 


28 








71 


83 








122 


156 









COLORED SCHOOLS 



Total 

Allegany .... 
Anne Arundel 
Howard 



175 

15 
13 
17 



188 

13 
12 
30 



Prince George's 

Talbot 

Wicomico 



102 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



S3® 



o « 



ti o 

O « 





0. of 




(M (NU5T-I00 

* • 





■ -eo -iH . . . . . . 


E5 Boys 


z 




eo CO 05 i-H i-H 
000 






[ Grad] 


ig Folk 
Sub 




• • -COIN-* 




■•^(£) . . .,H • •« • -tH -OS-* -i-tlN -OS • • 


WELFTH 


Failii 




00 to 05 
• • • 1-1 ca 

l> to t- N tH 




eocotD • -t-cc -0305 -osin • n os in tj< rf tj< 03 (M 

CO ^ • * • ■ CO 'H 




Total 
rail- 


to 


10 C- in (N 

o> t> 00 c<i th CO 




eot>oo •.Ht--<i< -COIN • 05 1> 00 rji (N (N CD Tj< 00 CO eo 
iNco in • ■ th • CD T}< i-H 


m 


swing No. of 
jects 




«> t> eo i-H 

1— 1 




tHMCOIN -co -i-Hi-l -rH • ,H ■ CD t> 


rH Grade Boy 




• • • ec in in 




ininoo -IN-*,-! • • • -inth -Tfo -inth -eot-i • 


ng Foll( 
Sub 


(M 


<N iH t> 01 t- 

00 




(N t> CO N r-t iH iH IN 0> CD CO tH Tji M eo r-l iH 05 • 

iNi-ic^i eoeo iH 


Jleveni 


Faili; 




oiMOOiint- 

■ • 50005 
rH ^ 


in 


ooooto • CD w in eo eo N CO t- N N -"t 1-1 in eo IN 05 

■^TjtO - l-l 1-1 tH 00 00 INtH 




Total 
Fail- 
ing 


CC ^ 

• • • eo .-H t> 
in 1— 


r 


in 
o> 


coo5t>ino-«j<t-incoeo'^-«*(NcocDc<ieooincoiN^'i< 

t-COTj< i-l(N IN (NiH COCO tH tJ<(N 




0. of 


■<i< 


o> wo-^inin 
■ • • X o> in 


UNTY, 


INCOt- -i-li-l -i-IINCO -i-liH -inoO • --r)! -co • • 


Boys 


wing N 
ects 


CO 


^ (N 
Cvl M N T-t r-l 



>H 


cooj-^eo -cocoiow^ • t> ih n 00 co (n in in co t- • 


Grade 


g Folio 
Subj 




in eo «o •'f '-I 
T)< eo N N 


NUMBER ; 


cocot> • iH CO 00 th T-( Tj< -oi • -eooo • 05 in in t)< eo ih 

tH,-IM • ,-1 ■ • -INCO • Wr-i 


Tenth 


Failin 




0(5>l>t-000 
N ^ in <0 5D 


co"*eoiHineoeor-iooinoc<iooc<ixcooooocDinooN'-i 

CO-"*^ iHtHtH C0»H(N 000 Ttr-I 




Total 
Fail- 
ing 


t> t~ o> in 
■ • -(Nooec 
00 o> 

(M <M t-l 




t-05'-l-^t-CO-^OOe00500>OTj*-^OOOT)<TfiO>'-IC<lM 
OOCDO i-l(NIN iHinrHCOi-l inTjtrH,-!^ 00 CO 
IN 1— 1 iH 




ro. of 


■<i< 


05 rH Tj< OS in 




C^OiOO • -eOlC • IN iH t> t- 'S' rH t- N 0> X CO iH 
0> • • • N r-l 


Boys 


)wing IS 
jects 


ec 


o«T-i weoin 

IM C<I eCH 1-1 IM 




OSlOXX • rH Tj< -rl* tH IN -(MrH ■ O CO IN CO CO CO m X • 
Nin tH -rH -INCO rH 


Grade 


ig Folic 
Sub, 


(M 


o>t>ino>05;D 

CO « « (N 03 IN 




Nineo-^xcoN -TfrH eo rH t> o in eo eo rH os rH • 

CqWIN • N -rH rHCO rH rH • 


Ninth 


Failii 




0> t> 05 «D 00 

00 00 1~ in in in 




t>rHeo -ost-Oi -T-icoint-rHint-inoxcoxcgt- • 

COince • rHrH -i-tC^ rHrH CD O rH iH CO rH • 




Total 
Fail- 
ing 


tHi-tOiONO 

. • ••^t-oo 

t~ t- t- O^O^OJ 




00(NlNt--^OT)<XOlNOOit-rH(NCDeOCDCO-^OSrH 
O rH Tj« rH IN CO rH X rH in rH rH t-I CO IN rH t- CO 
rHrH(N rH (N 


County 


Per Cent in Total 
Counties: 1949 
1950 
1951 

Total Number: 1949 
1950 
1951 




Allegany 1 

Anne Arundel . . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Cecil 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Kent 

Prince George's. . . 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Worcester 



Maryland State Department of Education 



103 



2 * 



O c 



o 3 



o rt c 



it 



O e«.2 



o 

M m 



Or" S 



lO 1-1 CO 
O C<I 'H 



o t- « 



(N (N eg 



t- «o 



■>!j" o 



t'OiOO 



O O 
lOOOO 



-"t t- « 
1-1 oj 00 



t>QO(M 



050.H 

rj< U3 in 

o 



OS o ^ 
S OS o? 



•oocg(Mi-< -oscgco • -eg • -egos -eg. 



•icioojsc -mtoc- • • t> (M . Tj" r-( ec -"J* eg 



•eg«5 • • -cgcgeo 



(N'-i • cgi 



icg • • -i-iw-ieo -cgcg -rpcg -eg 



leg • •;orH 



icgeoegt- -egegfneg 



egu5'<i«irtin --tt-i-ieo -ui • -eg • -eo-^eg 



■ OS -i-iegeo -th 



IsllMllililfJi^iilli 



104 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



00 


Failing Following No. of 
Subjects 




* ■ ■ 

o 


Twelfth Grade Giri 




o o 




do© ^"''^ 






Total 
Fail- 
ing 


t-t «D « 00 eo OS 

CC CC CO ^ »-H 


Eleventh Grade Girls 


Failing Following No. of 
Subjects 




OONiO 0»-liO 

o o o 


« 


©t-00 <£>ma> 
^ o o 


IN 


OS 00 eo ;d ^ cc 

(N ^' (N °° ^ 




■ • • OOiOtJ" 


Total 
Fail- 
ing 


11.9 
8.2 

io!5 

309 
378 
517 


Tenth Grade Girls 


Failing Following No. of 
Subjects 




t- 00 «o «o t> 

^ ^ ^ « CO 

o o o 




00 00 o> 00 

• • • « Tf 

oo© 


N 


05 w in 00 o> t> 

05 00 00 




■ ■ ■ 0500 
lOifllrt (NiMeo 


Total 
Fail- 
ing 


1-iiMr-i ojeoi-i 
• ■ ■ ;c;coo 

05 00 00 Tf 


Ninth Grade Girls 


Failing Following No. of 
Subjects 




OS C- Oi »H t> ifl 
• ■ • ICrf^C 
O©© 


« 


ooost- irt©i-( 

• • • Tjl^lC 

©©© 




iCi irt 05 « t- 

... 00 OS t- 




i->(DC^ t> «D «0 
• • • -rfOSOO 


Total 
Fail- 
ing 


eot-os c<i«oos 
■ • • eoost- 


County 


er Cent in Total 
Counties: 1949 
1950 
1951 

otal Number: 1949 
1950 
1951 



•eooo -^H, 



IN N • OOiO 



W00O>«-li-HN -CQ 



>eco -coNosi-ii-H . -ec' 



i(M . -M (Ni 



iT-l .,-1 • -(MM 



t- >-l O iH r-l 1 



(1) C 
« 



PQUC 



0) m 

0) O C 00 

6 - 



Sot-: 



Maryland State Department of Education 



105 





o. of 




<M in 
d 'd 


•« 


i 

o 

B 


g Following N 
Subjects 








a 

O 




• • in 
o 


• •« 




Failin 




• 

o 


■ -un 


Total 
Fail- 


b« 


o.-Hei3 


eo ec X 




o. of 




oeo m 


» OJ o 


1 

w 

a 


wing N 
ects 


« 


0? eg « 
^ o o 


->t ^ in 


O 
H 


g Folio 
Subj 






inx» 


LEVBNT 


Failin 




o in t> 




W 


Total 
Fail- 


.S 


O IN Tji 

t- m 00 


C^J « S 




0. of 




;D 50 ^ 


in(N-i 


Girls 




« 


t- X t> 

O O rH 


«ot-t> 


Grade 


g Folio 
Subji 




eo «o 


2 N 


Tenth 


Failin 




t- xo> 
«<Deo 


eo lO w 




Total 

Fail 

r ail- 
ing 

i 


5.3 
11.8 
10.1 


in ui -H 

TJ" OS o 




0. of 




X IN in 

O "-t (N 


X-ifX 

iH M 


Girls 


wing N 
ects 


« 


O -1 


a> in in 


Grade 


g Folio- 
Subj. 




■^tiNin 

^ IN CO 


■<i< so o 

i-l (N 


Ninth 


Failin 




Cvl X X 


(NC--^ 

eo in in 




Total 
Fail- 
ing 


6.3 
9 5 
12.1 


CO OJ t- 
;d <-< CO 


County 


Per Cent in Total 
Counties: 1949 
1950 
1951 


Total Number: 1949 
1950 
1951 



'eo^-i • -c^T-i • • -eo • -eo 



loeoi-teo -N^-* • -i-Heo • -eo -x -eo -in 



■com • • • iniN ■ -i-H,-! . 



(NININ-* • -^XIN 



I in -^j" • • N ' 



■ in-*^ . .^t-(N. 



•c<iin-«i"(N -IN?© -eo ■ eo <N c- c^j eo 



•T) 



> 



0) o c to 
M 0) 



O 

•-£<!) 



106 



be 
5 



I 



I 



I 



I 



I 



I 



I 



I 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 

iliillilll 



iiiisiiiii 



Siiiiliisi 



||iS|i.§Sii 



§§gS§§§li§ 



liilllll 



imiis 



iiiiiiiiii 



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S2S; 



iiiiiiiiii 



Maryland State 



Department of Education 



107 






<£ 


N.P 




CO m 05 CO 
,-ico'5i< in 




■(M -COCO • 


t> in • 




i-icoi-io ■ • ■■<i' • 


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CULT 




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1-I005X 

osxmw 




•CO -OiX -INCD^J ■ 


■i-iint-t-fO • CO ■u';ti< 




JO 


N.P. 


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t- N 1-1 (N 


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o o • in in 05 -co ■ 


ATHEMATICS 


o 




;o «o in ;o 


Tl<;OiOO 
(N(M(NeO 




•«CXO5i-i«D«DC0Cg^ 

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t-tiH (Nin i-t r-t i-C(N 


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N.P. 


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in t> t- o 
«o in o> t- 

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t> «o in «j 


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COCOi-li-l i-KN i-l 


CO t> IN (N 1-1 CO in X -INi-l 
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t> ;o in 00 


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N.P. 


■<l<eo iMco 


1-1 CO o 

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t> X o; Oi 


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X 05 O !C 
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in 

05 


INOICOOCDCDC-C^CD^ 


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rH CO 1-" CO 1—1 


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>> 


N.P. 


X t> X 


cgiMOS'-i 

t- CO t- X 


NUMBER BY COUNT 


cD^^^osc^in 


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1-1 i-ilN -1-1 • 


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1-1 -1-1 1-1 






N.P. 


CO CO CO 


CO o CO in 
O X t- o 


(NC<icDinin'*coT)<coiN 

IN 1-1 1-1 


IN 1-1 


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t- I> CO CO 
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INCOCOOCDCDCOiNCDrH 
IN IN 1-1 CO 1-1 


int-inmc^jiNOot-i-i^co 

i-lTf rH (Ni-I 


Engl 


CO 

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N.P. 


05 t- C- 05 


t- in CO "-H 

i-H i-H-l IM 




incDcooi-icgino^o-^ 
eo^^iN 1-1^1-1 


■"ft- 1-1 


OOrHCOO ■ -co • 




Bo: 




t> in !£> 05 


5C rH t> t> 
"<1< ^ eg (N 




■ i-iN-^oinoscocDo 

■INlNr-l,-( 1-1 


t>OT)< 


CO o • m Tj< m 1-1 o in 
i-ieo -iH (N 






N.P. 


^CO^K 


oeocjsx 
X ?o O tH 




• Oi Tj< IN • N CO Csl • 
•COi-l ■ 


1-1 1- CD CO • in CO • • • 




a 




;o in T}< 


OiOOCg 

oc-joco 




•CDIN -1-1 • 
IN • 


CO e<i • 


t-oi-* 


CD X CO ■ CD O iH -1-1 
1-1 C^l -1-1 -1-1 


Cob 


cn 
>» 


o 


t- in ;o 05 


i;o in »H 
<NOint- 

1-1 .-H ,-( (M 




iH in -^t • c- • c<i CD c<i • 

t>CO • ■ "-1 ■ 


ineocooin -conco ■ • • 

.Hi-I iHlO . r-l(N • • • 




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t~ «o in 


«D (M t> CO 

1-1 CO 05 in 




■ CO in -IN ■ 

IN ■ 


<N IN 


corHcooi^Tf -oo • -in 


County 


Per Cent in Total 
Counties: 1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 


Total Number: 1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 




Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 


Dorchester 

Frederick 

Carrott 


Harford 

Kent 


Montgomery 

Prince George's 

St. Mary's 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



108 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



"oo" 

© CO 

« (D 

£ ss 

^ at 
W) .. 

H § 



II 



IS 

OH 

is 

z.s 



oO 3 

III 



2;^ 



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>>•- 



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ir:ic«o;o«o ^i-H(M (M (M N ec (N <-! 



02 1> t> 1-1 oi t> t> ecoi> Tjooxot-NNt- 



oc ec o LO oc o 05 ^im^-c n oc o o oc 

ec in eo «o o oco i-iOt)< «£> t- 1-* eo m <d ^ oj 

O O O tH Tj« CO eO <N 1-1 Oi-Ht- O 00 00 X iC OS (N 

P5 ec(MeoeOT}< ^ jg^^jg^ 



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S* -4- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



109 



TABLE 64 



Supervisory* and Pupil Personnel Services Provided by the Counties and Baltimore 
City in Maryland Public Schools: Number of Principals and Teachers: Year Ending 

June 30, 1951 



County 


Principals 

and 
Teachers 


Total 
Super- 
visors 


General Sx 

Eleme 
White 


ipervisors by 
School 

Titary 

Colored 


Type of 
High 


Other 
Super- 
visorst 


Pupil 
Personne 




12,405 


2 


196 


3 


56 


2 


17 


2 


48 


8 


74 1 


88 9 


Baltimore City 


4,231 




61 


9 


8 





4 





13 





36 .9 


43 .0 


Total Counties 


8,174 


1 


134 


4 


48 


2 


13 


2 


35 


8 


37.2 


45.9 


Allegany. 


555 





8 





3 





t 




1 


5 


3.5 


3.0 


Anne Arundel 


646 


7 


8 





3 





1 





2 





2.0 


4.0 


Baltimore 


1,293 


9 


21 


5 


5 


7 


1 





5 


8 


9.0 


6.0 


Calvert 


95 


7 


2 





1 





1 











1.0 


Caroline. 


137 


1 

9 


2 


4 


1 








4 


1 







0.9 


Carroll 


291 


4 


5 


2 


.0 





3 


1 





1.2 


2.0 


Cecil 


220 


.1 


3 


4 


2 





X 




1 





0.4 


1.0 


Charles 


182 


7 


3 


.0 


1 


.0 





6 


1 


4 




1.0 


Dorchester 


187 


5 


3 


.0 


1 


.0 


1 





1 







1.0 


Frederick . 


351 


5 


.1 


1 


.5 





5 


1 


5 


1.6 


1.0 


Garrett 


180 


7 


3 


.0 


2 


.0 






1 







1.0 


Harford 


317 


6 


3 


.5 


2 


.0 


t 




1 


5 




2.0 


Howard 


164 


9 


3 


.0 


1 


.0 





6 


1 


4 




1.0 


Kent..... 


103 


3 


2 


.5 


1 


.0 





5 


1 







1.0 


Montgomery 


1,005 


3 


18 


.0 


7 


.0 


1 





4 





6.0 


4.5 


Prince George's 


1,063 


8 


16 


.8 


4 


.0 


1 





2 





9.8 


6.0 


Queen Anne's 


115 


7 


2 


.5 


1 


.0 





5 


1 


.0 




0.5 


St. Mary's 


115 


8 


2 


.8 


1 


.0 





8 


1 







1.0 


Somerset . 


137 


8 


2 


7 




.0 





5 


1 


2 




1.0 


Talbot .. 


131 





2 


.5 


1 


.0 





5 


1 







1.0 


Washington 


516 


9 


9 


2 


3 


.0 


t 




2 


5 


3.7 


3.0 


Wicomico 


205 


1 


4 





2 


.0 


1 





1 







2.0 


Worcester 


154 


5 


3 





1 


.0 


1 





1 







1.0 







* Excludes supervisors of Maintenance, Transportation, and Buildings. 

t Includes supervisors of Art, Audio-Visual Education, Commercial Curriculum, Distributive Educa- 
tion, English, Geography, Guidance, Handwriting, Health, History, Home Economics, Industrial Educa- 
tion, Instruction, Languages, Libraries, Mathematics, Music, Safety, Science, Special Education, and 
Vocational Education. 

X Less than . 1 of one supervisor's time. 



110 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 65 — Number of Clerks Employed in Schools and Salaries Paid : Maryland 
County Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



County 


Number 


Salaries 


County 


Number 


Salaries 




of Clerks 


Paid 




of Clerks 


Paid 



269 


6 


$353,125.18 


Harford 






Howard 


9 





14,677.50 


Kent 


31 





39,319.23 


Montgomery 


49 


5 


77,083.66 


Prince George's 


3 





3,180.00 




2 


4 


1,682.80 


St. Mary's 


8 





6.375.00 


Somerset 


7 





4,930.70 


Talbot 


2 





2,680.70 







4 


' 585.00 


Wicomico 


12 





13,220.00 


Worcester 


2 





1,735.00 





Total Counties . 

Allegany .... 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore. . . 

Calvert 

Caroline .... 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . 
Frederick. . . . 
Garrett 



11 





8,569.71 


6 





3,465.00 





5 


547.00 


37 


2 


83,592.75 


56 





51,208.91 


2 


6 


4,052.50 





6 


566.67 


14 





20,022.78 


10 


5 


12,618.72 


5 


5 


3,011.55 



TABLE 66 — Repair or Utility Men; Janitors, Cleaners, Firemen, etc.: Maryland 
Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1951 





Repair 


OR Utility Men 




Janitors 


Cleaners, Firemen, etc. 




County 




Full- 


Part- 


White 


Colored 




Total 


Time 


Time 


Total 


FuU- 
Time 


Part- 
Time 


Total 


Full- 
Time 


Part- 
Time 


Total State 


549 


382 


167 


1,351 


866 


485 


635 


302 


333 


Baltimore City . . 


194 


194 




383 


192 


191 


441 


221 


220 


Total Counties . . 


355 


188 


167 


968 


674 


294 


194 


81 


113 


Allegany 


2 


2 




79 


68 


11 


2 


1 


1 


Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 


21 
8 
2 


17 
6 
2 


' '4 

2 


77 
169 
7 


68 
98 
3 


9 
71 
4 


33 
22 
3 


13 
11 
3 


20 
11 




4 


2 


' '2 


13 


6 


7 


5 


1 


"4 


Carroll 


1 






19 


16 


3 


2 


1 


1 


Cecil 


3 


3 




27 


12 


15 


4 


2 


2 


Charles 








7 


7 




3 


3 




Dorchester. . . . 


■ 3 


■ 3 




20 
44 


18 
26 


' '2 
18 


4 

8 


4 
1 


' 7 


Garrett 


' '2 


' '2 




42 


14 


28 








Harford 


5 


4 


" "i 


40 


26 
9 


14 


' 6 


■ "3 


' 3 


Howard 


2 


2 




14 


5 


10 


2 


8 


Kent 


2 


1 


"i 


12 


7 


5 


7 


2 


5 


Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Talbot 


150 
82 
1 

' *3 


50 
78 
1 


100 
4 

■ 3 


131 
123 
13 
4 
10 
19 


123 

85 
7 
4 
7 

15 


8 
38 
6 

' "3 
4 


16 
42 
1 
2 
4 
6 


7 
13 
1 
2 
4 
2 


9 
29 

' '4 


Washington . . . 


62 


12 


50 


67 
18 


' 37 
12 


30 
6 


2 
3 


2 
2 


' i 




" '2 


' '2 




13 


6 


7 


9 


1 


8 



Maryland State Department of Education 



111 



TABLE 67— Parent-Teacher Associations: Maryland County Schools: 1950-1951 



County 


Parent-Teacher Associations in Maryland County Schools 


White Schools 


Colored Schools 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1950 


1951 


1950 


1951 


1950 


1951 


1950 


1951 


Total Counties 


505 


507 


89 


1 


88 


8 


241 


212 


96 





93.0 


Allegany 


34 


34 


89 


5 


89 


5 


1 


1 


50 





50.0 




37 


3T 


100 





100 





28 


24 


100 





100.0 




49 


51 


94 


2 


94 


4 


15 


14 


100 





100.0 


Calvert 


6 


6 


100 





100 





13 


14 


92 


9 


100.0 


Caroline 


8 


9 


88 


9 


100 





3 


3 


75 





75.0 


Carroll 


17 


17 


94 


4 


89 


5 


3 


2 


100 





100.0 


Cecil 


17 


17 


77 


3 


77 


3 


3 


3 


100 





100.0 


Charles 


8 


8 


100 





100 





22 


20 


100 





95.2 


Dorchester 


27 


14 


100 





51 


9 


12 


4 


100 





33.3 


Frederick 


21 


24 


70 





80 





7 


7 


87 


5 


87.5 




29 


26 


64 


4 


61 


9 












Harford 


23 


22 


79 


3 


95 


7 


"8 


3 


80 


6 


100 ! 6 


Howard 


9 


9 


90 





90 





9 


9 


100 





90.0 


Kent 


12 


11 


100 





100 





6 


6 


100 





100.0 


Montgomery 


45 


53 


100 





100 





15 


13 


100 





100.0 


Prince George's 


53 


56 


96 


4 


96 


6 


37 


31 


100 





100.0 


Queen Anne's 


14 


13 


87 


5 


81 


3 


13 


12 


100 





92.3 


St. Mary's 


11 


11 


68 


8 


68 


8 


8 


8 


72 


7 


80.0 


Somerset 


12 


12 


100 





100 





9 


10 


100 





100.0 


Talbot 


11 


11 


100 





100 





8 


9 


88 


9 


100.0 


"Washington 


39 


40 


90 


7 


93 





1 


1 


100 





100.0 




13 


16 


81 


3 


100 





11 


9 


100 





100.0 


Worcester 


10 


10 


100 





100 





9 


9 


100 





100.0 



112 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 68 

Number and Per Cent of Men Teachers in Maryland Counties: 1942-1951 



Year 
Ending June 30 



White 



Elementary- 



Number 



Per Cent 



High 



Number 



Per Cent 



Colored 



Elementary 



Number 



Per Cent 



High 



Number 



Per Cent 



1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 



190 
139 
108 
104 
107 
125 
161 
175 
243 
295 



7.1 
5.2 
4.0 
3.7 
3.9 
4.5 
5.4 
5.5 
7.1 
8.0 



670 
538 
488 
465 
629 
787 
931 
1,025 
1,203 
1,454 



36.2 
29.7 
27.3 
25.8 
29.-4 
33.8 
36.7 
38.3 
41.1 
44.0 



10.9 
9.7 
7.5 
7.1 
7.5 
8.6 
10.1 
10.5 
10.6 
11.0 



89 
81 
72 
78 
88 
103 
126 
140 
154 
205 



46.4 
42.0 
34.8 
36.8 
33.7 
34.4 
37.2 
37.3 
36.6 
40.0 



See TABLE X. 



TABLE 69 

Maryland College Graduates of 1950 Who Qualified to Teach in Maryland Public 
Schools: By College and Number Who Taught in Maryland Public Schools 

in 1950-51* 





Maryland College Graduates of 1950 Quali- 




fied TO Teach in Maryland Public Schools 


College or University 








Total 


Taught in Maryland 






Public Schools in 1950-51 


Total - - - - 


941 


516 


Goucher College - -.- 


12 




Hood College ..- 


19 


6 


Loyola College -— 


9 


8 


Maryland Institute — - -- — 


4 


4 


Maryland State College — Princess Anne 


18 


3 


AlcCoy College — Johns Hopkins University 


14 


10 




128 


28 


Mount St. Mary's College 


2 


2 


Notre Dame College. 


20 


10 
8 




12 


St. Joseph's College - - 


16 


4 


Washington College... 


31 


15 


Western Maryland College 


66 
308 


51 


University of Maryland.. 


104 


State Teachers Colleges: 


29 


27 






32 


32 




53 


43 


Salisbury 


42 


39 


Towson 


126 


122 



* Based on reports from colleges. Vocational placement not available for all graduates. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



113 



TABLE 70 — Number of Students in Maryland Colleges Who Prepared to Qualify for Standard 
Teaching Certiftcates in Maryland: 1948 — 1951* 



- 

Type of Cesitificate 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


^^Thite 




White 




Wliite 




Wliite 




Grand Total 


349 


168 


485 


159 


737 


208 


777 


211 


Nursery School and 


















Kindergarten 










50 




75 




El^MENTARY 


















120 Semester hours 


92 


58 


94 


45 


126 


62 


156 


109 


Junior High (Core) 






21 




101 




98 




High School 


















Total High School 


256 


110 


370 


114 


460 


146 


448 


102 


Agriculture 


10 


4 


9 


1 


20 


4 


30 


5 


Art 


7 




15 




12 




20 


3 


Commerce 


2 




5 




9 




7 


2 




41 


is 


62 


'26 


67 


'i7 


51 


18 


Foreign Language (any) 


22 


9 


33 


8 


13 


3 


16 


7 


Home Economics 


23 


15 


9 


10 


24 


15 


33 


7 


Industrial Arts 


9 


2 


16 


13 


28 


6 


32 


3 


Library Science 






1 












Mathematics 


12 


' 8 


26 


' 8 


38 


' '7 


23 


' '4 


Music 


9 


7 


14 


7 


17 


12 


28 


3 


Physical Education: 




















20 


16 


39 


13 


79 


27 


66 


11 




15 


12 


23 


5 


21 


13 


24 


10 


Science: 


















All Sciences 














15 




General Science .... 


19 


io 


■ 8 


' 6 


27 


' 6 


5 


" '7 


Biology 


9 




15 


3 


10 


10 


7 


1 


Chemistry 


1 




6 


1 


8 




2 






1 




5 




3 




1 






55 


14 


84 


19 


83 


26 


85 


2i. 


Speech 


1 








1 




3 





* Calendar year. 

Note: Each student is counted only once (in his first major). 



114 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 71 — County Teachers in Service October, 1950, Who Attended Summer 
Schools and Evening Classes: Spring and Summer 1950 



County 


Teachers in Service Oct. 1950 Who 
Attended in 1950 


School Attended 


Number of 
Teachers 


Total 
Num- 
ber 


Number 


Per Cent 


Elem. 


High 


Elem. 


High 


Elem. 


High 



WHITE COUNTY TEACHERS 



Total White . . . 


1,559 


770 


789 


21 





23 


7 


Allegany 


58 


20 


38 


7 


6 


13 


5 


Anne Arundel . . 


111 


45 


66 


17 





26 


9 




276 


170 


106 


26 


2 


20 


1 


Calvert 


18 


7 


11 


26 


9 


45 


8 




34 


26 


8 


57 


8 


13 


1 


Carroll 


41 


16 


25 


12 


4 


16 


9 


Cecil 


41 


10 


31 


11 





28 


2 


Charles 


25 


7 


18 


14 


3 


31 





Dorchester .... 


30 


12 


18 


18 


2 


26 


1 


Frederick 


76 


25 


51 


16 


7 


29 


7 




58 


27 


31 


26 


5 


39 


2 




70 


33 


37 


22 


6 


28 


7 


Howard 


47 


22 


25 


36 


1 


36 


8 


Kent 


14 


6 


8 


17 


1 


20 





Montgomery. . . 


254 


147 


107 


27 


3 


28 


1 


Prince George's 


198 


101 


97 


20 


7 


24 


2 


Queen Anne's . . 


11 


4 


7 


10 


5 


15 


9 


St. Mary's 


11 


1 


10 


2 


3 


29 


4 


Somerset 


15 


9 


6 


21 


4 


12 


8 


Talbot 


22 


8 


14 


19 


5 


29 


2 


Washington . . . 


106 


48 


58 


19 


1 


23 


1 




23 


16 


7 


17 





11 


9 


Worcester 


20 


10 


10 


21 


3 


17 


9 



Total 

University of Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University 

Towson State Teachers College . . 

Columbia University 

George Washington University . . 

West Virginia University 

Western Maryland College 

Pennsylvania State College 

Shepherd State Teachers College . 

University of Delaware 

Temple University 

Fairmont Teachers College 

New York University 

Catholic University 

University of Pittsburgh 

California, Pa. State Teachers Col. 

University of Pennsylvania 

Radford College 

Duke University 

University of Virginia 

American University 

One Hundred Twenty-Two Others 



770 


789 


282 


339 


77 


41 


90 


1 


36 


51 


38 


28 


18 


36 


17 


34 


12 


30 


29 


10 


19 


18 




21 


i4 


2 


4 


12 


4 


11 


6 

8 


8 
3 


2 


7 


6 


2 


2 


6 


2 


6 


1 


7 


103 


116 



COLORED COUNTY TEACHERS 



Total Colored . , 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



380 


39 
38 
9 
4 
3 
7 
22 
20 
10 

i9 
17 
10 
24 
55 

7 
11 
22 
16 

6 
15 
26 



217 


27 
19 
5 
3 
1 
4 
15 
14 



14 



163 


12 
19 
4 
1 
2 



32.8 

0.0 
33.3 
27.1 
17.2 
20.0 
12.5 
44.4 
32.6 
45.2 
35.3 



47.4 
40.0 
31.8 
27.2 
11.8 
34.8 
48.1 
39.1 
80.0 
30.0 
53.8 



31.7 

0.0 
21.1 
38.8 
23.5 

6.3 
25.0 
27.3 
25.0 
30.0 
30.8 

50.6 
47.1 
28.6 
26.3 
39.1 
31.3 
20.0 
40.9 
36.8 
25.0 
27.3 
48.0 



Total 

Morgan State College .... 

New York University 

Temple University 

Columbia University 

Hampton Institute 

Catholic University 

Howard University 

University of Pennsylvania 
Virginia State College. . . . 
Pennsylvania State College 
University of Delaware . . . 

Boston University 

University of Maryland* . . 

Stover College 

University of Pittsburgh . . 
Bluefield Teachers College 

American University 

Loyola College 

Cornell University 

Seventeen Others 



217 


163 


95 


10 


19 


31 


14 


20 


11 


19 


20 


7 


10 


10 


8 


10 


4 


13 


2 


7 


3 


5 


5 


1 


3 


3 


4 


1 


3 


1 


3 


1 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


'8 


3 
16 



* The University of Maryland offered extension courses on the campus of Bowie State Teachers College. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



115 



TABLE 72 — Number of Certificates Issued to Maryland Teachers, Principals, 
Administrative and Supervisory Personnel in the County Schools by the 
Maryland State Department of Education: 1948-49, 1949-50, 1950-51 



Grade of Certificate 



NiiMBER OF Certificates Issited 



1948-49 



1949-50 



Total Number of Certificates Issued 

Administration and Supervision 

Administration and Supervision 

High School Supervision." 

Elementary Supervision 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel I 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel II 

Supervision of Special Subjects 

Supervisor or Director in Special Areas 

Visiting Teacher 

Coimty Librarian 

High School 

Principal 

Academic 

Special 

Vocational 

Junior High School 

Nonpublic 

Elementary 

Principal 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education . 

Bachelor of Science in Special Subjects 

Bachelor of Science for Kindergarten Teaching 

Advanced First Grade 

Nonpublic Bachelor of Science 

War Emergency Certificates 
Degree 

High School Teaching 

Elementary School Teaching 

Non-Degree 

High School Teaching 

Elementary School Teaching 

Provisional Certificates 

Substitute Teachers' Certificates 

Degree 

Non-Degree 



1,695 



20 
257 
196 
36 
22 
85 



19 
363 
6 



37 



167 
174 



18 
161 



18 



2,094 



12 



20 
352 
268 
46 
69 
64 



24 
307 
5 



189 
360 



12 
193 



39 



116 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 123 
TABLE 80 



Number and Per Cent of New Teachers: Maryland County Schools: 1942-1951 





New to Counties 






Number 


New to County Who Were 










Change 
in 

Number 






Experienced 


Year 


Number 


Per Cent 


of 
Teach- 
ing Posi- 
tions 
October 

to 
October 


In- 
experi- 
enced 


Sub- 
stitutes 


But 
New 

to 
State 


In 
Counties 
But Not 
Teaching 
Preced- 
ing Year 


From 
An- 
other 
County* 


From 
Other 
Type 
School 
in Same 
County* 


Othert 



WHITE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1941-42 . . 


355 


13.4 


-38 


142 


67 


63 


83 


31 


4 




1942-43 . . 


565 


21.3 


+8 


272 




169 


124 


54 


5 




1943-44 . . 


521 


19.4 


+42 


165 


io 


215 


131 


49 


5 


47 


1944-45 . . 


553 


20.1 


+67 


176 


88 


190 


99 


46 


10 


29 


1945-46 . . 


621 


22.7 


-52 


159 


85 


219 


157 


°50 


12 


47 


1946-47 . . 


712 


25.3 


+79 


145 


106 


279 


181 


°57 


15 


41 


1947-48 . . 


586 


19.6 


+ 181 


127 


57 


244 


154 


x59 


20 


32 


1948-49 . . 


646 


20.5 


+ 148 


151 


26 


309 


157 


Xb9 


26 


21 


1949-50 . . 


692 


20.3 


+264 


264 


21 


267 


136 


x43 


26 


33 


1950-51 . . 


831 


22.7 


+250 


350 


15 


303 


157 


z58 


9 


36 



WHITE HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1941-42 . . 


421 


22.6 


+73 


233 


26 


111 


51 


25 


30 




1942-43 . . 


587 


32.9 


-19 


270 




237 


80 


61 


21 




1943-44 . . 


517 


28.7 


-55 


196 


6 


241 


74 


58 


27 


10 


1944-45 . . 


525 


29.0 


+ 16 


178 


71 


210 


66 


46 


24 


15 


1945-46 . . 


779 


37.0 


+286 


240 


51 


302 


186 


50 


116 


22 


1946-47 . . 


763 


33.4 


+ 193 


298 


53 


278 


131 


157 


53 


28 


1947-48 . . 


675 


26.7 


+239 


259 


22 


280 


112 


1/38 


43 


15 


1948-49 . . 


605 


22.4 


+ 168 


281 


25 


239 


58 


J/57 


22 


14 


1949-50 . . 


722 


24.6 


+242 


431 


7 


207 


76 


°52 


42 


10 


1950-51 . . 


912 


27.4 


+394 


603 


17 


223 


68 


°53 


19 


13 



COLORED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1941-42 . . 


59 


9.8 


-24 


37 


8 


5 


9 


5 


1 




1942-43 . . 


87 


14.7 


-9 


65 




9 


13 


9 






1943-44 . . 


120 


20.3 


-6 


81 


6 


18 


15 


9 




6 


1944-45 . . 


132 


22.3 


+ 14 


84 


17 


16 


15 


21 




3 


1945-46 . . 


108 


18.2 


-10 


48 


13 


20 


27 


18 


i 


4 


1946-47 . . 


104 


17.0 


+ 18 


45 


8 


19 


32 


6 


5 


1 


1947-48 . . 


71 


11.7 


-5 


50 


3 


8 


10 


6 


3 


6 


1948-49 . . 


97 


15.1 


+35 


53 


4 


12 


27 


°9 


3 


3 


1949-50 . . 


71 


10.9 


+ 11 


38 




11 


22 


4 


3 


7 


1950-51 . . 


76 


11.5 


+8 


39 


5 


14 


18 


6 


2 


2 



COLORED HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1941-42 . . 


38 


19 


9 


+ 11 


27 




7 


4 


3 


4 




1942-43 . . 


65 


32 


8 


+ 5 


49 




10 


6 


11 


2 




1943-44 . . 


79 


37 


4 


+ 15 


52 


5 


19 


3 


4 


1 


"i 


1944-45 . . 


90 


43 


1 


+7 


49 


9 


28 


4 


11 






1945-46 . . 


96 


37 





+43 


59 


7 


15 


14 


°12 


ii 




1946-47 . . 


104 


35 


3 


+35 


64 




23 


16 


3 


10 


"i 


1947-48 . . 


110 


32 


3 


+46 


65 


2 


29 


14 


4 


10 




1948-49 . . 


98 


26 





+36 


56 


2 


26 


14 


5 


4 


i 


1940-50 . . 


102 


24 


2 


+ 44 


68 


1 


24 


9 


6 


5 


1 


1950-51 . . 


153 


29 


8 


+93 


93 




42 


18 


10 


10 





* Excluded from total number and per cent new to counties. 

t Withdrawals during year who returned during the same year excluded from total number and per 
cent. 

° One transfer from Baltimore City is included in the total number and per cent, 
t Three transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent. 
X Four transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent. 
y Two transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent. 
z Six transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent 



124 Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 81 



Number and Per Cent of White Elementary 
Individual County of Maryland 



School Teachers New to the Schools of Each 
During the School Year 1950-51 



County 


New to County 


Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 

October 
to 

October 




Number New 


TO County Who 


Were 




Number 


Per Cent 


In- 
experi- 
enced 


Sub- 
stitutes 


But New to 
State* 


In Counties 
But Not 
Teaching Pre- 
ceding Year 


From Another 3 
Countyt g" 


From Other 
Type School 
in Same 
Countyt 


Withdrawals 
During Year 
Who Returned 
During Yearf 


Total State 


074 


4-^11 .4 


+302 


519 




348 


192 


76 


9 


36 


Baltimore City 






















Elementary and 






















Occupational. . 


267 


16.7 


+52 


169 




45 


35 


18 






Total Coimties .... 


t831 


t22.7 


+250 


350 


15 


303 


157 


58 


9 


36 


Allegany 


25 


9.5 


-6 


17 




1 


6 


1 


1 


5 


Anne Arundel . . . 


75 


28.4 


+19 


27 




23 


15 






3 




174 


26.9 


+52 


82 


i 


41 


41 


ooog 


i 


9 


Calvert 


6 


23.1 





3 




1 


2 








Caroline 


11 


24.4 


+2 


6 






3 


'2 






Carroll 


25 


19.4 


+9 


15 


2 


4 


4 




i 




CecU 


11 


12.1 


+3 


5 




4 


1 


i 


1 


i 


Chartes 


17 


34.7 


+4 


6 


i 


3 


6 


1 


1 




Dorchester 


6 


9.1 


+1 


1 


1 


1 


3 




1 




Frederick 


18 


12.0 


+5 


12 




4 


1 


i 


2 


i 


Garrett 


16 


15.7 


-5 


7 


i 


6 


2 






2 


Harford 


42 


28.8 


+12 


30 


1 


7 


4 






2 


Howard 


12 


19.7 


+3 


4 




4 


3 


i 




1 


Kent 


3 


8.6 





1 






2 






1 


Montgomery .... 


184 


34.2 


+82 


59 


4 


93 


16 


°i2 




6 


I*rince George's . 


167 


34.2 


+60 


44 


4 


83 


22 






3 


Queen Anne's . . . 


6 


15.8 


+1 


2 




2 


2 








St. Mar>''3 


21 


47.7 


+3 


6 




9 


6 










5 


11.9 


+2 


2 




1 


1 


i 






Talbot 


8 


19.5 


+1 






4 


4 








Washington 


26 


10.3 


-4 


9 




9 


7 


i 




i 


Wicomico 


16 


17.0 


+6 


7 




3 


4 


2 




1 


Worcester 


9 


19.1 





5 






2 


2 







* Includes transfers from private schools. 

t Excluded from all totals in column one and two. 

X Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group, but trans- 
fers from Baltimore City to a county and vice versa are included in totals and percentages. All transfers are excluded 
from total and percentage for total State. 

° One transfer from Baltimore City. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



125 



TABLE 82 

Number and Per Cent of White Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior High School Teachers Nei 
to the Schools of Each Individual County of Maryland During the School Year 1950-51 





New to County 






NUMBEB New 


TO County Who 












Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 
October 

to 
October 






Experienced 


County 


Number 


Per Cent 


In- 
experi- 
enced 


Sub- 
stitutes 


o 

h 

5 

CQ 




<^ 

s 1 


— ~ JJ-*- 
s 

^ 5 S = 

mi 

a. 


n a f a 

i>l> 

a sac; 5* 

liil 



Total State 


tl.OOl 


:2i.7 


+426 


661 


17 


239 


84 


62 


Baltimore City- 


















Junior High 


70 


11.5 


+21 


43 




10 


10 


7 


Senior High 


23 


4 3 


+9 


10 




c 


5 


2 


Vocational 


6 


5.0 


+2 


5 






1 




Total Counties. . . . 


:9i2 


:27.4 


+394 


603 


17 


223 


68 


53 


Allegany 


41 


14 6 


+15 


2« 


2 


7 


5 


1 


Anne Arundel . . . 


67 


27.3 


+33 


38 




20 


5 


4 


Baltimore 


188 


35.6 


+ 100 


146 


"2 


22 




"11 


Calvert 


1 


4.2 









1 






Caroline 


24 


39.3 


+9 


17 




3 




i 


Carroll 


60 


40.5 


+23 


33 




10 




s 


Cecil 


31 


28.2 


+ 16 


23 




s 




1 


Charles 


18 


31.0 


+9 


5 




9 




1 


Dorchester 


20 


29.0 


+8 


13 




4 




1 


Frederick 


34 


19.8 


+ 13 


24 




5 




4 


Garrett 


26 


32.9 


+11 


19 




7 






Harford 


39 


30.2 


+ 12 


23 




9 




'2 


Howard 


33 


48.5 


+ 10 


18 




11 




3 


Kent 


10 


25.0 


+7 


6 










Montgomery .... 


109 


28.6 


+42 


44 




47 


8 


6 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . . 


128 


31.9 


+40 


74 




39 


10 


5 


15 


34.1 


+9 


13 




1 




1 


St. Mary's 


18 


.52.9 


+4 


15 




1 




1 




13 


27.7 


+4 


8 




1 


3 




Talbot 


12 


25.0 


+6 


6 




4 


1 


i 


Washington 


48 


19.1 


+ 14 


30 




13 


3 


2 


Wicomico 


16 


27.1 


+4 


12 




2 




2 


Worcester 


13 


23.2 


+5 


10 




1 


"2 





19 



la 



13 



* Includes transfers from private schools. 

t Excluded from all totals tn columns one and two. 

t Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for countiai as 
fers from Baltimore City and vice versa are included in totals and percentages. AH transfers are 
and percentage for total State. 

° One transfer from Baltimore City. 



126 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 83 

Number and Per Cent of Colored Elementary School Teachers New to the Schools of Each 
Individual County of Maryland During the School Year 1950-51 



County 



New to County 



Number 



Per Cent 



Number New to County Who Were 



Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 

October 
to 

October 



In- 
experi- 
enced 



Sub- 
stitutes 



Experienced 



1^ 



In Counties 
But Not 
Teaching Pre- 
cedine Year 


From Another 
Countyt 


34 


12 


16 


6 


18 


6 


i 


i 




1 


i 




5 




1 




"i 




5 




"i 




3 


i 



e S « 



'V 

l< g 
w ctf u ^ 

0) - fl> 



Total State 

Baltimore City 
Elementary and 
Occupational 

Total Counties . . 

Allegany 

Anne Axundel. 
Baltimore .... 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . 
St. Mary's .... 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester .... 



tl41 



71 
:76 



tS.8 



$11.5 

20.0 
9.9 
11.4 
13.8 
0.0 
0.0 
22.2 
28.3 
6.5 
0.0 

5.5 
15.8 
13.3 
13.6 
12.6 

5.9 
13.0 
25.9 

8.7 
20.0 

3.3 
15.4 



+27 



+ 19 

+8 


-1 
+ 1 
+ 1 




+1 
+1 



-2 
+ 1 
+ 1 
+2 
+ 1 


+2 
+2 
-1 


-1 





22 



t Excluded from all totals in columns one and two. 

X Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



127 



TABLE 84 



Number and Per Cent of Colored Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior High School Teachers New 
to the Schools of Each Individual County of Maryland During the School Year 1950-51 



I 



County 


New to County 


Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 

October 
to 

October 


Number New to County Who Were 


XT U 

M um Der 


irer v./enL 


In- 
expen- 
n a 


* 

Sub- 


But New to 
State 


In Counties 
But Not 
Teaching Pre- 
ceding Year M 


perienced 

r* 

Bo 


From Other 
Type of 
School in 
Same Countyf 


Withdrawals 
During Year 
Who Re- 
turned Dur- 
ing Yeart 1 




tl95 


%20 .7 


+1 1 1; 


119 




50 


26 


14 


10 




Baltimore (_/ity .... 
























37 


15 .6 


2 


22 




5 


8 


2 








8 


6 .4 




4 




2 




2 








1 


1.5 



— <s 






1 










1 otal bounties .... 


tl53 


t29.8 


1 no 


93 




42 


18 


10 


10 




Allegany 





0.0 



















Anne Arundel . . . 


20 


35.1 


+19 


■9 




6 


'3 


"2 


'4 




Baltimore 


14 


28.6 


+ 11 


5 




2 


3 


4 


2 




Calvert 


4 


23.5 


+2 


2 




1 


1 










8 


50.0 


+3 


5 




2 


1 








Carroll 


2 


25.0 


+ 1 


2 














Cecil 


2 


18.2 


+ 1 


2 














Charles 


9 


32.1 


+4 


7 




'2 










Dorchester 


8 


40.0 


+3 


4 




3 


i 








Frederick 


3 


23.1 





3 














Garrett 
























ii 


45.8 


+7 


'4 




6 


i 










12 


70.6 


+3 


6 




3 


2 








Kent 


3 


21.4 


+3 


2 




1 










Montgomery .... 


11 


28.9 


+10 


7 




3 


i 




i 




Prince George's. . 


26 


37.7 


+9 


14 




10 


1 


i 


2 




Queen Anne's . . . 


5 


31.3 


+5 


2 






2 


1 






St. Mary's 


3 


20.0 


+2 


3 














Somerset 


7 


31.8 


+ 1 


6 








i 






Talbot 


2 


10.5 


+3 


1 




"i 






i 




Washington 


2 


25.0 





1 




1 










Wicomico 


5 


22.7 


+3 


4 




1 










Worcester 


6 


24.0 


+3 


4 






'2 









t Excluded from all totals in columns one and two. 

X Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group. 



r 



128 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 85 



Source of New Teachers: Counties of Maryland: 1950-1951 



County 


Total 


Experienced 


Inexperienced 


Total* 


Recruited from 


Recruited from 


Recruited from 


Mary- 
land 


Other 
States 


Mary- 
land 


Other 
States 


Mary- 
land 


Other 
States 


WHITE TEACHERS 


Total Counties 


1,808 


1,144 


664 


635 


281 


509 


- 383 


Allegany 


71 


48 


23 


23 


6 


25 


17 


Anne Arundel 


147 


103 


44 


63 


21 


40 


23 




367 


272 


95 


127 


1 8 






Calvert 


7 


5 


2 


3 


1 


2 




Caroline 


35 


21 


14 


8 


4 


13 


10 


Carroll ... 


85 


65 


20 


31 


7 


34 


13 


Cecil 


43 


22 


21 


10 


5 


12 


16 




34 


20 


14 


15 


9 


5 


5 




28 


16 


12 


12 


2 


4 


10 




51 


35 


16 


14 


4 


21 


12 




43 


13 


30 


9 


10 


4 


20 




77 


49 


28 


22 


9 


27 


19 




41 


24 


17 


17 


g 


7 


j^l 




14 


10 


4 


7 




3 


4 




275 


168 


107 


114 


69 


54 


38 




278 


132 


146 


91 


84 


41 


62 


20 


15 


5 


4 


1 


11 


4 




34 


20 


14 


12 


3 


g 


11 




13 


10 


3 


5 




5 


3 




18 


10 


8 


8 


4 


2 


4 




73 


48 


25 


22 


13 


26 


12 




32 


22 


10 


12 


4 


10 


g 




22 


16 


6 


6 


\ 


10 


5 




COLORED 


TEACHERS 








Total Counties 


241 


148 


93 


80 


39 


68 


54 


Allegany 


1 





1 





1 


0. 





Anne Arundel 


31 


22 


9 


12 


5 


10 


4 


Baltimore 


20 


17 


3 


11 


2 


6 


1 


Calvert 


7 


6 


1 


2 


1 


4 





Caroline 


8 


4 


4 


3 


1 


1 


3 


Carroll 


1 


1 











1 





Cecil 


4 


3 


1 


1 





2 


1 


Charles 


17 


12 


5 


5 


2 


7 


3 


Dorchester 


10 


5 


5 


2 


4 


3 


1 


Frederick 


3 


2 


1 








2 


1 


Garrett 
















Harford 


11 


7 


4 


3 


■ 4 


4 





Howard 


14 


8 


6 


4 


2 


4 


4 


Kent 


5 


4 


1 


1 


1 


3 





Montgomery 


18 


7 


11 


5 


3 


2 


8 


Prince George's 


43 


17 


26 


12 


13 


5 


13 


Queen Anne's 


7 


4 


3 


4 








3 


St. Mary's 


6 


5 


1 








5 


1 


Somerset 


12 


8 


4 


3 





5 


4 


Talbot 


4 


3 


1 


3 








1 


Washington 


3 


2 


1 









1 


Wicomico 


6 


3 


3 


2 





1 


3 


Worcester 


10 


8 


2 


6 





2 


2 



* Excludes a total of 134 teachers (116 white, 18 colored) for whom no information is available. In- 
cludes a total of 218 teachers (188 white, 30 colored) who transferred between counties, or city and coun- 
ties. 

Note: The "permanent home address," as listed on the teacher's application blank has been used as 
the factor determining the "source" of teachers. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



129 



TABLE 86 — Average Number Belonging per Maryland Teacher and Principal: 
State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal 



County 


White 






White Elementary 


Schools'^ 






Colored 


Schools 




High 






























Schools 


All Ele- 


One- 


Two- 


Three- 










Ele- 








mentary 


teacher 


teacher 


teacher 


Graded 


High 


mentary* 


State Average 


21 


7 


33 















33 


3 


22 


8 


33 


2 


Baltimore City 


21 


4 


31 


3 












31 


3 


24 


6 


32 


2 


County Average 


21 


9 


^ 33 


7 


22 


8 


26 


6 


30.1 


34 


3 


21 


2 


34 


7 


Allegany 


23 


6 


31 


5 






24 


9 


27.4 


31 


9 


16 


4 


31 


4 


Anne Arundel 


20 


9 


35 


8 






22 


2 


33.6 


36 





24 


3 


35 


2 




25 


3 


35 


2 






t31 


7 




35 


3 


23 


5 


36 


9 


Calvert 


20 


1 


31 


7 






tl4 


5 


t33 . 4 


33 


1 


22 


4 


35 


3 


Caroline 


18 


1 


35 









30 


4 


35 


6 


19 


8 


36 


7 


Carroll 


19 


5 


32 


8 






21 


6 




33 




17 


1 


34 





Cecil 


18 


7 


34 


4 


32 


9 


25 


3 




35 


4 


17 


5 


31 


1 


Charles 


18 


5 


33 


2 












33 


2 


21 





34 


4 




18 


9 


28 


9 


ie 


8 


26 


6 


■^20.8 


33 


6 


19 


5 


34 







21 


5 


36 


5 


tl9 


7 


28 





28.5 


37 


4 


21 


8 


37 


5 


Garrett 


19 





31 


1 


20 


9 


32 


4 


t35.1 


34 


1 












21 


6 


35 





t32 


8 


29 


2 


t39.2 


35 


2 


is 


i 


37 


7 


Howard 


18 





34 





tl8 





t27 


8 


34 


4 


19 


6 


31 


1 


Kent 


17 


7 


29 







23 


6 




30 


8 


22 


6 


31 


5 


Montgomery 


21 


1 


33 


1 


tis 


3 


32 





26.6 


33 


2 


15 


3 


37 


3 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


23 


7 


34 


8 


tl4 


1 


29 


6 


t28.5 


34 


9 


24 


3 


32 


3 


18 


6 


30 


9 


22 





27 


3 


29.2 


33 


1 


17 


7 


28 


6 




21 


5 


27 


1 


29 


7 


25 


3 


t31.2 


27 


4 


18 


2 


31 





Somerset 


18 


2 


32 


9 


29 


1 


22 


6 




34 


4 


24 


3 


35 


9 


Talbot 


20 


1 


33 


2 


t23 


8 


27 


7 


t27'.6 


34 


4 


21 





31 


3 


Washington 


22 


5 


31 




27 


5 


27 


5 


30.1 


31 


5 


15 


6 


36 





Wicomico 


22 


6 


35 


9 






26 


6 


29.9 


37 





21 





39 


6 


Worcester 


18 


7 


33 


1 






23 


8 


32.5 


34 


5 


22 





36 


8 



* Excludes pupils going to elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges, 
t One school only. 

For basic data see TABLES VI and X. 



130 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 87 

Average Number of Pupils Belonging per Maryland County Teacher and Principal: 

1942-1951 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal 


White 


Colored 


Elementary* 


High 


Elementary* 


High 


1942 


36.0 


23.3 


36.3 


25.5 


1943 


36.8 


23.0 


36.3 


25.4 


1944 


36.5 


22.9 


36.1 


24.7 


1945 


36.0 


23.1 


36.1 


24.3 


1946 


35.2 


23.5 


35.7 


25.5 


1947 


34.6 


22.8 


35.4 


24.4 


1948 


33.9 


21.6 


35.6 


23.1 


1949 


34.0 


21.6 


34.7 


22.7 


1950 


34.0 


21.9 


35.1 


22.5 


1951 


33.7 


21.9 


34.7 


21.2 



* Excludes pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 



TABLE 88 



Average Annual Salary per Maryland County Teacher and Principal: 1923-1951 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal 


White 


Colored 




Elementary 




High 


Elementary 


High 


1923 


$ 990 




$ 


1,436 


$ 513 




906 


1928 


1,155 






1,544 


602 




897 


1933 


1,231 






1,532 


657 




837 


1938 


1,295 






1,587 


745 




905 


1941 


1,387 






1,618 


993 




1,103 


1942 


1,427 






1,639 


1,124 




1,290 


1943 


1,539 






1,735 


1,291 




1,450 


1944 


1,805 






1,997 


1,551 




1,705 


1945 


1,862 






' 2,042 


1,599 




1,719 


1946 


2,027 






2,183 


1,737 




1,845 


1947 


2,306 






2,439 


2,002 




2,100 


1948 


3,234 






3,446 


3,157 




3,178 


1949 


3,236 






3,318 


2,916 




2,885 


1950 


3,342 






3,344 


3,023 




2,888 


1951 


3,418 






3,359 


3,126 




2,934 



s" 
I 

I 

I 

i 

i 



If 



1 

I 

I 

1 

f 
3 



I 



Maryland State Department of Education 



1 1 1 nil llli ill! ills III 



131 



1 1 1 lii lill lii illl III 



1 1 Hill illl lii ill III 



1 1 1 illl llli lill llli !i 



1 1 1 ill ill illl illl III 



1 1 1 lllll illl lill lill III 



1 1 1 lill illl llli ill III 



1 1 1 lii llli ill lill ill 



If 1 1 1 ill Si llli llli il 



li 



! i ii i S i 



I 

i! 

i 

! 

! 

V 

i 
i 



132 

I 
a' 
I 

S 

s 

I 



1 



I 



I 



jl 1 1 1 sill- iii iii- Bill 1! 



I 



I 

I 

i 
t 



I 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



1 11 iiii mil mil mil iii 



I ! I Iii Iii nil liil III 



1 1 ! lill illl lllll lllll III 



1 1 1 Iii 111 lill illl III 



If 1 1 1 illl lill Illl iii ill 



1 1 1 lllll Illl! illl Iii III 



1 1 1 ill illl Iii lill III 



If 1 1 1 lllll lllll ill illl III 

j I j Iii i ill li I 



f 

i 

II 

! 

i 

w 

il 



I 

I 



1 



ji 1 5 5 iii Ilii li ill is 



1 



I 

i 
I 

I 



i 



Maryland State Department of Education 



1 1 mil mil iiiii iiiii III 



133 



i 1 1 llil Iii m IIIII III 



1 1 1 "ill ill" IBI "II 



1 1 1 Iii iii nil illl III 



1 1 1 IIIII illl m illl III 



I II IIIII llil' 111 IIIII III 



1 1 1 IIIII iii 111 llil III 



jj 1 1 1 llil Iii iii llil III 



I j { III 1 ii iii fi 



f 

i 
I 

i 

i 
ii 



134 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 92 

Decrease in Teachers Employed in Maryland County One-Teacher Schools*; 

1942-1951 





County Elementary School Teachers 


Year 


White 


Colored 














Ending 
June 30 


Total 


In One-Teacher Schools 


Total 


In One-Teacher Schools 
















Number 


Per Cent 




Number 


Per Cent 


1942 


2,935 


160 


5.5 


611 


146 


24.0 


1943 


2,929 


143 


4.9 


601 


132 


22.0 


1944 


2,979 


118 


4.0 


602 


121 


20.2 




3,050 


106 


3.5 


611 


112 


18.3 


1946 


2,719 


88 


3.2 


597 


98 


16.4 


1947 


2,806 


83 


2.9 


608 


91 


15.0 


1948 


2,979 


77 


2.6 


612 


84 


13.7 


1949. 


3,170 


73 


2.3 


647 


82 


12.7 


1950 


3,432 


64 


1.9 


655 


63 


9.6 


1951 


3,696 


54 


1.5 


663 


49 


7.4 



Schools having a one-teacher organization, i.e., grades one to five, six, seven, or eight. 



TABLE 93— Number and Per Cent of Teachers and Pupils in One-Teacher^ 
Elementary Schools in Maryland Counties: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



County 



Schools for 


White Potils 


Schools for Colored Potils 


Teachers in One- 


Pupils 


in One- 


Teachers in One- 


Pupils 


in One- 


Teacher 


Schools 


Teacher Schools 


Teacher 


Schools 


Teacher Schools 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


54 


1.5 


1,196 


1.0 


49 


7.4 


1,421 


6.2 










1 


18.9 


36 


23.0 










5 


17.4 


166 


16.2 


'4 


a'.s 


13i 


4.1 


















6 


12^8 


222 


13^7 


12 


17 '.8 


202 


10!4 


6 


19.3 


157 


15.0 


1 


0.7 


20 


0.4 


3 


17.6 


92 


14.4 


21 


20.6 


439 


13.8 










1 


0.7 


33 


0.6 










1 


1.6 


18 


0.9 


2 


lo'e 


6i 


10.3 










3 


19.7 


100 


21.1 


i 


0.2 


18 


o.i 










1 


0.2 


14 


0.1 


3 


2.9 


84 


2^5 


3 


7.8 


66 


5.5 


10 


58.8 


255 


52.4 


3 


6.8 


89 


7.5 


5 


21.7 


116 


16.2 


3 


7.1 


87 


6.3 










1 


2.4 


24 


1.8 


3 


13.6 


87 


12. i 


2 


0.8 


55 


0.7 


















2 


6.6 


45 


3!8 



Total and Average , 

Allegany 

Anne Anmdel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . , 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington. . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



* Schools having a one-teacher organization, i.e., grades one to five, six, seven, or eight. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



135 



TABLE 94 — Number of Maryland Public Elementary Schools by County and Baltimore City 
Number of Teachers and Principals: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



NUMBEB 




>> 

■u 
O 




"3 

TJ 


























t-i 


Tge's 


oa 








£5 






OF 

Teachers 

AND 

Principals 


Schools 


Itimore < 


egany 


ne Arun 


Itimore 


Ivert 


roline 


1 
u 


'S 




rchester 


iderick 


rrett 


rford 


ward 


c 


mtgome 


nee Geo 


een Ann 


Mary's 


i 


Ibot 


ishingtoi 


comico 


i 






ea 

m 


< 


An 


n 


a 
U 


cs 
O 


O 


u 


JS 

O 


o 

Q 


1 


Ga 


Ha 


Ho 






u 

Pu, 


3 

(y 




o 






Wi 


1 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR WHITE PUPILS 



All Schools . . a575 76 34 30 46 6 9 17 19 6 25 28 41 20 9 9 46 46 13 14 10 9 37 15 10 



- 1.4. . 

- 2.4. . 

- 3.4. . 

- 4.4. . 

- 5.4. . 

- 6.4. . 

- 7.4. . 

- 8.4. . 

- 9.4. . 
-10.4. . 
-11.4. . 
-12.4. . 
-13.4. . 
-14.4. . 
-15.4. . 
-16.4. . 
-17.4. . 
-18.4. . 
-19.4. . 
-20.4. . 

and over 



76 


34 


30 




°°4 


*1 




2 


1 




2 


3 


i 


1 


3 


1 


2 


1 




5 


2 


"i 


4 


2 


2 


3 


3 




2 


"2 


2 




1 


4 


i 


1 


7 


2 


2 


1 




1 


5 


2 


2 


6 


1 


2 


2 


1 




3 




'2 


4 






4 






33 


2 


i 



*°3 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR COLORED PUPILS 



All Schools , . 


a261 


47 


2 


23 


12 


13 


4 


2 


3 


19 


11 


8 




3 


10 


6 


11 


29 


12 


10 


9 


9 


1 


9 


8 


1.0- 1.4. . . 


55 




1 






5 








6 


7 


3 






tt4 


3 




3 


10 


5 








2 




1.5- 2.4. . . 


80 


4 




i3 


6 


4 




1 


1 


5 




4 




i 


4 


1 


5 


15 




3 


6 






2 


"4 


2.5- 3.4. . . 


32 


1 




4 


1 


1 


2 




1 


6 


1 








1 


1 


4 


3 


i 










4 


1 


3.5- 4.4. . . 


14 




i 






2 


1 




1 












1 






1 


1 


1 


2 


1 






2 


4.5- 5.4. . . 


11 


i 




2 




1 


1 


i 












1 








2 








1 


i 






5.5- 6.4. . . 


9 


2 


■ ; 


2 


i 












1 


1 












2 
















6.5- 7.4. . . 


7 






1 


1 










2 












1 










1 








1 


7.5- 8.4. . . 


3 


































1 




1 




1 








8.5- 9.4. . . 


3 


1 






1 


























1 
















9.5-10.4. . . 


2 
































2 


















10.5-11.4. . . 


2 


























1 
























11.5-12.4. . . 


4 


3 












































1 




12.5-13.4. . . 


5 


3 






1 












1 






























13.5-14.4. . . 


3 


2 




i 












































14.5-15.4. . . 


2 


2 
















































15.5-16.4. . . 


2 


2 
















































16.5-17.4. . . 


1 


1 
















































17.5-18.4. . . 


1 


1 
















































18.5-19.4. . . 


1 


1 
















































19.5-20.4. . . 


2 








1 


























1 
















20 .5 and over 


22 


22 

















































a Includes a total of thirteen seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but ofTer a junior high 
school curriculum; white — two in Allegany and ten in Baltimore; colored — one in Baltimore. 
* Includes one school having a two-teacher organization. 
° Includes two schools having a two-teacher organization. 
X Includes one school having a three-teacher organization, 
t Includes one school having a graded organization. 



136 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 95 — Number of Maryland Public Elementary Schools by County and Baltimore City : 
Average Number Belonging: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



Average 
Number 


ools II 


ore City 




Arundel || 


t 
o 












Dorchester 


o 










omery || 


George's 


Anne's j| 


ry's 






igton 1 


Wicomico |j 


u 


Belonging 


All Sch 


Baltim 


AUegar 


Anne I 


Baltim 


Calveri 


Carolir 


Carroll 


Cecil 


Charlei 


Frederi 


Garret 


Harfor 


Howar 


Kent 


Montg 


Prince 


Queen 


St. Ma 


Somers 


Talbot 


Washir 


Worces 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR WHITE PUPILS 



All Schools . . . 


575 


76 


34 


30 


46 


6 


9 


17 


19 


6 


25 


28 


41 


20 


9 


9 


46 


46 


13 


14 


10 


9 


37 


15 


10 


25 or less . . 


52 




4 


1 






1 


3 


1 




13 


1 


15 




1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 




1 


26- 50. . . . 


51 




2 


1 










6 




2 


3 


10 


2 




2 


1 


1 


4 


6 


2 


1 


4 


2 


1 


51- 100 


67 


i 


2 


2 


2 


1 


2 




2 




5 


4 


6 


3 


i 


3 


4 


4 


3 


5 




2 


10 


2 


2 


101- 150 


50 


1 


1 


3 


4 


3 


1 


i 


2 


i 


1 


5 


4 


2 


1 


1 


4 


2 


1 






3 


4 


3 


2 


151- 200. .. . 


47 


1 


4 


2 


3 






1 


2 


2 


1 


5 


2 


3 


1 




4 


5 


2 




2 


1 


3 


1 


2 


201- 250. . . . 


50 


4 


7 


3 


5 




3 


5 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


3 




4 


2 










3 


2 




251- 300 


37 


1 


5 


4 


4 


i 


1 


2 




1 




4 


1 


1 




/ 


1 


3 




1 


2 




2 


1 


i 


301- 350 


27 


4 


1 


1 


2 






1 


1 








1 


2 


1 




5 


2 


1 


1 


1 




3 






351- 400. .. . 


34 


8 


2 


3 


2 




1 


2 






2 






2 




i 


4 


5 












i 




401- 450 


26 


3 


3 


3 


2 






1 








i 




2 






5 


5 










1 






451- 500. .. . 


18 


5 






1 














1 










3 


2 










2 


3 


i 


501- 550. .. . 


19 


5 




4 


3 
















1 


1 






4 


1 
















551- 600. .. . 


19 


7 


1 


1 










2 






1 






i 




2 


4 
















601- 650 


16 


4 




1 


4 














1 










1 










1 


3 






651- 700 


8 


3 


i 




1 
























1 


2 
















701- 750 


11 


3 






3 










1 








1 








3 
















751- 800 


6 


1 




i 








1 


















2 


1 
















801- 850 


4 


3 


i 














































851- 900. .. . 


7 


5 






2 










































901- 950 


8 


6 






2 










































951-1000 


6 


4 






1 


























1 
















1001-1050. . . . 


2 


1 
















































1101-1150 


1 








1 










































1151-1200 


2 


2 
















































1201-1250. . . . 


1 








1 










































1251-1300 


1 








1 










































1301-1350. . . . 


1 


1 
















































1451-1500. . . . 


2 


2 
















































1551-1600. . . . 


1 


1 
















































1701 and Over 


1 








1 











































ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR COLORED PUPILS 



All Schools . . . 


261 


47 


25 or less . . . 


18 




26- 50 


45 


2 


51- 100. . . . 


86 


2 


101- 150. .. . 


27 


2 


151- 200 


19 


2 


201- 250 


9 


2 


251- 300 


10 




301- 350. .. . 


5 


4 


351- 400. .. . 


5 


3 


401- 450. .. . 


3 


2 


451- 500. .. . 


4 


1 


501- 550 


3 


3 


551- 600 


3 


2 


601- 650. .. . 


2 


2 


651- 700. .. . 


2 


2 


701- 750. .. . 


2 




751- 800. . . . 


3 


3 


801- 850 


2 


2 


851- 900. .. . 


1 


1 


901- 950. .. . 


1 


1 


1051-1100. . . . 


1 


1 


1101-1150. . . . 


2 


2 


1151-1200,. . . 




1 


1251-1300. . . . 


2 


2 


1301-1350. . . . 


1 


1 


1351-1400 


1 


1 


1401-1450 


1 


1 


1501-1550. . . . 


1 




1 n51 'ind over 







3 10 6 11 29 12 10 



19 8 



Maryland State Department of Education 



137 



TABLE 96 — Number of Maryland White Junior-Senior, Senior, and Vocational High Schools 
and White Junior High Schools by County and Baltimore City — Number of Teachers: 

Year Ending June 30, 1951 







































*d) 




















o 




1 


























>> 


tc 
u 


JO 








£5 






Number 

OF 

Teachfrs 


All Schools 


Baltimore ( 


Allegany 


Anne Arun 


Baltimore 


Calvert 


Caroline 


Carroll 


Cecil 


Charles 


Dorchester 


Frederick 


Garrett 


Harford 


Howard 


Kent 


Montgome 


Prince Geo 


Queen Ann 


St. Mary's 


Somerset 


Talbot 


Washingtoi 


Wicomico 


Worcester 


Grand Total . . 


*176 


27 


*10 


8 


*14 


1 


5 


9 


8 


6 


7 


8 


5 


4 


4 


4 


11 


14 


3 


2 


5 


3 


10 


4 


4 



JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 

• 



Total . . 




129 


14 


8 


4 


8 


1 


5 


8 


7 


2 


6 


6 


5 


4 


4 


3 


7 


10 


3 


2 


4 


3 


7 


4 


4 


2.0- 2 


4. . . . 


1 




















1 






























2.5- 3 


4. . . . 


1 


















































3.5- 4 


4. . . . 


2 




















1 
























1 






4.5- 5 


4. . . . 


2 








































1 


1 








5.5- 6 


4 


4 












1 








1 


























1 




6.5- 7 


4 


4 
















1 




1 


























1 




7.5- 8 


4 


4 


1 










1 




































i 


8.5- 9 


4 


6 














1 


2 






1 


1 


























9.5-10 


4 


4 




1 










1 




1 






1 


























10.5-11 


4.. . . 


4 


i 














1 








1 












1 














11.5-12 


4. . . . 


3 




1 










1 




































12.5-13 


4 


7 


2 












1 






1 














1 


1 












1 


13.5-14 


4 


3 














1 














1 




1 


















14.5-15 


4. . . . 


6 








1 




2 
















1 










1 




1 








15.5-16 


4. . . . 


5 














2 


















1 












1 




1 


16.5-17 


4. . . . 


4 












1 












1 










1 






1 










17.5-18 


4. . . . 


3 






1 


































1 










18.5-19 


4. . . . 


5 
















1 












1 






1 




1 










i 


19.5-20 


4. . . . 


4 
















1 






1 






1 








i 














20 .5 and over 


57 


10 


5 


3 


7 


1 




1 


1 


i 


1 


3 


"i 


4 




1 


5 


7 








1 


4 


1 





JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 



Total . . 




*47 


13 


*2 


4 


*6 






1 


1 


4 


1 


2 








1 


4 


4 






1 




3 






2.0- 2 


4. . . . 


2 






























1 










1 










2.5- 3 


4. . . . 


1 


















1 
































3.5- 4 


4. . . . 


1 














1 




































4.5- 5 


4 


6 








3 








1 


2 
































5.5- 6 


4 






1 














































6.5- 7 


4 
























1 




























7.5- 8 


4. . . . 


1 


1 
















































9.5-10 


4. . . . 


1 


















































10.5-11 


4 


1 








1 










































11.5-12 


4. . . . 


1 


















































12.5-13 


4. . . . 


1 


































1 
















13.5-14 


4. . . . 


1 




















1 






























14.5-15 


4. . . . 


1 






1 












































15.5-16 


4. . . . 


1 


i 
















































16.5-17 


4. . . . 


2 


1 
































1 
















17.5-18 


4. . . . 


1 
































1 


















20 .5 and over 


24 


10 




3 


2 














1 










3 


2 










3 







* Excludes a total of thirteen seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a junior high 
school curriculum; two in Allegany and ten in Baltimore. 



138 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 97 — Number of Maryland White Junior- Senior, Senior, and Vocational High Schools 
and White Junior High Schools by County and Baltimore City — Average Number Belonging: 

Year Ending June 30, 1951 







































ja 

"O) 


n 


















O 




1 


























>> 


bC 
u 


"(D 








c 






AVFRAGB 


go 
"o 






3 


V 












a; 












1 


o 

O) 


C 
C 








o 


o 




Number 


O 


t- 

o 


>. 


u 


ti 

o 












1 


u 










o 


O 


<3 


*>> 

u 












Belonging 


w 


Itim 


c 

c4 

tc 
■2 


<J 

a 


Itim 


Iven 


c 
■© 

ll 


rroU 


'C 


arlei 


« 


i 




rfor 


war 




bt 
c 


o 
c 


een 


OS 


E 


Ibot 


.S 

(B 


s 

o 
u 


OS 




< 


n 


% 


c 
< 


PQ 


O 


ta 
U 


CS 

O 


O 


X 

O 


O 

Q 


0! 


e3 
O 


w 


o 

w 


1 


o 


•c 

(X, 


3 


So 


o 


es 






O 


Grand Total. . 


♦176 


27 


*10 


8 


*I4 


1 


5 


9 


8 


6 


7 


8 


5 


4 


4 


4 


11 


14 


3 


2 


5 


3 


10 


4 


4 



JUNIOR-SENIOR. SENIOR AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 



51- 


100 . . . 


101- 


150. . . 


151- 


200. . . 


201- 


250. . . 


251- 


300 . . . 


301- 


350. . . 


351- 


400. . . 


401- 


450. . . 


451- 


500. . . 


501- 


550. . . 


551- 


600 


601- 


650. . . 


651- 


700. . . 


701- 


750. . . 


751- 


800 


801- 


850. . . 


851- 


900. . . 


901- 


950. . . 


951- 


1000. . . 


1001- 


1050. . . 


1051- 


1100. . . 


1101- 


1150. . . 


1151- 


1200. . . 


1201- 


1250. . . 


1251- 


1300. . . 


1301- 


1350. . . 


1351- 


-1400. . . 


1401- 


1450. . . 


1451- 


1500. . . 


1501- 


1550. . . 


1701- 


1750. . . 


1751- 


1800. . . 


1801 and over 



129 
1 



14 



10 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 



*47 
1 



13 



*2 



*6 



♦ Excludes a total of twelve seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a junior high| 
school curriculum; two in Allegany and ten in Baltimore. j 



Maryland State Department of Education 



139 



TABLE 98 — Number of Maryland Colored Junior, Junior-Senior, Senior, and Vocational High 
Schools by County and Baltimore City — Number of Teachers; and by County and Baltimore 
City — Average Number Belonging: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



Number 

OF 

Teachiirs 

Average 
Number 
Belonging 


All Schools 


Baltimore City 


>» 
c 
it 
be 

% 


Anne Arundel 11 


Baltimore 11 


Calvert 11 


Caroline 


Carroll 1 


Cecil 


Charles 11 


00 

JS 
V 
u 

o 
Q 


Frederick 11 


Garrett 11 


o 

u 


Howard 11 


c 


Moiitijoincry 


Prince George's 


'oj 
e 
c 
< 

I 


St. Mary's 


a; 

s 

o 


Talbot 


Washington 


Wicomico 1 


Worcester | 


Grand Total. . 


t43 


8 


1 


1 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 




2 


1 


1 


2 


5 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


3 


NUMBER OF SCHOOLS BY NUMBER OF TEACHERS 


3.0- 3.4. . . . 
3.5- 4.4. . . . 


3 
2 


































*1 
*1 




1 










2 

* 


5.5- 6.4 


1 




1 














































7.5- 8.4. . . . 


4 








1 






1 


























1 




1 






9.5-10.4. . . . 
10.5-11.4. . . . 


3 
2 


1 














1 










1 








*1 




1 












12.5-13.4 

13.5-14.4 


2 
4 


















2 




1 




1 




1 










1 










15.5-16.4 

16.5-17.4 


3 
4 








1 


1 


1 
















1 




1 




1 












1 


18.5-19.4 

19.5-20.4. . . . 


1 
1 




















1 






















1 








20.5 and over 


13 






1 


1 
























*1 


2 












1 





NUMBER OF SCHOOLS BY AVERAGE NUMBER BELONGING 



51-100 


4 
4 

5 
2 
6 
7 
3 

2 
1 
1 
1 

2 

1 

4 




1 






























*i 
*i 
*i 




1 










*i 
*i 


101-150 










1 
























1 




151-200 








1 






1 










1 










i 


1 




201-250 


1 


































251-300 
















1 
1 




1 




1 


i 


1 


1 

*i 




1 












301-350 








1 


i 


1 








1 








1 


351-400 








1 














1 






451-500 


1 






































1 




501-550 
































1 












551-600 


1 














































601-650 






1 










































751-800 


*1 
*1 
*3 






























1 
















951-1000 

1351 and over 




1 











































t Excludes one seventh grade in Baltimore County which is housed in an elementary school building but oflFers a 
junior high school curriculum. 

* Each asterisk represents one junior high school. 

For teaching staff and average number belonging in individual high schools, see TABLE XXII. 



140 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 99 

Adult Education Classes: Number of Teachers and Enrollment by Subject: 
Counties of Maryland: 1950-51 



County 


Number 


Enrollment 


of 
















Teachers 


Total 


Agri- 
tnilture 


Home 
Economics 


Industrial 
Education 


Business 
Education 


General 


Total Counties , , , 


434* 


16,818 


954 


3,688 


2,421 


2,657 


7,098 







WHITE ADULTS 



Total Coxinties — . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel - 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery.... 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's .. 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



382* 


15,536 


903 


3,214 


2,346 


2,429 


6,644 


59 


2,347 


609 


942 


186 


254 


356 


13 


335 


52 


85 


61 


49 


88 


96 


4,181 




214 


1,099 


327 


2,541 


2 


102 






77 


25 


1 


250 










250 


5 


190 




46 


19 


23 


102 


5 


122 








78 


44 


5 


125 








36 


89 


2 


157 




122 






35 


36 


1,182 


20 


153 


153 


540 


316 


10 


198 


57 


26 




42 


73 


7 


257 








77 


180 


63 


3,921 


165 


1,300 


200 


565 


1,691 


20 


537 




107 




195 


235 


1 


32 








32 




6 


275 






49 


32 


194 


1 


21 








21 




3 


79 








20 


59 


38 


916 




142 


579 


25 


170 


9 


274 




42 




36 


196 


1 


35 




35 









COLORED ADULTS 



Total Counties 

Allegany 


53 

1 

13 
7 


1,282 

16 
312 
129 


51 


474 

16 
120 
51 


75 


228 


454 


Anne Arvmdel - 

Baltimore 




47 
28 


52 
35 


93 
15 


Calvert 




Caroline 














Carroll 
















Cecil 


1 
1 
4 
1 


13 
23 
129 
35 










13 


Charles - 








23 
12 


Dorchester 


29 


35 




53 
35 


Frederick 




Garrett 










Harford 


5 


105 




54 




25 


26 


Howard 






Kent 


1 

3 
1 


20 
48 
25 
14 


20 
13 

14 








Montgomery 






20 
25 


15 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 






Somerset 


6 


20 
42 
30 
152 
169 


22 








20 


Talbot 


20 
30 
55 
46 






Washington 








Wicomico 






97 
87 


Worcester 






36 











♦ Excludes duplications among counties and between white and colored classes. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



141 



TABLfi 100 



Adult Education Program: 



Titles of Courses Offered: 
1950-51 



Counties of Maryland: 



Title of Course 



Number 
of Classes 



Title of Course 



Number 
of Classes 



Agriculture 

Agriculture 

Farm Machinery and Repairing 

Farm Mechanics 

Food Processing 

Home Beautification and Land- 
scaping - 

Total 

Home Economics 

Clothing Construction 

Clothing Problems 

Food Preservation 

Home Crafts 

Home Economics 

Home Furnishings and Decoration . 
Meal Preparation 

Total A 

Trade and Industries 

Aircraft Trades 

Arc Welding 

Auto Mechanics 

Blue Print Reading 

Blue Print Reading and Drafting ... 

Building Construction 

Drafting 

Electricity 

Electronics 

Hours Control. 

Machine Shop Practice 

Metal Shop... 

Radio and Television 

Related Instruction for Apprentices 

Shop Mathematics 

Woodworking and Cabinetmaking... 

Total 



159 
1 
2 

13 
1 

11 
1 

188 



2 
7 
5 

23 
2 

12 
9 
4 

13 
3 

13 
2 

10 
9 
8 

11 

133 



Business Education 

Bookkeeping 

Business Education 

Shorthand 

Typing 

Total 

General 

Americanization 

Art 

Arts and Crafts 

Ceramics 

Clothing 

Dramatics 

Driver Education 

English 

Home Mechanics 

Industrial Arts 

Interior Decoration 

Landscaping 

Lipreading 

Mathematics 

Merchandising 

Modern Foreign Languages 

Music — Instrumental and Vocal 

Nursing and First Aid 

Parent Education 

Photography 

Physical Education 

Psychology 

Recreation 

Related Instruction for Apprentices 

Speech 

Woodwork and Metalcraft 

Total 



142 Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 101— Enrollment in Adult Education Classes: Baltimore City: 

1950 and 1951 







Net Roll, 


February 






White 


Colored 


Type of Class 












XoO\J 






1951 




10,098 


8,478 


2,756 


4,137 




764 


867 








465 


65 


279 


556 


Secondary 


3,208 


847 


832 


807 




370 


1,120 




595 


Vocational: ^ 












1,155 


381 


390 


244 


Home Economics 


701 


612 


732 


887 




1,563 


1,409 


465 


410 




117 


185 


28 


26 


Informal Program 


474 


1,787 




15 


Speech and Lip Reading 


53 


12 




6 




691 


254 


'30 


591 












Foremanship and Apprentice Training 


537 


939 






Total Number of Teachers and Principals 


359 


385 


79 


172 



TABLE 102— Enrollment in Baltimore City Summer Schools: 1941-1950; and by 

Type of School, 1950 









Net Roll at End of Term 
















Number 


Type of School 


Number 
of 


Total 
Enroll- 




Tal 


dng 


of 

Principals 
and 




Schools 


ment 


Total 


Review 


Advance 


Teachers 










Work 


Work 


All Schools 














1941 


14 


6,494 


5,728 


4,987 


741 


120 


1942 


15 


6,994 


6,154 


4,819 


1,335 


147 


1943 


14 


6,357 


5,483 


4,548 


935 


130 


1944 


13 


6,874 


5,976 


5,108 


868 


142 


1945 


13 


6,465 


5,750 


5,052 


698 


123 


1946 


12 


6,851 


6,159 


5,428 


731 


122 


1947 


12 


6,565 


6,039 


5,287 


752 


146 


1948* 


5 


3,686 


3,421 


2,895 


526 


86 


1949 


5 


4,222 


3,865 


3,275 


590 


92 


1950 


5 


4,010 


3,628 


2,990 


638 


78 


White Schools 


3 


2,775 


2,498 


2,186 


312 


55 




2 


2,586 


2,319 


2,186 


133 


47 


Senior 


1 


1,428 


1,298 


1,183 


115 


28 




1 


1,158 


1,021 


1,003 


18 


19 


Demonstration 


1 


189 


179 




179 


8 




2 


1,235 


1,130 


804 


326 


23 


Secondary 


1 


1,074 


972 


804 


168 


15 


Senior 




337 


319 


261 


58 


8 




^ 1 


737 


653 


543 


110 


7 






161 


158 




158 


8 



♦ No elementary review schools beginning 1948. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



143 



TABLE 103 

High School Equivalence Examinations in Maryland: 1942-51 





Applicants 




Year Ending 






Number of 


June 30 


Nonhigh School 


High School 


Certificates Issued 




Graduates* 


Graduatest 




1942 


64 




6 


1943 


70 




14 


1944 


55 




9 


1945 


72 




26 


1946 


1,128 




477 


1947 


2,411 


148 


1,169 


1948 


1,469 


129 


:i,525 


1949 


1,129 


156 


°1,288 


1950 


1,081 


81 


xl,079 


1951 


912 


52 


a939 



* Includes re-tests. 

t Includes high school graduates who took tests at request of colleges. 
X Includes 443 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 
° Includes 457 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 
X Includes 322 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 
a Includes 291 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 



144 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 104 — Vocational Rehabilitation Services Rendered: State of Maryland: 

Year Ending June 30, 1951 



Vocational Rehabilitation Services 



County 


Total 




Being 




Being 


Surveyed ; 


Closed — 




Number 


Reha- 


Followed 


Training 


Prepared 


Being 


Other 




Cases 


bilitated 


on Jobs 


Completed 


for Jobs 


Counseled 


Services 


'P/^fal G4-of/» 


A OA 








1 00 


1 con 


0/4 




2 061 


459 


51 


187 


369 


794 




<- 1 r> 


2 184 


564 


33 


132 


386 


896 


173 


11 


192 


53 




10 


30 


86 


1 9 


AnnG AmndGl .... 


142 


36 


3 


4 


39 


47 


13 




385 


104 


13 


42 


70 


123 


33 


Calvert 


\\ 


4 




I 




6 






41 


13 




2 


6 


14 


g 




69 


16 


4 




12 


33 


4 




65 


10 




3 


14 


26 


12 




35 






3 


7 


14 






57 


\\ 




I 


5 


19 


21 




84 


18 




5 


18 


40 


3 


Garrett 


51 


9 






10 


27 


5 


Harford 


93 


21 


' i 


" '4 


16 


51 




Howard 


53 


15 


1 


2 


11 


24 




Kent 


43 


11 




2 


5 


23 


■ '2 


Montgomery 


176 


41 


3 


12 


35 


78 


7 


Prince George's. . . 
Queen Anne's .... 


218 


52 


5 


18 


43 


96 


4 


34 


14 




1 


5 


12 


2 


St. Mary's 


28 


5 


■ i 


4 


3 


12 


3 


Somerset 


48 


11 




2 


7 


19 


9 


Talbot 


24 


8 




1 


3 


8 


4 


Washington 


168 


51 


' i 


6 


25 


71 


14 


Wicomico 


123 


39 




7 


16 


53 


8 


Worcester 


44 


11 




2 


6 


14 


11 



PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CLIENTS SERVED 



Char- 


Total 


Reha- 


Othert 1 


Char- 


Total 


Reha- 


Othert 


acteristic 




bilitated* 


acteristic 




bilitated* 




Total Number . . 


4,245 


1,023 


3,222 


Race 














White 


3,168 


826 


2,342 


Age 








Colored .... 


1,073 


195 


878 


Under 21 .... 


1,162 


260 


902 


Other 


4 


' 2 


2 


21-30 


946 


247 


699 










31-40 


901 


229 


672 


Sex 








41-50 


691 


172 


519 


Male 


2,854 


716 


2,138 


Over 50 


545 


115 


430 


Female .... 


1,391 


307 


1,084 


Education 








Marital Status 








None 


105 


13 


92 


Single 


2,016 


467 


1,549 


1-3 


255 


47 


208 


Married . . . 


1,518 


384 


1,134 


4-6 


773 


182 


591 


Other 


711 


172 


539 


7-9 


1,522 


386 


1,136 










10-12 


978 


214 


764 


Employment 








H.S. Graduate 


- 325 


125 


200 


History (At 








13-14 


141 


30 


111 


time of sur- 








15-16 


98 


19 


79 


vey) 








College 


27 


6 


21 


Employed. . 


601 


176 


425 


Unknown .... 


21 


1 


20 


Unemployed 


3,644 














Never 








Dependents 








worked . . 




152 


704 





2,551 


590 


1,961 


Worked at 








1 


601 


157 


444 


some time . . 




695 


2,093 


2 


345 


103 


242 










3 


265 


67 


198 


Number on 








4 


187 


42 


145 


Welfare (At 








5 


128 


29 


99 


time of 








Over 5 


168 


35 


133 


survey) .... 


463 


73 


390 



* Clients who were rehabilitated into employment during year (1,023). 
t Clients who were still receiving service at end of year (3,222). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



145 



TABLE 105— Cost of Vocational Rehabilitation Case Services: State of Maryland: 

Year Ending June 30, 1951 





Cost of Case Services 




Type of Skrvicb 










Total 


Number of 


Average 




Expenditure 


Clients 


Cost 




$201,148.09 






iLixarninations 










1 n ACQ QQ 


1 OQO 

i,^oy 


$8.45 


Psychiatric 


173.14 


10 


17.31 








Tn 
<U 


AR fiQ 




1,340.65 


14 


95 76 




12,308.76 


104 


118 35 




A QA'i 


9Q 

^y 


170 A7 

X 1 yj.'i 1 


Physical and occupational therapy 


o.yo/ .ly 


60 


66.45 


Prosttictic Appliances 










26,666.44 


118 
da 
bo 






A 1 1 O 7<J 

4,iiy. 1 o 


60.58 






CQ 
Oo 


129.35 




1 7fi1 oo 


1 1 Q 


14.92 




1,292.65 


54 


23 94 




1,353.55 


13 


104 12 


Hospitalization and Convalescent Care 








Hospitalization 


26,517.92 


153 


173.32 


Convalescent home care 


545.90 


7 


77.99 


Nursing care in client's residence 








Training and Training Materials 








Personal adjustment training 


2,939.56 


55 


53.45 


fjducat-ional institutions 


42,402.79 


328 


129.28 


Employment 


1,447.00 


27 


53!59 




977.65 


21 


46.55 


Tutorial 


1,387.62 


18 


77.09 


Training materials 


5,243.19 


239 


22.64 


Maintenance and Transportation 








Maintenance 








Training 


30,092.20 


212 


141.94 


Medical or physical restoration 


2,037.33 


25 


81.49 


Inter-current illness 








Placement 


64.2i 


■ 4 


16.05 


TransDortation 










4,805.36 


228 


21.08 


Medical or physical restoration 


1,435.22 


145 


9.90 


Occupational Tools, Equipment, and Licenses 


1,084.80 


23 


47.17 


Equipment for Business Enterprises Programs 


529.03 


5 


105.80 


Miscellaneous (Other) 


442.23 


13 


34.01 



146 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 




Maryland State Department of Education 



147 



TABLE 106 

Disbursements for Current Expenses, Debt Service, and Capital Outlay: 
Maryland Public Schools: 1923-1951 





Current Expenses by Source of Funds 








Debt j Capital 
Service | Outlay 


School Year 


Total 1 State 


Federal 


Local 



TOTAL state 



$12,764 
16,147 
18,293 
20,467 
22,267 
23,297 
23,546 
26,772 
28,121 
31,068, 
36,621 
51,175, 
57,567 
64,661, 
71,448, 



,250 
,689 
,874 
,797 
,465 
,176 
,628 
,479 
,601 
,741 
,996 
,927 
,186 
,563 
,847 



$3,058,180 
3,207,088 
4,616,690 
6,196,636 
t6,323,786 
6,888.809 
6,960,882 
9,350,554 
8,982,115 
10,803,700 
11,594,496 
21,534,379 
22,993,313 
24,640,596 
27,659,372 



$46,966 
69,150 
80,139 
209,722 
216,803 
239,686 
245,787 
155,604 
520,720 
434,104 
1,234,736 
1,547,581 
1,235,487 
2,011,407 
2,080,125 



$9,659,104 
12,871,451 
13,597,045 
14,061,439 
15,726,876 
16,168,681 
16,339,959 
17,266,321 
18,618,766 
19,830,937 
23,792,764 
28,093,967 
33,338,386 
38,009,560 
41.709.350 



$789,311 
2,131,699 
3,142,211 
3,739,854 
3,964,528 
4,055,300 
3,776,207 
4,119,423 
4,063,754 
4,192,979 
3,878,466 
4,506,683 
4,893,175 
6,800,278 
6,133,501 



$4,776,355 
3,430,589 
1,955,727 
2,335,232 
1,262,309 
1,721,378 
834,802 
431,809 
817,053 
2,197,635 
3,547,469 
10,681,767 
20,338,146 
27,153,046 
31,768,013 



BALTIMORE CITY 



$6,799,794 
8,360,391 
9,312,282 
10,103,224 
10,627,658 
10,817,205 
10,620,120 
11,925,742 
12,357,985 
13,048,637 
14,455,866 
20,500,455 
22,625,966 
25,684,535 
27,113,114 



$1,052,845 
999,753 
1,568,928 
1,463.505 

tl,347,439 
1,467,042 
1,495,480 
2,265,683 
1,981,734 
2,176,054 
2,243,349 
4,779,040 
5,016,904 
5,422,725 
6,016,080 



$13,256 
17,240 
11,131 
61,200 
57,256 
55,978 
64,355 
45,953 
75,627 
77,328 
175,615 
656,839 
277,450 
717,106 
668,895 



$5,733,693 
7,343,398 
7,732,223 
8,578,519 
9,222,963 
9,294,185 
9,060,285 
9.614.106 
10.300,624 
10.795.255 
12,036,902 
15,064,576 
17,331,612 
19,544,704 
20,428,139 



$685,620 
1,580,599 
1,983,157 
2,335,256 
2,291,143 
2,277,294 
2,105,427 
2,192,721 
2,210,496 
2,349,885 
1,958,255 
2,307,374 
1,628,980 
1,647,487 
1,622,453 



TOTAL COUNTIES 



$5,964 
7,787 
8,981 
10,364 
11,639 
12,479 
12,926 
14,846 
15,763 
18,020, 
22,166, 
30,675, 
34,941, 
38,977, 
44.335, 



,456 
,298 
592 
,573 
,807 
,971 
,508 
,737 
,616 
104 
130 
472 
220 
028 
733 



$2,005,335 
2,207,335 
3,047,762 
4,733,131 
4,976,347 
5,421,767 
5,465,402 
7,084,871 
7,000,381 
8.627,646 
9,351,147 
16,755,339 
17,976,409 
19,217,871 
21,643,292 



$33,710 
51,910 
69,008 
148,522 
159,547 
183,708 
181,432 
109,651 
445,093 
356,776 
1,059,121 
890,742 
958,037 
1,294,301 
1,411.230 



$3,925,411 
5.528.053 
5.864,822 
5,482,920 
6,503,913 
6,874,496 
7,279,674 
7,652,215 
8,318,142 
9,035,682 
11,755,862 
13,029,391 
16,006,774 
18,464,856 
21,281,211 



$103,691 
551,100 
1,159,054 
1,404,598 
1,673,385 
1.778,006 
1,670,780 
1,926,702 
1,853,258 
1,843,094 
1,920,211 
2,199,309 
3,264,195 
5,152,791 
4,511,048 



t Excludes $102,501 due retirement system on account of teachers which was not appropriated because 
of overpayments in previous years. 

N. B. — This table has been revised to include all funds available in each year. 



148 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



CHART 3 



Per Cent of Current Expenditures: Maryland Public Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1951 



Coxuaty 



Total State 

Baltimore City 

Total Counties 

Garrett 

Somerset 

St. Mary's 

Charles 

Caroline 

Calvert 

Hovard 

Dorchester 

Queen Anne's 

Talbot 

Worcester 

Kent 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Carroll 

Harford 

Frederick 

VJicomico 

Prince Cieorge's 

Washington 

Cecil 

Baltimore 

Montgomery 



Received 
from 



■ State, Excluding 
Equalization Fund 

j I Eqxialization Fund 



Federal Aid 



County Levy and 
Other County Funds 




20 1 

24 










Maryland State Department of Education 



149 



TABLE 107 



Source of Current Expenses* : Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



County 


Total 
Current 
Funds 


State 


Federal 




Per 


Cent from 


Each 


Source 


Local Levy 
and Other 
Local Sources 


Equal- 
ization 
Fund 


State 
Other 


Total 


Fed- 
eral 


Local 

Other 

Sour- 
ces 


State 1949-50 


$64,661,562.85 


$24,640,595.75 


$2,011,406.64 


$38,009,560.46 


14 


.4 


23 


7 


38 


1 


3 


.1 


58.8 


State 1950-51 


71,448,846.49 


27,659,371.85 


O AOA 1 O J C A 

^,080,1^4.54 


41,709,350.10 


14 


.8 


23 


9 


38 


7 


2 


.9 


58 .4 


Baito. City . . 


t27, 113, 113.71 


76,016,079.75 




4iOA A*>Q 100 CA 






22 


2 


22 


.2 


2 


.5 


75.3 


Tot. Counties 


t44,335,732.78 


321,643,292.10 


1,411,229.17 


21,281,211.51 


23 


.9 


24 


9 


48 


.8 


3 


.2 


48.0 


Allegany . . . 


3,094,832.21 


1,531,880.71 


274,265.62 


1,288,685.88 


30 


9 


18 


6 


49 


5 


8 


.9 


41.6 


An. Arundel. 


3,197,392.49 


1 T 4 T 1 O 4 AO 

1,747,1^4.93 


1 AT O A Z 1 O 

107,84o.io 


1 O 4 O 4 OO 4 O 


3 


.2 


21 


4 


54 


6 


3 


.4 


42.0 


Baltimore . . 


6,627,911.43 


1,627,016.33 


70,400.01 


4,930,495.09 


13 


2 


21 


3 


24 


5 






74.4 


Calvert .... 


529,546.07 


364,754.00 


29,386.66 


135,405.41 


48 


9 


20 





68 


9 


5 


.5 


25.6 


Caroline . . . 


644,661.15 


459,009.31 


23,039.66 


162,612.18 


49 


.4 


21 


8 


71 


2 


3 


.6 


25.2 


Carroll 


1,345,117.64 


729,534.88 


40,409.30 


575,173.46 


32 


5 


21 


7 


54 


2 


3 


.0 


42.8 


Cecil 


• 1,062,969.92 


515,525.68 


33,156.66 


514,287.58 


27 


8 


20 


7 


48 


5 


3 


.1 


48.4 


Charles 


881,325.41 


596.528.55 


66,964.94 


217,831.92 


46 


3 


21 


4 


67 


7 


7 


.6 


24.7 


Dorchester . 


900,674.74 


576,531.08 


30,226.37 


293,917.29 


43 


2 


20 


8 


64 





3 


.4 


32.6 


Frederick . . 


1,706,470.87 


885,065.72 


45,329.71 


776,075.44 


30 


2 


21 


7 


51 


9 


2 


.6 


45.5 


Garrett 


907,222.71 


710,400.09 


26,728.62 


170,094.00 


57 


9 


20 


4 


78 


3 


2 


.9 


18.8 


Harford .... 


1,621,653.15 


693,564.06 


197,344.66 


730,744.43 


21 


7 


21 


1 


42 


8 


12 


.2 


45.0 


Howard .... 


763,658.63 


504,216.65 


23,584.62 


235,857.36 


44 


1 


21 


9 


66 





3 


.1 


30.9 


Kent 


546,612.70 


318,185.30 


11,048.97 


217,378.43 


38 


6 


19 


6 


58 


2 


o 


.0 


39.8 


Montgome'y 


6,018,800.02 


1,434,438.03 


93,251.76 


4,491,110.23 


7 





16 


8 


23 


8 


1 


.6 


74.6 


Pr. George's 


5,172,378.92 


2,622,437.88 


88.527.73 


2,461,413.31 


28 


7 


22 





50 


7 


] 


.7 


47.fi 


Qu. Anne's . 


580,227.73 


363,981.78 


18,699.91 


197,546.04 


42 


8 


19 


9 


62 


7 


3 


.2 


34.1 


St. Mary's . 


572,302.63 


375,317.15 


60,368.59 


136,616.89 


43 


9 


21 


7 


65 


6 


10 


.5 


23.9 


Somerset . . . 


605,541.44 


469,681.11 


19,221.91 


116,638.42 


53 


3 


24 


3 


77 


6 


3 


.2 


19.2 


Talbot 


610,768.89 


363,027.00 


16,656.88 


231,085.01 


37 


1 


22 


3 


59 


4 


2 


.8 


37.8 


Washington 


2,708.148.96 


1,319,468.25 


87,624.69 


1,301,056.02 


29 





19 


7 


48 


7 


3 


.2 


48.1 


Wicomico . . 


1,020,786.77 


522,916.89 


31,442.63 


466,427.25 


28 


2 


23 





51 


2 


3 


.1 


45.7 


Worcester. . 


746,442.30 


442,400.72 


15,704.14 


288,337.44 


37 


7 


21 


6 


59 




2 


.1 


38.6 



* Includes payments applicable to the preceding year received after June 30, 1950 and excludes those for the cur- 
rent year received after June 30, 1951. Also excludes expenditures made by county, city, and State health depart- 
ments for services rendered public school pupils. 

t Includes funds for teachers in the Employees' Retirement System as follows: State $1,814,120.00, local 
$517,408.00, total $2,331,528.00. 

X Includes $2,444,875.00 for the Teachers' Retirement System and $25,411.00 for related expenses fund not dis- 
tributed to the countief in these columns. 



150 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



CHART 4 

Distribution of Tax Dollar for School Current Expenses: Counties of Maryland : 
Year Ending June 30, 1951 



INCLUDING TRANSPORTATION 




Maryland State Department of Education 151 
TABLE 108 



Per Cent Distribution of School Expenditures by Maryland Local Boards of Education: 

Year Ending June 30, 1951 





CxjRRENT Expenses 




County 


General 
Control 


Super- 
vision 


Salaries 
of 

Teachers 


Books, Ma- 
terials and 
Other Costs 
of Instruc- 
tion 


Opera- 
tion 


Mainte- 
nance 


Auxiliary 
Agen- 
cies* 


Fixed 
Charges and 
Payments to 
Adjoining 
Counties 


Capital 

OUTLAYt 



INCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 



Total State 


3.04 


1.64 


62.64 


4.59 


7 


.31 


4 


.12 


9 


.29 




.37 


31.93 


Baltimore City 


3.64 


1.62 


64.51 


4.25 


8 


.15 


4 


.02 


4 


.98 


t8 


.83 


20.95 




2.67 


1.65 


61.49 


4.81 


6 


.79 


4 


.18 


11 


.92 


t6 


.49 


34.66 


Allegany 


2.86 


1.43 


63.77 


4.15 


6 


.79 


3 


.65 


16 


.47 





.88 


21.81 


Anne Arundel . . . 


3 12 


1 49 


64 94 


5 05 


7 


89 


5 


.28 


10 


90 


J 


33 


36 83 


Baltimore 


2.66 


1.92 


67! 63 


7^24 


7 


!57 


4.19 


8 


!l9 





^60 


25^23 


Calvert 


4.08 


1.89 


54.06 


3.55 


6 


.28 


4 


.28 


24 


.85 


1 


.01 


17 .54 


Caroline 


3.02 


2.08 


63.35 


3.20 


4 


.74 


4.32 


18 


.40 





.89 


35.40 


Carroll 


2 .73 


1 .86 


66.28 


4 .28 


7 


.39 


2.30 


13 


.19 


1 


.97 


38 .57 


Cecil 


2.29 


1.74 


64.82 


4.89 


7 


.37 


4 


.54 


12 


.78 


1 


.57 


45.88 


Charles 


2.60 


1.60 


62.50 


5.75 


8 


.12 


3.72 


14 


.97 





.74 


26.20 


Dorchester 


2.85 


1.68 


63.79 


2.94 


6 


.54 


4.41 


16 


.71 


1 


.08 


27.31 


Frederick 


2.10 


1.63 


67.34 


2.65 


6 


.34 


4 


.20 


14 


.94 





.80 


34.47 


Garrett ^. . 


3.09 


1.59 


59.69 


4.57 


4 


.09 


3 


.66 


20 


.35 


2 


.96 


36.78 




2.84 


1.12 


62.07 


6.09 


8 


.14 


5 


.19 


13 


.19 


1 


.36 


42.17 


Howard 


3.12 


1.98 


63.81 


5.10 


5 


.87 


2 


87 


17 


08 





17 


31.80 


Kent 


3.89 


2.48 


62.41 


2.88 


6 


69 


4.18 


16 


54 





93 


39.25 


Montgomery .... 


2.64 


1.77 


62.99 


7.57 


8 


.48 


4.76 


11 


06 





73 


47.87 


Prince George's . . 


2.71 


1.65 


66.38 


5.96 


7 


.85 


6 


20 


8 


29 





96 


53.06 


Queen Anne's .... 


2.43 


2.23 


60.40 


3.81 


5 


39 


3 


89 


19 


94 


1 


.91 


48.79 


St. Mary's 


3.59 


2.77 


57.89 


4.23 


6 


90 


3 


.71 


20 


29 





.62 


52.98 


Somerset 


3.26 


2.28 


66.35 


3.46 


5 


.00 


2 


53 


16 


64 





48 


30.98 


Talbot 


2.70 


2.09 


65.79 


3.78 


5 


.84 


4 


.17 


14 


.80 





.83 


24.43 


Washington 


3.39 


1.78 


67.97 


4.34 


5 


.79 


3 


.40 


12 


.87 





.46 


16.35 




3.15 


1.85 


62.08 


5.32 


6 


.33 


3 


.47 


15 


.59 


2 


.21 


81.21 




2.81 


1.90 


61.23 


4.16 


5 


.70 


5 


.28 


18 


.23 





.69 


10.01 


EXCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 


Total State 


3.21 


1.73 


66.13 


4.85 


7.72 


4 


.35 


4.23 


P 


.78 


30.76 


Baltimore City 


3.65 


1.63 


64.66 


4.25 


8.16 


4.03 


4 


.77 




.85 


20.91 




2.92 


1.80 


67.11 


5.26 


7.41 


4.56 


3 


.86 


p 


.08 


36.57 


Allegany 


3.07 


1.53 


68.26 


4.44 


7.27 


3.91 


10.58 





.94 


22.99 


Anne Arundel . . . 


3.42 


1.63 


71.11 


5.54 


8 


.64 


5.78 


2 


.43 


1 


.45 


40.67 


Baltimore 


2.86 


2.06 


72.62 


7.7'i 


8 


.13 


4 


.50 


1 


.42 





.64 


26.60 


Calvert 


5.09 


2.35 


67.57 


4.44 


7 


.85 


5 


.35 


6 


.09 


1 


.26 


21.00 


Caroline 


3.56 


2.44 


74.53 


3.75 


5.58 


5 


.09 


4 


.00 


1 


.05 


39.20 


Carroll 


3.04 


2.08 


73.79 


4.77 


8 


.23 


2 


.55 


3 


.34 


2 


.20 


41.14 


Cecil 


2.57 


1.95 


72.70 


5.49 


8 


.27 


5 


.10 


2 


.16 


1 


.76 


48.74 


Charles 


2.97 


1.83 


71.45 


6.58 


9 


.28 


4 


.25 


2 


79 





85 


28.87 


Dorchester 


3.32 


1.96 


74.22 


3.43 


7 


.61 


5 


.13 


3 


07 


1 


26 


31.64 


Frederick 


2.38 


1.85 


76.51 


3.01 


7 


.21 


4 


.77 


3 


36 





91 


37.41 




3.76 


1.93 


72.74 


5.57 


4 


.98 


4 


.46 


2 


95 


3 


61 


41.49 


Harford 


3.12 


1.23 


68.18 


6.69 


8 


.95 


5 


70 


4 


64 


1 


49 


44.48 




3.65 


2.32 


74.64 


5.97 


6 


86 


3 


36 


3 


01 





19 


34.98 


Kent 


4.52 


2.88 


72.64 


3.35 


7 


78 


4 


86 


2 


90 


1 


07 


42.91 


Montgomery .... 


2.78 


1.87 


66.45 


7.98 


8 


.94 


5 


02 


6 


19 





77 


49.21 


Prince George's . . 


2.86 


1.74 


70.08 


6.29 


8 


28 


6 


55 


3 


19 


1 


01 


54.41 


Queen Anne's. . . . 


2.92 


2.68 


72.36 


4.57 


6 


46 


4 


63 


4 


09 


2 


29 


53.30 


St. Mary's 


4.34 


3.34 


69.91 


5.11 


8 


33 


4 


48 


3 


74 





75 


57.64 


Somerset 


3.80 


2.65 


77.25 


4.04 


5 


82 


2 


95 


2 


94 





55 


34.32 


Talbot 


3.07 


2.38 


74.88 


4.30 


6 


65 


4 


75 


3 


02 





95 


26.90 




3.63 


1.91 


72.92 


4.66 


6 


21 


3 


64 


6 


54 





49 


17 .34 




3.59 


2.10 


70.69 


6.05 


7 


21 


3 


95 


3 


90 


2 


51 


9.14 




3.37 


2.27 


73.27 


4.97 


6 


82 


6 


32 


2 


15 





83 


11.76 



* Excludes expenditures for health services rendered public school pupils by county, city and State health de- 
partments. 

t Percentages obtained by dividing capital outlay by the sum of capital outlay and current expenses excluding 
debt service. 

X Appropriations of State and local funds for the retirement of teachers are included. Retirement funds for county 
teachers are not distributed to the counties in this column. 



152 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 109 



Cost per Public School Pupil Belonging: General Control: 

1945, 1949, 1950, 1951 



State of Maryland 



County 



1945 



1949 



1950 



1951 



County 



1945 



1949 



State Average . . 

Baltimore City . 

Total Counties . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 
Baltimore . . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . . 
Frederick. . . . 



$2.67 

3.32 

2.27 

1.92 
2.53 
1.41 
3.88 
3.88 

2.35 
2.46 
2.45 
2.84 
1.94 



$5.63 

7.06 

4.84 

4.76 
4.69 
3.24 
8.69 
4.90 

4.43 
4.62 
4.08 
5.42 
3.23 



$5.93 

7.89 

4.94 

5.37 
4.32 
3.90 
7.48 
5.46 

5.16 
4.10 
4.05 
5.04 
3.47 



$6.24 

8.38 

5.21 

5.86 
5.30 
4.43 
7.97 
5.50 

4.87 
4.30 
4.62 
5.49 
3.55 



Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's .... 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$3.68 
2.02 
2.87 
4.07 
2.80 

1.41 
4.38 
4.53 
3.03 
3.64 

1.85 
3.10 
2.31 



$6.19 
4.63 
5.39 
8.55 
6.45 

5.02 
5.84 
6.90 
5.14 
4.98 

5.16 
4.69 
4.78 



See TABLES VI and XIV for basic data. 



TABLE 110 

Cost per Public School Pupil Belonging : Current Expenses* : Counties of Maryland: 

1923—1951 





All Schools 


Elementary Schools 


High Schools 


Year 


































Totalt 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


1923. 


$43 . 00 


$46 


22 


$17 


07 


$34.84 


$39 


84 


$17 


08 


$90 


79 


$91 


12 


$77.38 


1928. . 


52.62 


55 


85 


24 


25 


42.91 


47 


81 


22 


97 


93 


51 


95 


82 


52.13 


1933. . 


51.89 


54 


37 


25 


95 


42.51 


46 


82 


24 


12 


79 


32 


82 


35 


44.34 


1938. . 


61.12 


63 


20 


35 


15 


50.70 


53 


41 


30 


10 


87 


59 


90 


87 


58.54 


1941. . 


66.46 


67 


74 


45 


32 


55.29 


56 


95 


38 


69 


90 


69 


93 


49 


68.45 


1942 . . 


70.36 


70 


86 


52 


11 


58.73 


58 


75 


43 


40 


95 


69 


97 


86 


78.57 


1943. . 


71.16 


72 


48 


56 


54 


60.39 


60 


70 


48 


34 


100 


46 


102 


57 


84.23 


1944°. 


81.77 


82 


62 


66 


04 


69.04 


71 


16 


58 


43 


116 


06 


118 


20 


100.45 


1945°. 


86.64 


86 


62 


68 


30 


72.37 


74 


83 


60 


23 


120 


87 


123 


04 


105.18 


1946:. 


98.28 


98 


27 


76 


97 


80.29 


83 


15 


67 


46 


124 


73 


127 


02 


107.44 


1947 . . 


114.54 


114 


15 


91 


43 


92.83 


95 


84 


76 


69 


145 


20 


147 


66 


134.92 


1948. . 


157.30 


153 


19 


122 


59 


124.19 


128 


27 


105 


62 


194 


71 


198 


28 


169.78 


1949. . 


172.47 


163 


29 


133 


69 


133.08 


136 


89 


115 


20 


207 


84 


211 


59 


182.48 


19o0. . 


176.92 


166 


09 


140 


53 


137.60 


140 


91 


121 


18 


208 


07 


211 


11 


187.57 


1951. . 


186.34 


170 


05 


156 


26 


141.80 


143 


51 


132 


52 


214 


60 


215 


81 


206.56 



* Estimated expenditures made by county, city, and State health departments for health services are 
excluded. See TABLE XVI. 

t General Control, Fixed Charges and kindergartens are included in the total for all schools but are 
excluded elsewhere in this table. 

X Prior to 1946, pupils in grade 7 or grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools were considered elementary 
and not high school pupils. 

° Includes State and county bonus. 

For basic data for 1950. see TABLES VI, XVIII, XIX, XX, XXI. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



153 



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154 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 112 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public White Elementary Schools: Year Ending 

June 30, 1951 



COXJNTY 


Total 
Current 
Expenses 


Instri 

Super- 
visiont 


JCTIONAL SE 

Salaries of 
Principals 

and 
Teachers 


:rvicb 
Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 
nance 


Auxiliary 

Agencies 


Capital 
Outlay 


Total State 


$146 


39 


$2 


87 


$104.73 


$7 


.50 


$12 


72 


$7 


69 


$10 


88 


$62.79 


Baltimore City 


153 


57 


3 


39 


116.52 


8 


31 


15 


18 


8 


90 


1 


27 


48.11 


Total Counties 


143 


51 


2 


66 


100.01 


7 


.17 


11 


73 


7 


21 


14 


73 


70.35 




156 


02 


2 


.72 


112.13 


5 


74 


12 


44 


7 


55 


15 


44 


28.32 


Anne Arundel .... 


127 


41 


1 


98 


87.20 


6 


.14 


11 


35 


7 


61 


13 


13 


52.55 


Baltimore 


138 


39 


2 


31 


97.86 


9 


.88 


11 


24 


6 


43 


10 


67 


67.82 


Calvert 


191 


35 


6 


37 


106.83 


6 


.81 


16 


25 


8 


88 


46 


21 


19.64 


Caroline 


142 


24 


3 


55 


95.76 


3 


.05 


7 


01 


6 


84 


26 


03 


59.04 


Carroll 


132 


.56 


2 


58 


93.23 


4 


.91 


10 


69 


3 


31 


17 


84 


140.42 


Cecil 


136 


.97 


3 


.10 


92.13 


5 


.99 


10 


75 


5 


52 


19 


48 


148.04 


Charles 


tl59 


.07 


3 


.11 


94.78 


9 


.86 


17 


37 


9 


16 


24 


79 


26.01 


Dorchester 


163 


.49 


2 


67 


112.60 


4 


.63 


11 


46 


6 


40 


25 


73 




Frederick 


131 


.99 


2 


.40 


92.04 


2 


.89 


10 


56 


4 


25 


19 


85 


73 ".65 


Garrett 


158 


.27 


3 


.05 


101.67 


5 


.86 


8 


03 


6 


43 


33 


23 


1.50 


Harford 


139 


.98 


1 


.99 


92.88 


9 


.01 


12 


56 


9 


16 


14 


38 


41.71 


Howard 


141 


.73 


2 


.50 


93.62 


6 


.40 


10 


.11 


4 


94 


24 


16 


85.69 


Kent 


179 


.00 


5 


.28 


120.60 


4 


.21 


14 


27 


6 


33 


28 


31 


51.58 


Montgomery 


179 


.96 


3 


.46 


128.00 


10 


.12 


16 


97 


10 


17 


11 


24 


110.89 


Prince George's . . . 


135 


.73 


2 


.44 


96.68 


7 


.72 


11 


.35 


9 


41 


8 


.13 


97.89 


Queen Anne's .... 


167 


.83 


4 


.38 


106.60 


6 


.84 


10 


48 


7 


05 


32 


48 


.74 


St. Mary's 


tl72 


.82 


4 


.32 


112.33 


7 


.61 


17 


.63 


5 


85 


25 


08 


224.60 




140 


.66 


3 


.79 


95.78 


4 


.88 


8 


.18 


3 


91 


24 


12 


1.95 


Talbot 


144 


.30 


3 


.71 


99.81 


3 


.15 


12 


.18 


6 


58 


18 


87 


1.10 


Washington 


155 


.22 


2 


.71 


117.09 


4 


.74 


9 


.89 


6 


86 


13 


93 


63.08 




133 


.17 


2 


.79 


87.96 


7 


.13 


11 


.82 


4 


.88 


18 


59 


7.56 




159 


.16 


2 


.90 


99.73 


5 


.67 


11 


.98 


8 


95 


29 


93 


7.29 



* Excludes general control, fixed charges, kindergartens, federal funds for school lunches, and expenditures made 
by county, city, and State health departments for services rendered public school children, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 

t Federal expenditures for maintenance and operation and contributions toward other current expenses at Indian 
Head and Patuxent River are included. 

See TABLES VI and XVIII for basic data. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



155 



TABLE 113 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public White Junior, Junior- Senior, and Senior High 
and Vocational Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1951 







Instructional Service 
















Total 






















County 


Current 




Salaries of 








Mainte- 


Auxiliary 


Capital 




Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


nance 


Agencies 


Outlay 






visiont 


and 


















Teachers 
















Total State 


$231 .20 


$4.10 


$169 


.08 


$12.52 




.L, 1 


$10.33 




.90 


$145.53 


Baltimore City 


271.40 


4 91 


210 


.14 


11 .62 


27 


.06 


12.39 


5 


.28 


87.49 


Total Counties 


215.81 


3.80 


153 


.65 


12.85 


16 


.34 


9.55 


19 


.62 


167.34 


Allegany 


206.53 


3.32 


151 


.75 


11.02 


15 


.59 


7.00 


17 


85 


92.87 


Anne Arundel .... 


223 .38 


4 .61 


155 


.70 


13 .48 


17 


.87 


12.70 


19 


02 


129 33 


Baltimore 


192.59 


4.00 


137 


.89 


14.89 


14 


.43 


8.14 


13 


24 


47.27 


Calvert 


273.08 




146 


.02 


12.58 


18 


.75 


19.37 


76 


36 


20.61 




222.81 


4.36 


154 


.99 


9.85 


12 


.42 


13.50 


27 


69 


235.68 




214.77 


4.18 


157 


.98 


11.52 


16 


.72 


5.58 


18 


79 


68.68 


Cecil 


238 .27 


3.45 


169 


.17 


13.80 


17 


.78 


13.94 


20 


13 


208.09 


Charles 


1258.64 


4.10 


179 


.98 


14.39 


23 


.97 


9.93 


26 


27 


38.96 




235.04 


3.22 


157 


09 


8.26 


21 


.50 


16.46 


28 


51 


18.28 


Frederick 


207 .97 


3.13 


151 


25 


6.88 


11 


.51 


11.21 


23 


99 


132.03 


Garrett 


220.17 


3.38 


154 


54 


15.39 


8 


30 


9.05 


29 


51 


357.36 


Harford 


208.36 


2.05 


142 


31 


15.38 


18 


82 


10.57 


19 


23 


229.00 




226 .97 


4.22 


160 


40 


13.84 


12 


52 


6.79 


29 


20 


121.44 


Kent 


274.54 


7.95 


187 


22 


10.45 


20 


72 


17.36 


30 


84 


295.10 




264.08 


4.78 


190 


31 


15.63 


24 


58 


13.38 


15 


40 


381 .42 


Prince George's . . . 


188.52 


2.22 


136 


25 


12.99 


15 


87 


6.23 


14 


96 


360.44 


Queen Anne's .... 


237.36 


4.83 


152 


77 


10.22 


17 


70 


11.04 


40 


80 


353.56 


St. Mary's 


217.94 


5.58 


125 


69 


10.93 


18 


00 


9.01 


48 


73 


58.21 




226.60 


5.95 


166 


84 


8.58 


13 


36 


6.07 


25 


80 


175.79 


Talbot 


225.76 


5.25 


153 


63 


14.51 


10 


43 


13.07 


28 


87 


186.32 




213.80 


4.88 


159 


38 


10.29 


13 


45 


6.75 


19 


05 


3.79 




208.76 


2.78 


141 


96 


13.72 


11 


87 


10.92 


27 


51 


26.66 




237 .72 


3.28 


160 


83 


11.20 


13 


97 


15.86 


32 


58 


35.46 



* Excludes general control, fixed charges, federal funds for school lunches, and estimated expenditures made by 
county, city, and State health departments for services rendered public school children, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 

t Federal expenditures for maintenance and operation and contributions toward other current expenses at Indian 
Head are included. 

See TABLES VI and XIX for basic data. 



156 



Eighty-Fifth Annu.\l Report 



TABLE 114 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public Colored Elementary Schools: Year Ending 

June 30, 1951 



County 


Total 
Current 
Expenses 


Instr 

Super- 
visiont 


aCTIONAL Se 

Salaries of 
Principals 

and 
Teachers 


:rvice 
Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 
nance 


Auxiliary 
Agencies 


Capital 
Outlay 


Total State 


$144.40 


$3 


.21 


$108 .37 


$7 


.07 


$10.59 


$6 


.78 


$8 


.38 


$57.72 


Baltimore City 


153.50 


2 


97 


122 


.32 


8 


.02 


12 


19 


6 


83 


1 


.17 


58.81 


Total Counties 


132.52 


3 


52 


90 


17 


5 


.82 


8.52 


6 


.70 


17 


.79 


56.30 


Allegany 


167.09 






130 


07 


11 


29 


12 


02 


10 


08 


3 


.63 




Anne Arundel .... 


126.43 


i 


9i 


93 


85 


4 


.99 


9 


82 


5 


29 


10 


.57 


127 .06 


Baltimore 


135.82 


3 


60 


97.14 


8 


.62 


9 


69 


6 


17 


10 


.60 


4.13 


Calvert 


115.84 


4 


63 


80 


06 


3 


.55 


6 


41 


3 


23 


17 


.96 


34.17 


Caroline 


127 .68 


3 


.80 


83 


75 


3 


.98 


5 


09 


1 


.86 


29 


.20 


1.33 


Carroll 


137.13 


5 


57 


87 


77 


3 


89 


12 


66 


2 


.14 


25 


.10 


156.85 


Cecil 


149.42 


3 


47 


89 


82 


5 


.18 


13 


25 


3 


76 


33 


.94 


36.44 


Charles 


114.01 


2 


81 


79 


07 


7 


.59 


5 


53 


2 


39 


16 


.62 


22.20 




132.15 


4 


51 


89 


13 


3 


57 


4 


79 


3 


43 


26 


.1 2 




Frederick 


117.68 


2 


43 


80 


09 


1 


39 


9 


20 


6 


60 


17 


97 


7.85 


































145.72 


i 


8-7 


95 


77 


7 


88 


13 


66 


6 


65 


19 


95 


292.73 




136.32 


4 


28 


89 


56 


5 


92 


7 


57 


3 


51 


25 


48 


46.79 


Kent 


154.09 


5 


38 


101 


47 


4 


53 


8 


04 


4 


55 


30 


12 


78.00 


Montgomery 


167.47 


4 


72 


109 


63 


6 


98 


13 


47 


5 


90 


26 


77 


99.95 


Prince George's . . . 


138.99 


2 


73 


90 


39 




34 


10 


78 


20 


55 


7 


20 


56.60 


Queen Anne's .... 


163.06 


5 


04 


109 


83 


6 


49 


4 


30 


5 


18 


32 


22 


1.38 


St. Mary's 


133.89 


6 


45 


86 


76 


4 


56 


3 


93 




59 


31 


60 


233.69 




110.07 


3 


60 


74 


34 


3 


69 


4 


36 


3 


09 


20 


99 




Talbot 


134.20 


3 


68 


92 


24 


3 


08 


9 


58 


4 


55 


21 


07 


1.75 


Washington 


127.09 






96 


14 


2 


86 


12 


13 


2 


46 


13 


50 


4.28 


Wicomico 


110.31 


4 


66 


76 


99 


4 


54 


4 


71 


2 


35 


17 


72 


1.52 


Worcester 


120.55 


4 


99 


74 


72 


5 


36 


5 


08 


3 


97 


26 


43 


3.94 



* Excludes general control, fixed charges, federal fimds for school lunches, and expenditures made by county, city, 
and State health departments for services rendered public school children, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XX for basic data. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



157 



TABLE 115 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public Colored Junior, Junior- Senior, and Senior High 
and Vocational Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



CotTNTY 


Total 
Current 
Expenses 


Insti 

Super- 
visiont 


tUCTIONAL 

Salaries of 
Principals 

and 
Teachers 


Service 
Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 
nance 


Auxiliary 
Agencies 


Capital 
Outlay 


Total State 


$211 


.07 


$4 


.17 


$154 


.18 


$10 


82 


$17 


.76 


$8 


.06 


$16 


.08 


$130 


.25 


Baltimore City 


215 


.58 


3 


.99 


169 


.93 


10 


.56 


20 


.76 


6 


.52 


3 


.82 


54 


.64 


Total Counties 


206 


.56 


4 


.37 


138 


.48 


11 


.08 


14 


.76 


9 


.59 


28 


.28 


205 


.60 


Allegany 


335 


.14 






240 


.74 


30 


86 


25 


.49 


27 


.58 


10 


.47 






Anne Arundel .... 


206 


.57 






135 


.69 


9 


61 


18 


.35 


12 


.11 


30 


.81 


249 


.81 


Baltimore 


210 


.58 


10 


.56 


139 


.05 


18 


86 


23 


82 


5 


.68 


12 


.61 


9 


.37 


Calvert 


192 


.17 






120 


.63 


9 


16 


11 


.18 


7 


.06 


44 


.14 


135 


.56 


Caroline 


189 


.39 


2 


.82 


128 


.61 


7 


66 


9 


61 


3 


.75 


36 


.94 






Carroll 


226 


.06 


4 


.95 


152 


.18 


13 


90 


20 


75 


2 


.33 


31 


.95 


7 


.32 


Cecil 


246 


.86 


3 


93 


157 


87 


14 


14 


24 


39 


8 


.49 


38 


.04 


8 


.86 


Charles 


180 


.97 






123 


60 


10 


87 


13 


40 


4 


.96 


28 


.14 


327 


.08 


Dorchester 


205 


91 


2 


74 


150 


12 


6 


06 


9 


57 


5 


.83 


31 


.59 


3 


.84 


Frederick 


192 


54 


5 


47 


133 


87 


5 


50 


7 


16 


10 


.81 


29 


.73 


14 


.02 


Garrett 


































Harford 


208 


•74 


2 


34 


156 


04 


8 


65 


13 


44 


i 


09 


21 


i8 


303 


.9i 


Howard 


204 


.66 


6 


72 


131 


73 


13 


60 


12 


22 


3 


86 


36 


53 


6 


.16 


Kent 


202 


02 






129 


26 


6 


53 


12 


06 


7 


01 


47 


16 


198 


.25 


Montgomery 


342 


98 


13 


42 


235 


97 


23 


29 


26 


65 


9 


13 


34 


52 


430 


.12 


Prince George's . . . 


188 


50 


7 


85 


112 


62 


10 


01 


15 


29 


19 


24 


23 


49 


337 


33 


Queen Anne's .... 


225 


97 


4 


65 


156 


35 


8 


40 


7 


61 


8 


61 


40 


35 


927 


.41 


St. Mary's 


253 


61 


7 


39 


160 


16 


10 


34 


9 


25 


26 


55 


39 


92 


615 


35 


Somerset 


135 


98 






103 


00 


4 


98 


6 


24 


3 


33 


18 


43 


222 


51 


Talbot 


175 


99 






137 


04 


5 


91 


5 


80 


1 


76 


25 


48 


44 


09 


Washington 


287 


63 






216 


74 


8 


37 


24 


22 


5 


68 


32 


62 


3 


48 




193 


19 


2 


68 


137 


81 


10 


80 


8 


82 


4 


33 


28 


75 


56 


66 


Worcester 


173 


24 


2 


67 


113 


44 


8 


46 


8 


04 


9 


30 


31 


33 


38 


09 



* Excludes general control, fi.xed charges, federal funds for school lunches and expenditures made by county, city, 
and State health departments for services rendered public school children, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XXI for basic data. 



158 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



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Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's .... 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Maryland State Department of Education 





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24.4 
11.4 

6.9 
7.0 
4.U 
6.(1 
12.0 
12.0 
6.4 

7.4 
5.0 
6.0 
9.2 

18.9 
5.0 
6.6 

12.0 
9.7 
2.8 

15.9 
9.8 




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162.7 

4 3 
13.0 
2.9 
6.0 
7.3 
4.1 
4.0 
12.0 
10.0 
7.0 

6'.9 
2.0 
5.0 
7.0 

17.0 
5.0 
8.0 
9.0 
8.0 
2.7 

13.5 
9.0 




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102.0 

3 8 
9.0 

7.0 
3.0 
3.0 
5.0 
6.0 
3.5 

4.i 

4^2 
4.0 

12.4 
3.0 
2.0 
7.0 
5.8 
2.4 

10.8 
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Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



160 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 118 



Federal Vocational Funds Allotted to and Expended in Maryland: 1950-51 



Type op 
Vocational Program 


1951 
AUottment 


1951 
Expenditures 


Balance 
June 30, 1951 


Total 


$316,144.44 

79,836.08 
110,689.90 
52,807.06 
52,607.96 
20,203.44 


$316,044.45 

79,736.09 
110,689.90 
52,807.06 
52,607.96 
20,203.44 


$99.99 
99.99 




Trades and Industry 


Home Economics 




Teacher Training and Supervision 













TABLE 119 



Expenditures of Federal Vocational Funds in Maryland: 1950-51 



Type of 
Vocational Program 


AU 

Subjects 


Agri- 
culture 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Education 


Total Expended in Maryland 


$316,044.45 


$92,757.04 


$131,534.79 


$69,523.31 


$22,229.31 


Instruction in Counties: 

Day Schools — White 


100,426.80 
18,729.02 
61,397.40 
6,401.00 


58,752.12 
14,777.47 
5,696.50 


26,667.01 
650.00 


12,032.67 
3,301.55 

26,034.50 
5,017.50 


2,975.00 


Colored 


Adult Education — White 


29,666.40 
873.50 




Colored 


510.00 




Instruction in Baltimore City: 
Day Schools— White 


12,138.30 
16,696.02 
6,964.91 
2,082.19 
26,352.96 
3,152.80 

1,855.96 
7,239.13 
26,006.67 


12,138.30 
16,696.02 
1,358.24 
613.34 




Colored 








Adult Education— White 




4,951.99 
1,468.85 


6.54.68 


Colored 




Co-operative and Continuation 
Supervision 




12,932.00 


13,420.96 
3,152.80 






Instruction by the University of 
Maryland: 




1,855.96 
7,239.13 
14,173.29 




Volunteer Firemen 








Teacher Training and Guidance 


6,303.08 


5,530.30 




State Supervision 


26,601.29 


6,717.87 


6,671.60 


11,185.95 


2,025.87 





Maryland State Department of Education 



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162 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



163 



TABLE 122 



Expenditures for Adult Education in Maryland Counties: 1950-51 



County 


Expenditures for Salaries* 


Per Cent op 
Salaries 


Expendi- 
tures for 
Purposes 
Other than 
Salaries 


Receipts 
from 
Fees 


Total 


Federal 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


Other 
Funds 


Fed- 
eral 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


Other 
Funds 


Grand Total 


$122,915.09 


$63,905.50 


$51,637.90 


$7,371.69 


1 52.0 


42.0 


6.0 


$14,820.00 


$17,857.46 





WHITE 





$111,756.75 


$57,504.50 


$47,200.40 


$7,051.85 


51 


.5 


42 


.2 


6 


.3 


$14,062.26 


$17,194.72 


Allegany 


23,682.50 


17,460.50 


5,456.50 


765.50 


73 


.7 


23 


.1 


3 


.2 


3,221.02 


966.31 


Anne Arundel 


3,940.50 


3,091.00 


849.50 




78 


4 


21 


.6 






183.10 




Baltimore 


19,986.66 


11,616.00 


6,285.50 


2,085.16 


58 


1 


31 


.5 


16 


.4 


3,917.32 


4,56'6'.26 


Calvert 


333.90 




333.90 








100 


.0 












517.50 




150.00 


367.56 






29 


.0 


7i 


.6 


46.00 


78.00 


Carroll 


1,958.50 


750.50 


906.00 


302.00 


38 


3 


46 


.3 


15 


.4 


78.00 


234.00 


Cecil 


315.50 




315.50 








100 


.0 










Charles 




















Dorchester 


605.66 




605.00 








166 


.6 










Frederick 


552.50 


114.00 


408.50 


■ ■30.66 


20 


7 


73 


.9 


" 5 


4 
























13,612.66 


3,776.50 


7,927.50 


1,908.66 


27 


8 


58 


.2 


i4 


.6 


48.00 


1,022.85 




711.50 


341.50 


370.00 




48 


.0 


52 


.0 






24.00 




Kent 


1,122.00 


1,122.00 






100 


.0 






306.00 


207.00 


Montgomery 


25,310.00 


11,210.00 


13,994.50 


105.56 


44 


3 


55 


.3 


'6 


.4 


2,728.85 


9,048.55 


Prince George's .... 


3,875.00 


574.00 


3,193.00 


108.00 


14 


8 


82 


.4 


2 


.8 


300.47 


652.00 


Queen Anne's 


154.00 




154.00 








100 


.0 










St. Mary's 


4,128.50 


1,220.00 


1,842.00 


1,066.56 


29 


6 


44 


.6 


25 


.8 
.9 






Somerset 


113.25 




110.00 


3.25 




97 


2 






Talbot 


493.00 




471.00 


22.00 






95 


.5 


4 


.5 




134.00 


Washington 


8,952.44 


6,858.00 


1,806.00 


288.44 


76 


6 


20 


.2 


3 


.2 


3,148.04 


100.75 


Wicomico 


1,098.00 


198.00 


900.00 




18 





82 


.0 






61.46 


185.00 


Worcester 


294.50 


294.50 




100 
































COLORED 





$11,158.34 

152.00 
3,550.50 
1,832.84 


$6,401.00 

152.00 
1,820.50 
981.00 


$4,437.50 


$319.84 


57.3 

100.0 
51.3 
53.5 

6i'.9 

58.2 

166 "6 
76.2 

166 '.6 

166.6 
100.0 
68.8 
20.9 


39.8 

48.7 
44.3 

166.6 
100.0 
38.1 
100.0 

26.7 

23.8 
100.0 

166.6 

3i'.2 
79.1 


2.9 
"2.2 

is'.i 


$757.74 


$662.74 


Allegany 




1,730.00 
812.00 




164.97 
359.23 




Baltimore 


39.84 


418.74 


Calvert 


Caroline 












Carroll 














49.50 
110.00 
755.00 
100.00 




49.50 
110.00 
287.50 
100.00 

495.66 














Dorchester 


467.50 






Frederick 


280.66 






Garrett 


1,080.66 






Harford 


1,855.00 






Howard 






Kent 


174.00 
415.50 
66.00 
187.00 


174.00 
316.50 






20.00 
125.00 
25.00 


Montgomery 


99.00 
66.00 




160.00 


Prince George's .... 




187.00 




St. Mary's 










Somerset 


247.50 
360.00 
456.00 
479.00 
368.50 




247.50 






Talbot 


360.00 
456.00 
329.50 
77.00 






Washington 








' 74.66 


Wicomico 


149.50 
291.50 




73.54 


Worcester 













164 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



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166 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



167 



TABLE 127 

Expenditures of Public Funds for Pupil Transportation per Maryland Pupil 
Transported: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



Average Expenditure 





All Schools 


White Schools 


Colored Schoob 


County 
























Total 


Elemen- 


High 


Total 


Elemen- 


High 


Total 


Elemen- 


High 






tary 








tary 






tary 




Total State 


$29 .72 


$30.05 


$29 


29 


$28 .72 


$29.15 


$28.16 


$35.04 


$34.59 


$35.69 


Baltimore City .... 


89.91 


89.15 


96 


90 


81.98 


81 .23 


87.87 


131 .02 


126.30 


381.17 


Total Counties .... 


29.40 


29.55 


29 


21 


28.43 


28.71 


28.08 


34.52 


33.75 


35.61 


Allegany 


31.03 


30.85 


31 


24 


31.03 


30.84 


31.26 


30.84 


38.55 


28.92 


Anne Arundel .. 


24.93 


23.47 


26 


73 


22.64 


22.17 


23.27 


35.40 


30.46 


40.02 


Baltimore 


22.70 


25.91 


19 


14 


22.29 


25.80 


18.58 


27.98 


26.94 


30.32 


Calvert 


48.40 


42.74 


56 


88 


59.45 


53.68 


67.75 


35.13 


30.06 


43.11 


Caroline 


41.74 


41.97 


41 


42 


40.95 


40.68 


41.33 


43.88 


45.64 


41.68 


Carroll 


24.73 


24.32 


25 


37 


24.07 


23.73 


24.59 


36.45 


34.11 


40.76 


Cecil 


30.44 


31.32 


29 


17 


28.46 


29.18 


27.39 


52.10 


59.40 


44.84 


Charles 


28.87 


28.74 


29 


06 


31.58 


32.18 


30.70 


25.26 


24.49 


26.61 




55.18 


56.04 


53 


87 


55.06 


55.05 


55.09 


55.42 


57.88 


50.53 


Frederick 


34.46 


32.80 


36 


78 


33.52 


31.95 


35.69 


47.13 


43.75 


52.30 


Garrett 


52.35 


55.37 


47 


91 


52.35 


55.37 


47.91 








Harford 


24.29 


23.56 


25 


38 


24.06 


23.20 


25.35 


25.61 


25.67 


25.53 


Howard 


30.77 


30.65 


30 


.93 


29.55 


29.49 


29.64 


35.35 


35.23 


35.46 


Kent.... 


45.59 


44.42 


47 


13 


43.49 


43.14 


43.99 


49.90 


47.32 


• 52.85 


Montgomery .. 


24.53 


23 .45 


26 


39 


22.75 


21.27 


25.18 


36.45 


36.74 


35.83 


Prince George's 


18.55 


17.05 


19 


.99 


17.87 


17.57 


18.16 


21.69 


14.71 


28.76 


Queen Anne's .. 


46.68 


46.76 


46 


.59 


45.16 


43.33 


47.43 


51.30 


58.05 


44.25 


St. Mary's 


44.12 


43.02 


45 


.87 


45.21 


42.15 


48.15 


42.14 


44.22 


38.42 




38.57 


41.21 


34 


.81 


43.98 


44.00 


43.95 


31.45 


37.33 


23.74 


Talbot 


37.43 


36.77 


38 


.26 


41.77 


38.43 


45.71 


30.45 


34.29 


25.10 


Washington . . 


28.98 


27.28 


30 


.88 


28.29 


26.79 


29.90 


121.96 


98.85 


139 .07 


Wicomico 


42.53 


41.91 


43 


.64 


45.25 


43.85 


47.95 


36.21 


36.95 


35.11 


Worcester 


45.85 


45.84 


45 


.85 


50.75 


50.13 


51.62 


38.76 


39.61 


37.57 



N. B. — Underlying data will be found in Tables 125 and 126. 



168 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 128— Number of Maryland Schools to Which Transportation Was Provided 
at Public Expense: Number of Buses Used: Year Ending June 30, 1951 





Number of Different Schools 


Number op Vehicles 




Schools for White Pupils 




Buses Owned by 


Private 




Total 








Colored 






Cars and 






Ele- 


Com- 


High 


Schools 






Station 






mentary 


bined 


School 




County 


Con- 


Wagons 






Only 


Elem. & 
High 


Only 




tractors 


Total State 


*681 


346 


72 


76 


*187 


274 


tl,135 


t°90 




7 


5 






2 




tl5 




Total Counties . . . 


♦674 


341 


72 


76 


*185 


274 


tl,120 




Allegany 


33 


22 


6 


4 


1 




t86 


13 


Anne Arundel . . 


*50 


26 




8 


*16 




92 




Baltimore 


61 


34 


4 


10 


13 


36 


tll5 


i 


Calvert 


12 


4 


1 




7 


1 


29 


4 


Caroline 


13 


4 


5 




4 




38 




Carroll 


18 


7 


7 


2 


2 


4 


53 


3 


Cecil 


23 


12 


5 


3 


3 


1 


45 


6 


Charles 


28 


2 


4 


2 


20 




41 


4 


Dorchester .... 


32 


13 


6 


2 


12 




48 


4 


Frederick 


34 


19 


6 


2 


7 


12 


82 




Garrett 


32 


27 


4 


1 




2 


65 


tu 




23 


16 


1 


3 


3 


24 


46 




19 


6 


3 


1 


9 




35 




Kent 


15 


6 


2 


2 


5 




31 


■3 


Montgomery. . . 


56 


34 


4 


7 


11 


95 






Prince George's 


♦58 


26 


1 


13 


*18 


70 


32 




Queen Anne's. . 


25 


12 




3 


10 




30 


ie 


St. Mary's 


24 


13 




2 


9 




31 


13 


Somerset 


19 


5 


2 


2 


10 




41 




Talbot 


19 


7 


1 


2 


9 


2 


30 


i 


Washington .... 


41 


30 


4 


6 


1 


27 


46 


°3 


Wicomico 


20 


10 


3 


1 


6 




53 


3 




19 


6 


4 




9 




51 


2 



* Excludes elementary school at Bowie State Teachers College and bus carrying pupils there. 

t Includes common carrier lines: 21 in Allegany, 45 in Baltimore, and 15 in Baltimore City, 
t Excludes one horse. 

* Includes one county-owned station wagon. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



169 



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170 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 130 



Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness Related to Assessed Valuation as of 

June 30, 1951 



CotJNTY 


School Bonds* 
Outstanding 
June 30, 1951 


1950 Assessed 
Valuation Tax- 
able at Full Rate 
for County 
Purposes 


Assessed Valua- 
tion per Dollar of 
School Bonded 
Indebtedness 


Per Cent School 
Bonded Indebted- 
ness Is of As- 
sessed Valuation 


Total State 


$105,802,639 


$3,670,341,860 


$35 


2.9 


Baltimore City 


tl5,531.613 


tl,702,786,319 


110 


0.9 


Total Counties 


90,271.026 


1,967,555,541 


22 


4.6 


Allegany 


3,704,000 


131,956,300 


36 


2.8 


Anne Arundel 


10,650,000 


tlll,229,819 


10 


9.6 




1 o con can 


J44d ,800,416 


24 


4 .2 


Calvert 


884,000 


9,874,199 


11 


8.9 


Caroline 


626,000 


20,263,120 


32 


3.1 


Carroll 


1,400,000 


60,935,053 


43 


2.3 


Cecil 


1,225,000 


$59,692,640 


49 


2.1 


Charles..^ 


1,669,000 


tl8.699,688 


11 


8.9 


Dorchester 


1,509,620 


34,425,845 


23 


4.4 


Frederick- 


1,192,000 


88,610,080 


74 


1.3 


Garrett 


1,321,125 


23,780,917 


18 


5.5 


Harford _ 


4,575,000 


t85,283,626 


19 


5.4 


Howard 


1,071,790 


27,018,099 


25 


4.0 


Kent 


1.250,000 


20,948,004 


17 


6.0 


Montgomery 


18,390,578 


1324,594,430 


18 


5.7 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


tl6,068,746 


tl96,912,505 


12 


8.2 


811,000 


22,659,935 


28 


3.6 


St. Mary's 


605,000 


16,389,340 


27 


3.7 


Somerset 


320.500 


17,750,003 


55 


1.8 


Talbot 


895,000 


30,560,890 


34 


2.9 


Washington 


415,000 


128,320,444 


309 


0.3 


Wicomico 


1,565,000 


58,593,290 


37 


2.7 


Worcester 


tl,435,000 


35,250,898 


25 


4.1 



* Includes General School Construction Loan. 

t Sinking Fund balances have been deducted as follows: Prince George's, $242,754; Worcester, 
$20,000; Baltimore City, $2,158,387. 

X Excludes valuation of Federal Housing Authority. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



171 



TABLE 131 



Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness* and Interest Payments per Pupil 

Belonging: 1950-51 





School 






School 






Bonded 


Interest 




Bonded 


Interest 


County 


Indebted- 
ness 


Payments 


County 

1 


Indebted- 
ness 


Payments 



Total State 

Baltimore City.. 

Total Counties.. 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 



$320 


.31 


$6.44 


160 


45 


3.93 


397 


74 


7.65 


244 


77 


6.51 


565 


10 


9.69 


467 


51 


9.66 


326 


19 


6.55 


176 


57 


2.92 


185 


55 


3.74 


216 


68 


3.59 


336 


94 


6.36 


322 


48 


1.21 


117 


78 


2.72 



Garrett 

Harford 

Howard. 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's.... 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$282 .73 


$6.18 


506.08 


9.73 


253.86 


4.93 


499.66 


9.45 


721.86 


14.51 


516.59 


8.76 


290.52 


5.57 


208.00 


2.94 


85.61 


0.65 


261.56 


4.70 


30.42 


1.12 


246.20 


5.81 


354.21 


7 .42 



* Includes General School Construction Loan. 



TABLE 132 



Value of School Property: State of Maryland: 1923-1951 





Valui: 


OF School Property*! 


Value per Pupil Enrolled 


Year 
















Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 




State 


City 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties 


1923 


$22,236,638 


$10,440,008 


$11,796,630 


$87 


$100 


$77 


1928 


51,765,517 


32,770,847 


18,994,670 


191 


291 


120 


1933 


66,030,676 


40,679,936 


25,350,740 


225 


335 


147 


1938 


81,336,202 


49.633,230 


31,702,972 


277 


410 


184 


1941 


87,253,746 


49,827,220 


3' ,426,526 


292 


414 


210 


1942 


88,171,154 


49,728,358 


38,442,796 


296 


421 


213 


1943 


89,953,989 


50,463,694 


39,490,295 


300 


430 


217 


1944 


89,951,808 


50,127,722 


39,824,086 


304 


427 


223 


1945 


89,660,481 


49,726,430 


39,934,051 


303 


437 


219 


1946 


94,935,593 


49,726,430 


45,209,163 


320 


442 


245 


1947 


96,879,433 


49,800,279 


47,079,154 


322 


440 


251 


1948 


104,461,410 


50,639,234 


53,822,176 


338 


437 


278 


1949 


120,474,231 


50,258,400 


70,215,831 


373 


428 


342 


1950 


147,205,363 


50,659,159 


96,546,204 


429 


417 


435 


1951 , 


179,725,597 


50,659,159 


129,066,438 


490 


405 


533 



* Excludes administration buildings, warehouses, storage buildings, and school buildings under con- 
struction or no longer in use. 

t Value of equipment has been excluded from Baltimore City but included in the counties. 



172 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 133 



Value of Maryland School Property* per Pupil Belonging: June 30, 1951 



County 


All Schools 


Schools for White 
Pupils 


Schools for Colored 
Pupils 


Total 
Value 


Average 

T^Pf T^nnii 


Total 
Value 


Average 


Total 
Value 


Average 


Total State - 


$179,725,597 


$531.93 


$157,934,397 


$594.56 


$21,791,200 


$301.65 


Baltimore Oity 


t50,659,159 


459.49 


t42,727,895 


594.83 


t7,931,264 


206.45 


Total Counties 


129,066,438 


567.02 


115,206,502 


594.46 


13,859,936 


409.79 




5,546,592 


366.54 


5,459,999 


367.01 


86,593 


339.31 




11,455,290 


607.83 


9,102,100 


622.94 


2,353,190 


555.71 


Baltimore 


25,190,172 


630.19 


22,844,334 


630.33 


2,345,838 


628.84 




977,197 


360.57 


710,900 


543.75 


266,297 


189.85 


Caroline 


1,991,897 


561.83 


1,722,337 


643.07 


269,560 


310.87 


Carroll 


5,531,140 


733.07 


5,243,840 


734.83 


287,300 


702.27 


Cecil 


4,129,100 


730.36 


3,952,850 


763.02 


176,250 


372.62 


Charles 


J2,025,644 


408.94 


Jl,445,354 


525.56 


580,290 


263.37 


Dorchester - 


2,739,350 


585.17 


2,480,138 


765.83 


259,212 


179.66 


Frederick- 


3,623,560 


358.05 


3,412,630 


370.95 


210,930 


229.12 


Garrett 


668,189 


143.00 


668,189 


143.00 






Harford 


6,322,000 


699.34 


5,634,050 


710.63 


687,950 


618.77 


Howard 


1,394.000 


330.17 


1,017,400 


308.48 


376,600 


407.62 


Kent -.. 


1,362,820 


544.76 


1,061,905 


612.19 


300,915 


392.28 


Montgomery 


18,973,415 


744.74 


17,739,620 


762.85 


1,233,795 


555.21 


Prince George's 


18,803,618 


595.51 


16,027,349 


603.96 


2,776,269 


551.02 


Queen Anne's 


1,185,550 


424.70 


1,058,950 


523.61 


126,600 


164.61 


St. Mary's 


$426,605 


146.67 


$349,855 


182.05 


76,750 


77.77 


Somerset 


1,169,658 


312.42 


1,044,208 


466.21 


125,450 


83.41 


Talbot 


970,198 


283.53 


745,284 


320.90 


224,914 


204.60 


Washington 


8,331,850 


610.69 


7,781,150 


583.36 


550,700 


1,805.57 


Wicomico 


5,306,143 


834.73 


4,892,360 


1,039.03 


413,783 


251.07 


Worcester 


942,450 


229.43 


811,700 


312.19 


130,750 


86.72 



* Excludes administration buildings, teacherages, janitors' homes, warehouses, storage buildings, 
repair shops, and buildings under construction or no longer in use. 
t Value of equipment has been excluded. 

t Value of school properties owned by the Federal Government has been excluded. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



173 



TABLE 134 



Revenue and Appropriations: Maryland Counties and Baltimore City: 1950-51 







Appropriations for Public Schools^ 






Total Revenue 










Appropriation 


County 


of the Counties 










for 




and Baltimore 


1 otal tor 


Current 


Debt 


Capital 


Librariesx 




City* 


Schools 


Expenses 


Service 


Outlay 




















*1 1 1 Ron RRT 1 (t 


$48,264,822.57 


$41,058,766.12 


$5,862,474.70 


$1,343,581.75 


$l,oUo,y < U.l < 


Baltimore Cityf . 


60,269,480.65 


21,863,888.69 


20,100,183.67 


1,568,005.00 


195,700.02 


1,502,009.87 


Total Counties . . 


51,359,186.51 


26,400,933.88 


20,958,582.45 


4,294,469.70 


1,147,881.73 


301,960.30 
















Allegany 


2,794,937.51 


1,725,769.15 


1,308,454.15 


364,565.00 


52,750.00 




Anne Arundelt 
Baltimoret .... 


3,920,145.05 


1,789,076.23 


1,232,595.01 


556,481.22 


26,739.19 


13,309,621.43 


5 887 098.92 


4 919 603.66 


81 4 9Q7 4.7 


1 ^^3 ^Q7 7Q 


100,628.71 


Calvert 


302,666.26 




yo,04o.^o 




O,dUU.U0 




Caroline 


365,515.08 


200,450.35 


164,645.10 


17,365.00 


18,440.25 




Carrollt 


1,296,275.48 


659,829.19 


575,894.19 


42,935.00 


41,000.00 




Cecil 


1,012,800.02 


666,683.18 


518,548.33 


75,312.50 


72,822.35 


15,903.67 


Charles 


453,622.29 


241,176.90 


194,575.90 


27,601.00 


19,000.00 


8,500.00 


Dorchestert. . . 


693,824.10 


327,013.96 


299,321.71 


27,692.25 




1/1.625.00 


Fredorickt .... 


11,702,357.25 


1,053,908.76 


787,839.24 


121,773.75 


144,295.77 


1/6,250.00 


Garrettt 


971,845.97 


308,518.54 


179,887.54 


103.875.00 


24,756.00 


5,043.81 


Harfordt ... . 


11,921,207.18 


1,055,077.28 


843,327.28 


100,512.50 


111,237.50 


19,392.87 


Howard! 


903,764.98 


324,050.27 


264,788.00 


42,699.27 


16,563.00 


5,938.39 


Kentt 


424,975.71 


278,881.25 


205,238.00 


73,643.25 






Montgomery . . 


8,629,374.27 


5,146,496.06 


. 4,345,473.00 


801,023.06 




26,601.95 


Prince George's 


6,792,455.79 


3,165,482.94 


2,348,168.66 


732,666.97 


84,647.31 


43,006.40 


Queen Anne'sf . 


434,183.51 


224,323.13 


185,557.17 


27,551.25 


11,214.71 


5,600.00 


St. Mary's .... 


384,856.50 


144,301.68 


127,011.21 


8,550.00 


8,740.47 


3,496.19 




324,905.02 


154,847.32 


136,831.32 


7,915.00 


10,101.00 


1/900.00 


Talbot 


687,637.61 


294,857.16 


228,777.16 


66,080.00 




6,253.00 


Washingtont . . 


2,356,608.01 


1,581,231.81 


1,208,961.27 


92,340.00 


279,930.54 


33,950.12 


Wicomico 


1,036,409.68 


669,651.80 


502,115.51 


93,951.25 


73,585.04 


12,131.00 


Worcester 


639,197.81 


398,062.75 


282,423.79 


95,638.96 


20,000.00 























* Figures, from State Fiscal Research Bureau, include taxes, licenses and permits, and fines and forfeitures. 

t County operates on calendar year. Revenue here reported is average of 1950 and 1951 revenue. 

X 1951 revenue information not available. 1951 budget figure averaged with 1950 revenue. 

° Figures from annual financial reports of County Departments of Education. 

X From certificates received from librarians except as noted. 

y From published levy. 

z Fron) records of State Fiscal Research Bureau. 



174 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



CHART 5 



Per Cent of Total Tax Levies Appropriated for Public Schools: Counties and 
Incorporated Places in Maryland: 1950-1951 (1950*) 



County 

Total btate 
Baltiaore City 

Total Counties 

Montgomery 

Cecil 

Kent 

Charles 

Washington 

Queen Anne*s 

Harford 

Ealtiaore 

Carroll 

Caroline 

Somerset 

Frederick 

Allegany 

Dorchester 

St. I-lary's 

Prince George's 

Hovard 

VI coal CO 

A.nne Arundel 

Worcester 

Calvert 

Talbot • 

Garrett 



Total 

36.3 
U.L 

56.0 

55.5 
56.1 

^9.1 

50.2 
^5.3 

U.2 

a.i 

40.5 
37.0 
^.5 

a-3 

33.5 
3^.7 
^0.3 
35.9 
38.1 
L0,5 
39.2 
29.3 
33.6 
28.8 



Current 
Expenses 

10 20 



□yebt Service and 
Capital Outlay 



60 



1 34.3 






33.4 B^l 




35 3 






39.6 




38.4 


1 il.S 1 


KB 




m 








m 




□ 5-2 




1 26.1 


■El 


mm 


■ 12.0 1 



* Calendar year 1950. 



Maryland State Department op Education 



175 



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176 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 136 

Calculated Maryland County School Tax Rates and Published County Tax Rates ; 

1950-51 



County 



Calculated Pubuc School Tax Rates* 



Total 



Cxurent 
Expanses 



Debt Service 
and 
Capital 
Outlay 



Published' 
Tax Rates" 



Total State 

Baltimore Cityt -- 

Total Counties 

Allegany..— 

Anne Arundelt- 

Baltimoret 

Calvert 

Caroline 

CarroUt 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchestert 

Frederickt 

Garrettt 

Harfordt 

Howardt 

Kentt 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne'sf-. 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot..... 

Washingtont 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$1.15 
1.14 
1.16 



$0.98 

1.05 

0.92 

0.94 
JO. 87 
0.95 
0.80 
0.69 
0.79 
JO. 79 
JO. 81 
0.74 
0.78 
0.77 
to. 82 
0.83 
0.87 
1.20 
0.96 
0.68 
JO. 60 
0.68 
0.68 
0.86 
0.77 
0.70 



$0.17 

0.09 

0.24 

0.30 
0.39 
0.19 
0.05 
0.15 
0.11 
0.23 
0.19 
0.07 
0.26 
0.47 
0.21 
0.19 
0.31 
0.22 
0.33 
0.14 
0.08 
0.09 
0.20 
0.26 
0.25 
0.29 



$2.88 



1.69 
al.77 
1.92 
1.60 
1.30 
1.25 
1.28 
1.00 
1.65 
1.34 
1.95 
1.40 
al .65 
1.45 
al.90 
al.90 



20 



1.30 
1.60 
1.50 
1.25 
1.35 



* Calculated by dividing tax funds received by County Boards of Education by total assessed valua- 
tions. 

t Calendar year fiscal period. 

X Excludes fvmds from federal government for schools at Indian Head and Patuxent River and those 
authorized by Public Law 874. 
° Excludes State property tax. 
a Excludes rates for special service levies- 
fa 1949-50 rate; later figures not available. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



177 



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Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



179 



TABLE 139 



Assessable Wealth Back of Each Maryland Public School Pupil Belonging: 1950-51 





Total Basis Assessable at 


Number of 




County 


Full Rate for County 


Pupils Belonging 


Wealth per Pupil 




Purposes 






Total State 


$3,980,869,700 


337,872 


$11,782 


Baltimore City 


♦1,838,873,701 


110,250 


16,679 


Total Counties 


2,141^95,999 


227,622 


9,410 


Allegany 


136,394,970 


15,132 


9,014 


Anne Arundel- 


*125,302,947 


18,846 


6,649 


Baltimore 


♦490,993,668 


39,972 


12,283 


Calvert 


11,138,049 


2,710 


4,110 


Caroline „ 


21,167,664 


3,545 


5,971 


Carroll 


♦64,517,472 


7,545 


8,551 


CecU „ _ 


61,559,730 


5,654 


10,888 


Charles _ 


19,849,650 


4,953 


4,008 


Dorchester 


♦38,103,155 


4,681 


8,140 


Frederick „ 


♦93,121,430 


10,120 


9,202 


Garrett 


♦25,085,346 


4,673 


5,368 


Harford. _ _ 


♦93,978,077 


9,040 


10,396 


Howard. 


♦28,153,840 


4,222 


6,668 


Kent 


♦21,511,515 


2,502 


8,598 


Montgomery „ 


352,245,110 


25,477 


13,826 


Prince George's 


232,248,787 


31,575 


7,355 


Queen Anne's 


♦24,248,959 


2,792 


8,685 


St Mary's 


17,521,395 


2,909 


6,023 


Somerset „ 


18,062,917 


3,744 


4,824 


Talbot 


31,836,570 


3,422 


9,303 


Washington 


♦133,515,926 


13,643 


9,786 


Wicomico 


63,183,924 


6,357 


9,939 


Worcester 


38,254,898 


4,108 


9,312 



♦ Calendar year (1950) 



180 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



CHART 6 



State Individual Income Tax per Capita: Counties of Maryland and Baltimore 

City: 1950-1951 



Count7 

Total State 

Baltimore City 

Total Counties 

Montgomery 
Queen Anne's 
Baltimore 
Talbot 
Kent 

Prince George's 

Washington 

Howard 

Vicomico 

fcrford 

Cecil 

Anne Arundel 

Worcester 

Frederick 

Allegany 

Dorchester 

Carroll 

Caroline 

Charles 

Somerset 

Calrert 

St. Mary's 

Garrett 



Per Capita Income Tax 
6 8 10 12 

-| — I — I — r 




I 



17.19 



mi 

10.63 




Sources: Report>f the Comptroller of the Treasury of 'Maryland, Fiscal Year 1951; 1950 
Census ^of Population, Bureau of the Census, U. S. Department of Commerce. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



181 



CHARTS 7 and 8 

Per Capita Income Payments in Fourteen States, Including Maryland: 1949- 
1950; Per Capita Income Payments in Maryland: 1929-1950 



Per Capita .Income Payments (in Hundreds of Dollars) 

2 L 6 8 10 12 U 16 18 2C 

T 1 I 1 I I ' I ' I ' I ' T ' I ' I ' 1 



1 


Delaware 




2 


Nevada 




•a 
^ 


New York 






Connecticut 




5 


Illinois 




6 


California 




7 


New Jersey 




8 


Washington 


BSE 


9 


Montana 




10 


Massachusetts 




11 


Michigan 




12 


Ohio 




13 


Rhode Island 




U 


Maryland 





16 



12 



Q [ I I I I I I I — I I I I I — I I I I I I I I I I I 

1929 1955 19^1 19^7 1955 

Year 

Sourt<: U. S. Department of Commerce, Survey of Current Business, August 1951. 



Eighty- 



Fifth Annual Report 



Bowie 




Total 
Colored 






j 




TOWSON 


Baltimore 
City 






Total 












! 




Total 
White 




II 





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184 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 142 



Total Enrollment* at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Fall of 1941-1950 



Fall op 


Grand 
Total 


Total 
White 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Total 
Colored 


Bowie 


COPPIN 


1941 


1,139 


823 


195 


209 


419 


316 


155 


161 


1942 


912 


638 


145 


159 


334 


274 


120 


154 


1943 


776 


537 


96 


154 


287 


239 


109 


130 


1944 


684 


440 


83 


120 


237 


244 


110 


134 


1945 


823 


580 


150 


163 


267 


243 


121 


122 


1946 


1,286 


1,032 


329 


248 


455 


254 


129 


125 


1947 


1,489 


1,178 


258 


310 


610 


311 


152 


159 


1948 


1,704 


1,372 


336 


300 


736 


332 


160 


172 


1949 


2,098 


1,688 


444 


340 


904 


410 


210 


200 


1950 


2,054 


1,634 


441 


273 


920 


420 


221 


199 



♦ Includes all students registered, i.e., those in teachers college, junior college, and extension and special students. 



TABLE 143— Enrollment by College and Class: Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 

Fall of 1950 







Maryland State Teachers College Enrollment 


Class 


Grand 
Total 


Total 
White 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Total 
Colored 


Bowie 


Coppin 



TEACHER TRAINING 



Total 


1,662 


1,259 


293 


127 


839 


403 


204 


199 


Freshmen 


422 


326 


80 


16 


230 


96 


56 


40 


Sophomore 

Junior 


451 


333 


83 


25 


225 


118 


72 


46 


393 


308 


66 


26 


216 


85 


33 


52 


Senior 


396 


292 


64 


60 


168 


104 


43 


61 



JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Total 


278 


276 


95 


100 


81 


2 


2 




Freshmen 


165 


165 


52 


67 


46 










113 


111 


43 


33 


35 


' 2 


' 2 




OTHER STUDENTS 


Extension or Special . 


114 


99 


53 


46 




15 


15 




Elementary School . . 


1,471 


552 


167 


117 


268 


919 


106 


sis 



Maryland State Department of Education 



185 



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186 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 145 — Enrollment in Junior Colleges of Maryland State Teachers Colleges by County — 

Class: Fall of 1950 







Junior College Enrollment in 


Maryland State Teachers Colleges 


ARE^ 








White 


Colored 


Grand Total 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Bowie 


Coppin 




Total 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 




278 


165 


113 


52 


43 


67 


33 


46 


35 




2 






Out-of-state 


19 


13 


6 


1 


1 


11 


5 


1 












Baltimore City .... 


46 


27 


19 








1 


27 


18 










Total Counties 


213 


125 


88 


51 


42 


56 


27 


18 


17 




2 








87 


49 
6 
6 


38 


49 


38 


















Anne Arundel . . . 
Baltimore 


8 
21 


2 
15 








"2 


6 
6 


'2 
13 












5 


3 


2 








2 


2 














5 


2 


3 






'2 


3 














Carroll 


1 




1 






















Cecil 


4 


■4 








*"4 


















2 


1 


i 






1 


i 














Dorchester 


6 


4 


2 






4 


2 
















4 


3 


1 








1 
















1 




1 






















Harford 


1 


i 








i 


















1 




i 






















Kent 


1 




1 








i 














Montgomery .... 
Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's . . . 


2 
1 
2 


2 
'2 


i 






i 
'2 


















7 


4 


3 






4 


'3 














Talbot 


2 


1 


1 






1 


1 
















4 


1 


3 






















Wicomico 


40 


32 


8 






32 


*8 
















8 


4 


4 






4 


3 








i 

































Maryland State Department op Education 



187 



TABLE 146 — Enrollment in Public Junior Colleges by County: State of Maryland: 

Fall of 1950 



Area 


Grand Total 


Baltimore 
City 


Hagerstown 


M ONTGOMER Y 


Carver 
Colored 


Grand Total 


1,182 


428 


189 


539 


26 


Out-of-state 


185 


4 


11 


170 






337 


337 








Total Counties 


660 


87 


178 


369 


26 


Allegany 












Anne Arundel . . . 


io 


' 9 




* i 






72 


71 




1 




Calvert 


1 






1 
















Carroll 


■ 3 










Cecil 












Charles 












Dorchester 




























































Kent 












Montgomery .... 


37 i 






345 




Prince George's . . 


20 






20 




Queen Anne's .... 












St. Mary's 
























Talbot 














i79 






■ "i 





























188 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 147 



Cost per Student at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 1942-1951 







Current Expenses 


Average Annual Cost per 
Student 


Year 


Average 














Ending 


Enroll- 




Paid by 


Paid by 




In Student 


To 




ment 


Total 


Students 


State 


Total 


Fees 


State 


FROSTBURG 


1942 


186 


$83,889 


$33,398 


$50,491 


$451 


$al79 


$272 


1943 


116 


69,071 


20,757 


48,314 


595 


al79 


416 


1944 


75 


*85,257 


13,536 


*71,721 


1,136 


al80 


956 


1945 


73 


*85,601 


14,573 


*71,028 


1,173 


a200 


973 


1946 


91 


108,882 


11,281 


97,601 


1,197 


6124 


1,073 


1947 


243 


152,531 


30,820 


121,711 


628 


6127 


501 


1948 


225 


210,925 


40,024 


170,901 


937 


6178 


759 


1949 


270 


236,332 


54,730 


181,602 


875 


6203 


672 


1950 


374 


262,317 


50,021 


212,296 


701 


6134 


568 


1951 


339 


316,664 


57,636 


259,028 


934 


6170 


764 



SALISBURY 



1942 


194 


$92,625 


$37,588 


$55,037 


$478 


$al94 


$284 


1943 


143 


68,922 


23,185 


45,737 


482 


al62 


320 


1944 


114 


♦87,428 


22,572 


*64,856 


767 


al98 


569 


1945 


103 


*93,031 


21,157 


*71,874 


903 


a205 


698 


1946 


153 


104,121 


22,184 


81,937 


681 


6145 


536 


1947 


280 


145,226 


46,960 


98,266 


519 


6168 


351 


1948 


273 


191,221 


64,408 


126,813 


700 


6236 


464 


1949 


258 


231,054 


54,557 


176,497 


885 


6211 


684 


1950 


286 


270,107 


55,342 


214,765 


944 


6194 


751 


1951 


200 


268,942 


38,999 


229,943 


1,345 


6195 


1,150 



TOWSON 



1942 


403 


$222,487 


$74,468 


$148,019 


$553 


$al85 


$368 


1943 


292 


187,934 


53,264 


134,670 


644 


al83 


461 


1944 


234 


*208,906 


43,145 


*165,761 


892 


al84 


708 


1945 


222 


*211,981 


46,227 


♦165,754 


955 


a208 


747 


1946 


264 


250,048 


32,550 


217,498 


947 


6123 


824 


1947 


454 


325,098 


64,302 


260,796 


716 


6142 


574 


1948 


625 


430,679 


102,645 


328.034 


689 


6164 


525 


1949 


750 


469,299 


84.996 


384,303 


626 


6113 


513 


1950 


885 


599,879 


93,495 


506,384 


678 


6106 


572 


1951 


879 


633,145 


107,164 


525.981 


720 


6122 


598 



BOWIE 



1942 


144 


$63,134 


$19,359 


$43,775 


$439 


$<il35 


$304 


1943 


104 


56,693 


15,960 


40,733 


545 


dl53 


392 


1944 


103 


♦72,307 


14,939 


♦57,368 


702 


dl45 


557 


1945 


103 


♦76,536 


15,099 


♦61,437 


743 


dl45 


598 


1946 


121 


93,004 


17,055 


75,949 


769 


el41 


628 


1947 


124 


108,230 


17,809 


90,421 


873 


el44 


729 


1948 


152 


163,153 


22,972 


140,181 


1,073 


/151 


922 


1949 


157 


172,046 


28,341 


143,705 


1,096 


/181 


915 


1950 


207 


212,373 


26,353 


186,020 


1,026 


/1 27 


899 


1951 


218 


226,790 


33,750 


193,040 


1,040 


/1 55 


885 









COPPIN 






1951 


195 


$57,054 




$57,054 


$293 




$293 









♦ Includes bonus payments by State. 

a Day students paid $100, women residents $316, and men boarders $128. 

6 In accordance with Chapter 6 of the Laws of 1945, tuition for white teacher training students at the 
Teachers Colleges was eliminated as of September, 1945. Board is $216 for teacher training students 
planning to teach in Maryland. Junior college students who are residents of Maryland pay $100 addi- 
tional, out-of-state students, $200. 

d Resident students paid $140. There is no tuition fee. 

e Resident students paid $155. There is no tuition fee. 

/ Resident students paid $171. There is no tuition fee except for out-of-state and junior college 
students. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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190 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 150 — Maryland Teachers' Retirement System: Members in Active Service 
and Their Contributions: Year Ending July 31, 1951 



County or Institution 



Amount Contributed Year 
Ending July 31, 1951 



Members in Active Service 
May 31, 1951 



Grand Total 

Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett . . . 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Total Schools and Departments . . . 

Junior Colleges 

Hagerstown 

Montgomery 

Teachers Colleges 

Bowie 

Coppin 

Frostburg 

Salisbury 

Towson 

Departments 

County Libraries 

Education 

Retirement 

Other Schools 

Barrett School for Girls 

Md. School for the Deaf 

Md. Training School for Boys 

Montrose School for Girls 

Rosewood State Training School . . . 
St. Mary's Seminary Junior College 



$1,196,769.65 

$1,102,738.40 

88,127.95 
81,157.55 
172,559.13 
12,748.47 
18,464.37 
35,367.21 
27,862.47 
21,138.72 
24,670.57 
46,544.49 
24,123.12 
36,748.88 
19,122.92 
16,479.61 
158,924.51 
126,391.94 
15,175.71 
12,091.76 
18,365.18 
14,562.58 
79,191.98 
31,544.63 
21,374.65 

$94,031.25 

$ 6,808.91 

2,250.64 
4,558.27 

$49,422.72 

3,610.95 
16,241.32 
7,176.65 
6,116.90 
16,276.90 

$21,222.98 

3,864.52 
17,027.22 
331.24 

$16,576.64 

1,321.05 
4,896.12 
4,811.84 
1,807.59 
2,329.80 
1.410.24 



7,300 

6,938 

529 
527 
1,090 

90 
124 
244 
186 
145 
167 
296 
157 
251 
135 
104 
837 
795 
104 

83 
130 

97 
472 
218 
157 

362 

30 

11 
19 

157 

18 
8 
29 
28 
74 

92 

27 
63 
2 

83 



10 



Maryland State Department of Education 



191 



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192 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 152 — Income by Source and Amount per Capita: Maryland Libraries Open 
to the Public: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



County 


Source of Income 


Amount 

pel 
Capita 


1950 Popu- 
lation 
Census 


Total 




City or 
District 


State* 


Other 




$1,977,256 


$284,738 


$1,535,890 


$51,809 


$104,819 


$ .84 


2,d4d,0Ul 


Baltimore City 


1,417,801 




1,378,557 


17,182 


22,062 


1.49 


949,708 


Total Counties 


559,455 


284,738 


157,333 


34,627 


82,757 


.40 


1,393,293 




22,250 




20,000 




2,250 


.25 


89,556 


Anne Arundel 


33,194 


24,762 


1,000 


4,i63 


3,329 


.28 


117,392 


Baltimore 


109,066 


97,597 




6,233 


5,236 


.40 


270,273 


Calvert 














12,100 


Caroline 


466 








466 


'.03 


18,234 


CarroUf 














44,907 


Cecilt 


18,494 


15,904 




2',ii3 


'477 


'.55 


33,356 




11,354 


7,000 




939 


3,415 


.48 


23,415 


Dorchester 


3,181 


1,500 


■956 




731 


.11 


27,815 




18,796 








18,796 


.30 


62,287 




6,805 


4,965 




1,758 


82 


.32 


21.259 


Harford 


21,805 


18,733 




2,104 


968 


.42 


51,782 




7,327 


5,737 




1,374 


216 


.32 


23,119 


Kentt 














13,677 


Montgomery 


123,550 


9,890 


103,793 




9,867 


.75 


164,401 


Prince George's . . . 


61,595 


43,006 


12,630 


5,369 


590 


.32 


194,182 


Queen Anne's .... 


9,070 


5,614 




1,174 


2,282 


.62 


14,579 


St. Mary's 


20,281 


7,106 




1,755 


11,420 


.70 


29,111 


Somerset! 


1,414 


900 


'266 




314 


.07 


20,745 


Talbot 


15,026 


6,253 


2,500 


1,563 


4,770 


.77 


19.428 




59,622 


23,640 


15,760 


4,130 


16,092 


.76 


78,886 


Wicomico 


15,106 


12,131 




2,072 


903 


.38 


39,641 


Worcester 


1,053 




■566 




553 


.05 


23,148 



* Excludes appropriation of $85,624 for Division of Library Extension, 
t Incomplete report. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



193 



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Eighty-Fifth Antnual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



195 



TABLE 155 

Report of School Dental Clinics Conducted Under the Auspices of the Maryland State 
Department of Health: July 1, 1950 to June 30, 1951 



County 


Number of 
Clinicians 


Time* 
Given to 
Service 


Number of 
Children 


Number of 


Ex- 
amined by 
Dentist 


Treated 


Total 
Opera- 
tions 


Fillings 
Inserted 


Teeth 
Extracted 


Clean- 
ings 


Treat- 
ments 


Total 


29 




43,606 


6,084 


31,952 


17,147 


6,785 


3,350 


4,670 


Allegany 


1 


Full 


3,978 


848 


3,656 


567 


1,376 


377 


1,336 


Anne Arundel 


1 


Part 


267 


117 


265 


148 


117 






Baltimore 


16 


Part 


20,204 


2,357 


15,156 


9,613 


3,036 


1,705 


802 


Calvert 


2 


Part 


290 


45 


202 


122 


66 


5 


9 


Caroline 


1 


Part 


228 


42 


194 


134 


35 


23 


2 


Frederick 


1 


Part 


169 


153 


436 


316 


65 


3 


52 


Harford 


2 


Part 


1,434 


142 


1,123 


364 


417 


204 


138 


Howard 


1 


Part 


264 


116 


275 


95 


95 


67 


18 


Kent 


1 


Part 


553 


68 


628 


382 


160 


35 


51 




1 


Full 


13,172 


863 


3,936 


2,185 


759 


7 


985 


Washington 


2 


Full 


3,047 


1,333 


6,081 


3,221 


659 


924 


1,277 



* The scope of service varies, either full-time or part-time, meaning one or more one-day clinics per month. 



196 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



199 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Maryland State Department of Education Financial Statement: Fiscal Year Ending 

June 30, 1951 



Source or Purpose Amount 



RECEIPTS 



Balance Forwarded from 1949-1950 $ 6,984.47 

General Fund Appropriation 503,668.00 

Receipts to Budget Items 104,257.73 



Total Funds Available $614,910.20 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Salaries, Wages and Special Payments $508,250.12 

General Repairs 702.97 

Motor Vehicle Repairs 1,321.77 

Light, Heat, Power and Water 42.00 

Travel 28,920.98 

Transportation 777.28 

Communication 14,695.65 

Printing Other than Office Supplies 4,778.90 

All Other Contractual Services 2,163.45 

Office Supplies 5,861.49 

Educational, Vocational and Recreational Supplies 6,510.40 

Motor Vehicle Supplies 5,876.30 

Office Equipment 3,866.67 

Household Equipment 27.60 

Motor Vehicles 8,676.61 

Educational, Vocational and Recreational Equipment 177.00 

Rent 1,705.70 

Insurance r 987.90 



Total Disbursements $595,342.79 

Unexpended Balance Returned to State Treasury $15,497.57 

Balance, June 30, 1951 $4,069.84 



200 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges Financial Statement: Fiscal Year Ending 

June 30, 1951 



Source or Purpose 


TOWSON 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Bowie 


COPPIK 




R 


ECEIPTS 









Balance Forwarded from 

1949-1950 

General Fund Appropriation 

Student Fees 

Receipts to Budget Items 

Transfers by Budget Amendments 



$ 16,592.28 
523,823.00 
107,163.62 
44,505.85 



$ 15,475.77 
237,398.00 
31,189.26 
42,019.29 
23,000.00 



Total Funds Available $692,084.75 $349,082.32 $309,714.51 $271,440.42 $ 61,775.10 



$ 30,072.53 
230,167.00 
38,999.00 
10,475.98 



$ 20,055.71 
187,531.00 
33,749.71 
30,104.00 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Salaries, Wages, and Special 
Payments 

General Repairs 

Motor Vehicle Repairs 

Light, Heat, Power, and Water ... 

Travel 

Transportation 

Communication _ 

Printing Other than Office 

Supplies 

All Other Contractual Services ... 

Food 

Forage and Veterinary Supplies... 

Fuel 

Office Supplies 

Medical and Laboratory Supplies 

Laundry, Cleaning and Disin- 
fecting Supplies 

Refrigeration Supplies 

Educational, Vocational and 
Recreational Supplies 

Agricultural and Botanical 

Supplies 

Motor Vehicle Supplies 

Power Plant Supplies 

Wearing Apparel 

Household Supplies 

All Other Supplies 

Building Materials 

Motor Vehicle Materials 

Equipment Materials 

Highway Materials 

Office Equipment 

Household Equipment — 

Medical and Laboratory 

Equipment 

Motor Vehicles - 

Educational, Vocational and 
Recreational Equipment 

Tools and Machinery 

All Other Equipment 

Nonstructural Improvements 

Rent 

Insurance 

All Other Fixed Charges 

Cafeteria 

Veterans' Clearing Account 

Prior Year Funds 

Refunds on Students' Fees 

Summer Session 

Miscellaneous 



Total Disbursements 



Unexpended Balance Returned 
to State Treasury 



Balance, June 30, 1951. 



$471,071.94 
8,516.53 
234.73 
11,040.92 
1,931.15 
164.74 
4,741.32 

2,724.44 
616.67 
68,839.40 



17,973.08 
3,458.75 
566.95 

2,197.43 
47.00 

5,455.44 

159.88 
1,730.44 

323.31 

378.60 
4,207.83 

534.29 
5,330.08 



175.89 



2,554.10 
1,875.74 



3,705.75 

11,151.18 
1,409.92 
95.58 



215.00 
612.22 
476.50 

26^640!32 
6,259.15 
1,571.50 

12,585.44 
938.05 



$214,899.50 
4,386.84 
214.89 
4,498.93 
927.53 
69.25 
1,748.97 

1,510.15 
1,599.95 
28,770.41 



$682,511.26 

$ 2,571.99 
$ 7,001.50 



5,599.37 
1,271.39 
528.41 

291.85 



3,301.69 

199.95 
776.45 
178.27 

2^657r49 
99.83 
1,484.10 



923.33 
2,731.03 



105.66 



7,384.56 
200.00 



1,800.00 
60.00 
196.80 



34.00 
22,722.34 
13,124.67 
4,275.00 



$328,572.61 

$ 2,551.10 
$ 17,958.61 



$181,275.62 
1,948.79 
338.75 
5,756.32 
1,816.58 
27.83 
1,430.23 

902.10 
1,637.88 
25,467.75 



6,003.65 
522.71 
836.88 

976.03 
10.40 

4,539.31 

106.92 
1,351.41 



2,970.07 
56.85 
2,559.68 



335.36 
603.39 
2,675.54 

660.58 
3,965.00 

5,363.40 
99.04 



344.23 



7,867.64 
27,917.89 
893.00 



$291,260.83 

$ 2,967.78 
$ 15,485.90 



$141,126.55 
9,300.00 
502.34 
5,855.66 
385.79 
70.89 
1,243.62 

1,183.66 
1,341.82 
42,568.87 
761.48 
4,971.00 
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465.95 
379.00 

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919.81 



12,919.43 
8,919.68 
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439.49 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



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Maryland State Department of Education 229 

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50 —I --I T-H 



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to l« <M eo 05 
<M to (M 



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CO *0 * »^ 1-^ ■ CO CO CO 



■ CO CO r-H y-* T-H CO 



00 «0 IN ■ 



^ O 00 OO <M 



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05 05 ■«*< < 



CO 0> >0 >C • 00 



t>. lO ,-1 Tj< (M 



CO a> >o «o •"S' • 00 c<j 



CO <M O • ^ 



tesoot^tti CO ■<»< 00 00 CO 



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t>. ?0 00 05 



00 to (M (M to • 
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r-i-^-Tf^oo— ie<«tD 

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CO (M 'Ji 03 to »0 (M »0 CO-flOO- 



CO ■ OO <M . 



I OOO O CO CO 



i-H • «0 CO iC 00-^ ^ — O O ' 



> <-i CO Oj (M "5 ^ r-c 



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to t>. 

CO to CO CO 



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> CO TT CO 00 CO CO O ifS 



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CO CO to 

O C^ CO ^ CO 



COOt^COCOi^OSO 
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CO CO CO CO -H 



CO l« CO CO 



t^«ocototoo>tot^cot^o>t^ 
coco-^oooco-^iocoooeo^ 
CO ^ CO CO CO CO «o us 



c 2 

V « 
Xo 

< 



ooooo 



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05 o 05 o o 

00 U5 o6 i-< Tfi 



OOOOOOOOOO 

o6t>lcoo6io^eood 



O us 00 CO »o 

t>. OO ITS OO 



it^ooor^-^ostoosoit^ 
ICO— I — to — o6eoo6«ocot^ 



us lO CO (M — CO ' 



CO CO — CO US 
-rfi CO us 0> 



— 05 us us 



CO CO CO CO CO 



t~-. 05 CO T»< CO 
CO CO CO CO 
CO CO CO CO CO 



— Hcoousooco-*|^- 



t^ CO CO us 00 

^ CO us 00 -Tfi 
— O tS* CO 



— cotooooo — oooococot^oo 

ttO-^OCOUS'-iOCOCO'— ICO 
XSOSCOCO'^'^OUSUSt^'^tO 

-hO — cooo5-<rTj>oo>ooo 
CQCocococo'^eoeO'— I — coco 



a 



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a :g H 



O JO tCQ «« .S.= -; 

o 53 •- S c-^ 

5 i 8'l « s « ^ o 



Maryland State Department of Education 



233 




234 Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE XXIII— Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each Maryland County 



County 
High School 


Total 
Enrollment 


Core 


English 


Social 
Studies 


Science 


Mathe- 
matics 


Latin 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 






1 KCK 
O ,000 


,490 


289 


Ho 


,^90 


3 ,248 


3 ,021 


2 ,851 


3 ,116 


2 ,775 


2 ,872 


2 ,483 


197 


298 


2 


nirlfnmn Sr . Tr 


103 


112 






103 


112 


103 


112 


99 


105 


100 


111 










138 


115 


28 


25 


110 


90 


110 


90 


137 


95 


121 


88 








Vnri Hill Sr -Tr 


919 


931 






919 


931 


821 


747 


800 


706 


788 


638 


53 


85 






764 


758 






764 


758 


700 


669 


606 


577 


540 


494 


65 


85 






299 


328 


37 


31 


262 


297 


238 


254 


238 


255 


221 


200 


27 


40 


7 
1 


■Rorfrin Sr _ Tr 


91 


101 


38 


27 


53 


74 


53 


74 


90 


78 


79 


85 






g 


Ppnfral Sr - Tr 


284 


262 


38 


35 


246 


227 


226 


200 


238 


215 


212 


207 


33 


35 


9 


Beall Sr.-Jr 


519 


490 


17 


10 


502 


480 


433 


426 


470 


349 


371 


287 


19 


53 


10 




114 


105 


37 


38 


77 


67 


77 


67 


114 


105 


114 


105 






2j 


StiviiffP Tr 


95 


74 






95 


74 


95 


74 


95 


74 


95 


74 






12 


"Ppnn A VP Tr.lpm Tt 


79 


78 


79 


78 










79 


78 


79 


78 






13 


"Rpnll F.lpm Tr 


125 


96 


15 


4 


110 


92 


110 


92 


110 


92 


110 


92 






14 


r^iirvpr r^nlnrpH Sr — Tr 


55 


46 






55 


46 


55 


46 


40 


46 


42 


24 






15 


Anne Arundel 


3,439 


3,540 


1,475 


1,495 


1,962 


2,045 


1,830 


1,897 


2,210 


2,008 


2,564 


2,574 


69 


109 


16 


Glen Burni6 Sr 


467 


489 






467 


489 


384 


416 


381 


252 


245 


267 


22 


37 


17 


Southern Sr ~ Jr 


159 


170 






159 


170 


150 


162 


131 


143 


130 


124 






18 


Arundel Sr -Jr 


398 


438 


2i3 


2i8 


185 


220 


161 


179 


262 


232 


369 


372 


1 


5 


19 


Annapolis Sr -Jr 


434 


472 






432 


472 


429 


470 


236 


252 


291 


299 


43 


63 


20 


George Fox Jr 


340 


283 


340 


283 










201 


171 


201 


171 






21 


Brooklyn Park Jr 


119 


115 


119 


115 










64 


53 


64 


53 






22 


Brooklyn Park Jr, — Annex 


69 


47 






69 


47 


69 


47 


69 


47 


69 


47 






23 


Glpn Burnie Jr 


431 


406 






431 


406 


431 


406 


431 


406 


431 


406 






24 


Ann3.polis Jr 


338 


355 


338 


355 










166 


167 


166 


167 








T^5»fp<3 Hnlorpfl Sr-Tr 


684 


765 


465 


524 


2i9 


24i 


206 


217 


269 


285 


598 


668 


3 


4 


26 


B A LTIMORE 


7,621 

936 


7,725 


5,136 


4,968 


2,428 


2,66^ 


2,479 


2,743 


6,986 


6,451 


6,503 


5,867 


232 


328 


27 


Cadionsville Sr ~Jr 


933 


504 


483 


432 


450 


432 


448 


850 


732 


725 


614 


79 


100 


28 


Milford MiU Sr.-Jr 


531 


531 


384 


359 


147 


172 


147 


170 


509 


478 


459 


420 


19 


28 


29 




314 


343 


194 


206 


120 


137 


117 


137 


273 


242 


244 


248 


6 


15 


01/ 


Sr>QrL-a Sr . Tr 


159 


153 


58 


50 


101 


103 


101 


103 


145 


123 


97 


76 






ol 




718 


790 


262 


201 


399 


500 


456 


579 


512 


381 


522 


417 


43 


7i 


32 


Dundalk Sr.-Jr 


787 


792 


472 


467 


o'l e 
ol5 


325 


315 


325 


737 


673 


644 


040 


44 


49 


33 




680 


656 


123 


118 


557 


538 


555 


538 


538 


446 


443 


275 


41 


66 


Q/1 

04 




434 


486 


241 


260 


193 


226 


192 


226 


360 


353 


325 


290 






35 


T?if+K T^icfT-irt* Ti» 


58 


67 


58 


67 










58 


67 


58 


67 






36 




58 


57 


58 


57 










58 


57 


58 


57 






37 




60 


60 


60 


60 










60 


60 


60 


60 






QQ 
00 




548 


528 


548 


528 










548 


528 


548 


528 






39 




106 


92 


106 


92 










106 


92 


106 


92 






40 




1 ,142 


1,129 


1 ,142 


1,129 










1,142 


1,129 


1,142 


1,129 






41 


10 Elem. Schools with Jr. 7th 


513 


447 


513 


447 










513 


447 


513 


447 






42 


1 > „ ^1 , f"* ^1 CJ- T„ 


80 


86 


56 


55 


24 


si 


24 


31 


80 


85 


80 


86 






43 




152 


191 


106 


123 


46 


68 


46 


68 


152 


191 


139 


169 






44 


boilers roint Lolored or .-Jr. 


319 


355 


225 


237 


94 


118 


94 


118 


319 


338 


314 


320 






45 




26 


29 


26 


29 










26 


29 


26 


29 






46 




457 


455 






457 


454 


434 


440 


398 


398 


337 


342 


25 


41 


47 




265 


245 






265 


245 


254 


236 


229 


205 


207 


187 


25 


41 


48 




192 


210 






192 


209 


180 


204 


169 


193 


130 


155 






49 




769 


741 


371 


339 


398 


402 


427 


415 


720 


645 


587 


574 


13 


32 


50 




150 


148 


76 


80 


74 


68 


93 


68 


147 


122 


95 


99 






51 




171 


160 


96 


80 


75 


80 


75 


83 


147 


127 


104 


100 


6 


9 


52 




87 


71 


41 


30 


46 


41 


46 


41 


70 


57 


65 


58 


2 


9 


53 




143 


153 


67 


52 


76 


101 


75 


95 


138 


130 


122 


128 


5 


14 


54 




50 


41 


24 


21 


26 


20 


26 


20 


50 


41 


44 


37 






55 


Lockerman Colored Sr.-Jr. . . 


168 


168 


67 


76 


101 


92 


112 


108 


168 


168 


157 


152 






56 




1,533 


1,583 






1,533 


1,583 


1,527 


1,583 


1,420 


1,385 


1,269 


1,145 


37 


57 


57 




130 


143 






130 


143 


130 


143 


123 


125 


122 


124 


9 


16 


58 


ci_.i o_ T_ 


178 


188 






178 


188 


178 


188 


169 


148 


149 


118 






59 




140 


137 






140 


137 


140 


137 


139 


111 


112 


104 






60 


Westminster Sr.-Jr 


511 


533 






511 


533 


510 


533 


464 


479 


411 


356 


28 




61 




113 


102 






113 


102 


112 


102 


112 


87 


98 


72 






62 




99 


95 






99 


95 


97 


95 


95 


83 


75 


70 






63 


Elmer Wolfe Sr.-Jr 


99 


95 






99 


95 


97 


95 


99 


88 


69 


61 






64 




140 


175 






140 


175 


140 


175 


96 


149 


110 


125 






65 




43 


46 






43 


46 


43 


46 


43 


46 


43 


46 






66 


Moton Colored Sr.-Jr 


80 


69 






80 


69 


80 


69 


80 


69 


80 


69 






67 


Cecil 


1,198 


1,215 

90 


206 


206 


992 


1,009 


985 


985 


1,091 


1 ,013 


1,048 


994 


6 


10 


68 




88 






88 


90 


88 


90 


88 


90 


88 


90 






69 


Chesapeake City Sr.-Jr 


89 


76 






89 


76 


88 


76 


85 


65 


77 


54 




io 


70 


Elkton Sr.-Jr 


353 


328 






353 


328 


353 


326 


321 


259 


293 


233 


6 


71 


North East Sr.-Jr 


190 


218 


126 


133 


64 


85 


64 


83 


173 


190 


166 


188 






72 




165 


198 






165 


198 


161 


192 


127 


136 


151 


160 






73 




98 


114 






98 


114 


96 


100 


95 


98 


84 


81 






74 




68 


60 


23 


25 


45 


35 


45 


35 


67 


52 


60 


57 






75 




42 


32 


30 


23 


12 


9 


12 


9 


42 


32 


42 


32 






76 


Carver Colored Sr.-Jr 


105 


99 


27 


25 


78 


74 


78 


74 


93 


91 


87 


99 







Maryland State Department of Education 235 



Public High School: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



French 


Spanish 


Agriculture 


Industrial 


Home Economics 


Business 
Subjects 


Physical 
Education 


Music 


Art-Arts 
and- Crafts 


Gen. 


Voc. 


Arts 


Edu. 


Gen. 


Voc. 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


Bt 


B 


G 


Bt 


B 


G 


po 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


1 


42 


89 


52 


90 


56 


226 


1,691 


2 


277 


18 


1,647 


314 


631 


1,051 


2,772 


2,398 


2,712 


2 ,605 


1 ,044 


1 027 


2 










56 


47 








75 


37 






102 


112 


84 


103 


3 












103 


40 








36 


79 






138 


107 


94 


92 






4 






21 


21 




38 


425 




92 




456 


51 


97 


269 


704 


596 


819 


687 


379 


369 


e 



1 A 


14 


31 


69 




18 


412 








320 


41 


219 


217 


578 


503 


468 


453 


291 


299 


6 


1 


21 










117 




74 




108 


67 


34 


82 


233 


239 


235 


263 




7 
1 














90 








78 




18 


33 


90 


68 


73 


91 






8 


13 


27 










178 








172 




83 


58 


250 


206 


192 


218 






9 


14 


27 








20 


291 


2 


74 




282 


i8 


180 


392 


270 


209 


301 


312 


202 


213 


1 n 
lU 














114 








105 








114 


105 


114 


105 






11 






























95 


74 


95 


74 


62 


54 


12 






























79 


78 


79 


78 




13 






























110 


92 


110 


92 


lio 


92 


14 














24 




37 




15 


21 






9 


9 


48 


37 






15 


163 


205 


45 


80 


80 


113 


2,230 




381 




2,493 


153 


246 


823 


3,321 


3,277 


2,375 


2,536 


1 620 


1 649 


16 


44 


59 










94 




217 




103 




98 


401 


397 


301 


58 


187 


33 


' 62 


17 


1 K 


18 






26 


22 


104 








144 




30 


45 


156 


170 


109 


155 




18 


19 


38 






17 


35 


318 








336 


28 


15 


61 


397 


421 


302 


286 


254 


249 


19 


74 


53 


29 


33 






270 








266 




94 


249 


434 


466 


126 


140 


66 


113 


20 














340 








283 








340 


283 


340 


283 


240 


203 


21 














119 








115 








119 


115 










22 














16 
















69 


47 


69 


47 


42 


47 


23 














431 








406 








429 


400 


404 


406 


404 


406 


24 














338 








355 








338 


355 


338 


355 


338 


355 


25 


11 


37 


ie 


47 


37 


56 


200 




164 




485 


125 


9 


67 


642 


719 


629 


677 


243 


214 


26 


251 


307 


237 


238 


40 


100 


4,451 


12 


221 


5 


3,705 


550 


848 


1 ,654 


7,534 


7 ,588 
'896 


5 665 
'599 


5 703 
'605 


4 819 


4 695 


27 


16 


23 


39 


37 






655 




22 




545 


69 


212 


323 


917 


585 


'553 


28 


15 


18 


21 


15 






319 








269 


42 


64 


113 


531 


531 


421 


359 


399 


375 


29 


29 


33 






40 


39 


153 








135 


29 


17 


82 


308 


338 


220 


263 


148 


OQl 


30 


19 


21 








61 


33 




64 




50 


42 


19 


59 


159 


153 


80 


87 


58 


''50 


31 


36 


73 


109 


152 






534 


'7 


48 




352 


143 


142 


215 


676 


771 


294 


281 


319 


323 


32 


48 


24 










568 


2 






463 


73 


140 


262 


773 


765 


476 


442 


476 


442 


33 


24 


58 


68 


34 






402 


2 


57 




118 


78 


189 


373 


676 


629 


292 


330 


186 


147 
iti 


34 


21 


18 










346 


1 


30 




260 


63 


60 


178 


432 


469 


264 


351 


372 


399 


35 














37 








49 








58 


67 


58 


67 


58 


67 


36 














40 








32 








58 


57 


58 


57 


OO 


44 


37 














00 








41 








fin 


fin 


fin 


fin 


fin 


An 
DU 


38 














254 








249 








548 


528 


548 


528 


904 


970 
Lit) 


39 














62 








64 








106 


92 


106 


09 

yz 


1 C\R 
lUO 


09 
Mil 


40 














642 








658 








1 1 49 


1 1 00 


1 1 40 


1 1 90 


79Q 

/ za 


71S 
/ lo 


41 






























513 


'±•±1 


t;i 1 

Olo 


447 


010 


447 


42 














72 








81 








80 


86 


75 


82 


54 


52 


43 














ini 








135 








152 


186 


114 


139 


123 


143 


44 


43 


39 

























IM 


Q1 

oiy 


oOO 


Q1 


oOO 


278 


970 


45 






























OA 
ZD 


00 

zy 


OR 


00 

zy 


26 


90 

zy 


46 


6 


5 






63 


113 


^00 








209 


100 


Oi, 


QO 

00 




4 no 


017 
Z 1 / 


1 QK 

lyo 


1 n 

iU 


9n 


47 


6 








35 


36 


163 








1 o<; 


26 


Oil 


9Q 
0» 


01 7 
ill 


104 


01 7 
Lll 


1 o<; 
lyo 






48 










28 


77 


on 
yu 








Qi 
04 


74 






1 CO 

loy 


ona 






1 n 

lU 


90 

zu 


49 


11 


25 






62 


50 


441 








Aid 


63 


149 


001 

zy 1 


7fi7 


Til 


480 


K47 


1 nn 


fii 

0-1 


50 


3 












127 








Qfi 

yo 




oy 


QQ 


1 (;n 

lOU 


1 47 
111 


OQ 

yo 


144 






51 


8 


17 






22 


i8 


122 








1 in 




Rfl 

ou 


QQ 
00 


1 7n 


1 K7 

101 


114 
111 


1 1 
1 iz 






52 






















48 




7 


8 


87 


71 






19 


13 


53 














93 








101 




32 


86 


143 


151 


107 


123 


36 




54 










18 




1 c 








29 




• • 


• ■ 


ou 


39 




• ■ 


14 


11 


55 










22 


32 


Q1 








65 


63 


11 


16 


167 


168 


1 no 
168 


168 


31 


/in 


56 


53 


87 








77 


1 oon 
1 




28 




1 ,185 


51 


319 


509 


1 ,45o 


1 ,447 


1 ,246 


1 ,392 


191 


1 04 

iy4 


57 














1 0,1 








133 




38 


91 


119 


125 


122 


141 






58 


i5 


2c 










156 








121 




37 


69 


176 


168 


142 


155 






59 


8 


7 










122 








99 




37 


38 


136 


133 


122 


106 


• • 


• • 


60 


7 


Q 

O 








28 


362 




28 




389 




89 


159 


451 


458 


372 


473 


123 


127 


61 


3 


( 










8-^ 








74 




20 


33 


113 


102 


87 


84 


29 


24 


62 


8 


1( 










95 








91 




32 


30 


99 


95 


87 


85 






63 


6 


IC 










87 








77 




35 


32 


99 


90 


88 


92 






64 


6 


11 








49 


137 








126 


ii 


31 


57 


140 


161 


103 


141 






65 














43 








46 








43 


46 


43 


46 






66 














80 








29 


40 






80 


69 


80 


69 


39 


43 


67 


6 


2C 


29 


35 




104 


958 








906 


57 


146 


339 


962 


901 


848 


936 




32 


68 


3 


A 










88 








90 




9 


22 


88 


83 


80 


81 






69 
70 














73 








59 




13 


24 


88 


74 


56 


66 










io 


is 






274 








229 




61 


113 


267 


208 


218 


202 






71 






13 


11 






152 








156 




27 


58 


174 


184 


133 


158 






72 






6 


9 




34 


120 








163 




21 


48 


154 


159 


103 


159 






73 


2 


'8 










97 








76 


3i 


15 


74 


86 


94 


85 


92 






74 


1 


8 








3i 


36 








60 












36 


35 






75 














42 




















42 


32 




32 


76 












39 


76 








73 


26 






165 


99 


95 


111 







236 Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates,Each Maryland 



County 
High School 


1 Total 
Enrollment 


1 Core 


English 


Social 
Studies 


Science 


Mathe- 
matics 


Latin 


B 


G 


B 




G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


1 


Charles 


84i 


931 


307 


34f 


53v 


582 


53"; 


58i 


762 


77{ 


69( 


75( 


3] 


12 


2 




67 


7i 


• • 


■ • 


67 


7{ 


6i 


7( 


52 


4f 


• ■ 


If 








T.a Plata fir -Tr 


I'll 


25t 


lot 


10^ 


13{ 


14£ 


135 


14J 


18{ 


162 


16; 


152 


31 


12 


4 


Nanjemoy Jr 


90 

61 


3J 


2 


12 


on 
Zl 


2t 


2{ 


2t 


32 


3J 


32 


3{ 






5 


Glasva Jr 


4{ 


32 






4J 


32 




32 


4J 


32 


4J 


32 






6 




126 


128 


126 


128 










126 


128 


126 


128 






7 




51 


38 






51 


38 


5] 


38 


51 


38 


51 


38 






8 


Bel Alton Colored Sr.-Jr 


141 


201 


69 


1 ni 
lUl 


i z 


lUL 


72 


IOC 


135 


18J 


13i 


185 






9 


Pomonkey Colored Sr.-Jr. . . . 


132 


16C 






133 


16C 


132 


16C 


129 


15C 


132 


16C 






10 


Dorchester 


fiQQ 






0/0 


4oi 


ouy 


41£ 


461 


717 


TOO 

7o2 


761 


697 


2C 


31 


11 


East New Market Sr.-Jr. 


01 


45 


32 


Za 


IS 


17 


IS 


17 


42 


45 


51 


45 


• • 




12 


Vienna Sr.-Jr 


AC\ 

41 


43 


24 


27 


16 


16 


16 


16 


34 


38 


31 


36 


2 


8 


13 


Crano Sr - Tr 


32 


45 


18 


21 


14 


24 


14 


24 


32 


45 


IS 


21 






14 






1 K 


8 


7 


A 


Q 
O 


4 


8 


12 


15 


12 


15 


• • 




15 


Cambridge Sr.-Jr 




246 






0/47 


246 


OAQ 

Zuc 


198 


192 


181 


208 


166 


18 


23 


16 




125 


118 


83 


67 


42 


51 


41 


51 


104 


93 


92 


83 






17 




172 


172 


172 


172 










172 


172 


172 


172 






18 


F.D. St. Clair Colored Sr.-Jr. 


20^ 


201 


63 


54 


146 


147 


117 


147 


129 


144 


177 


159 






19 




Z ,Wl 


2 ,024 


1 ,212 


1 ,1UU 


889 


924 


853 


889 


1 ,084 


892 


1 ,514 


1 ,416 


130 


216 


20 




589 


568 


177 


168 


412 


4UU 


410 


395 


439 


380 


301 


271 


88 


118 


21 




OAR 


OAA 
Zl'i 


1 A7 
10/ 


147 


70 


07 

y / 


oy 


07 


213 


89 


217 


210 




48 


22 




90 


74 


61 


48 


29 


26 


29 


26 


29 


26 


61 


40 


26 


26 


23 




228 


203 


156 


108 


72 


95 


59 


69 


123 


107 


174 


128 


10 


18 


24 




210 


212 


88 


76 


122 


136 


121 


132 


89 


86 


98 


84 


6 


6 


25 




117 


124 


45 


48 


72 


76 


72 


76 


53 


76 


91 


107 






26 


Elm St. Jr 


395 


394 


395 


394 










• ■ 


■ • 


395 


394 






97 
ill 




72 


64 


72 


64 


• • 


• • 




• • 


18 


16 


72 


64 






28 




154 


141 


51 


47 


103 


94 


1 Ao 
103 


94 


120 


112 


105 


118 






29 


Garrett 


820 


816 


819 


815 










399 


422 


652 


636 


16 


33 


30 


Friendsville Sr.-Jr 


122 


110 


122 


110 










55 


54 


86 


80 






31 




144 


183 


144 


183 










82 


115 


124 


181 






32 




108 


81 


108 


81 










76 


47 


87 


62 


• • 


• • 


oo 




366 


359 


366 


359 










145 


162 


276 


231 


16 


33 


34 




80 


83 


79 


82 










41 


44 


79 


82 






35 


Harford 


1,709 


1,774 


1,072 


1,061 


637 


710 


502 


599 


825 


794 


1 ,467 


1,490 


54 


104 


36 




219 


253 


135 


148 


84 


105 


84 


105 


115 


99 


184 


193 


18 


22 


37 


Bel Air Sr.-Jr 


674 


681 


426 


411 


248 


267 


159 


173 


284 


279 


565 


583 


16 


41 


38 


North Harford Sr.-Jr 


352 


366 


216 


216 


136 


150 


105 


141 


162 


146 


319 


316 


2 


16 


•JO 




238 


239 


144 


142 


94 


97 


79 


89 


98 


97 


194 


191 


18 


25 


40 


Central Colored Sr.-Jr 


138 


142 


97 


88 


41 


54 


41 


54 


78 


80 


138 


142 






41 


Havre de Grace Col. Sr.-Jr. . 


88 


93 


54 


56 


34 


37 


34 


37 


88 


93 


67 


65 






42 


Howard 


857 


842 


561 


528 


296 


314 


306 


318 


708 


677 


698 


651 


32 


34 


43 


Elkridge Sr.-Jr 


191 


189 


119 


115 


72 


74 


71 


74 


177 


157 


159 


152 


10 


7 


44 


Ellicott City Sr.-Jr 


203 


210 


127 


132 


76 


78 


87 


87 


128 


134 


164 


157 


18 


18 


45 




139 


140 


99 


94 


40 


46 


40 


46 


122 


116 


129 


114 






46 


Clarksville Sr.-Jr 


143 


127 


91 


76 


52 


51 


52 


46 


139 


112 


99 


95 


4 


9 


47 


Harriet Tubman Col. Sr.-Jr. . 


181 


176 


125 


111 


56 


65 


56 


65 


142 


158 


147 


133 






48 


Kent 


560 


498 


349 


279 


211 


219 


211 


217 


495 


418 


462 


388 


23 


37 


49 




64 


63 


43 


31 


21 


32 


21 


32 


57 


44 


60 


47 


5 


8 


50 




232 


190 


145 


103 


87 


87 


87 


85 


186 


141 


174 


126 


15 


18 


51 


Rock HaU Sr-Jr 


85 


69 


57 


42 


28 


27 


28 


27 


73 


57 


70 


48 


3 


11 


52 


Millington Jr 


26 


14 


• • 




26 


14 


26 


14 


26 


14 


26 


14 






53 




153 


162 


104 


103 


49 


59 


49 


59 


153 


162 


132 


153 






54 


Montgomery 


4,675 
598 


4,702 


1,890 


1,809 


2,774 


2,884 


2,207 


2,292 


3,503 


3,184 


3,955 


3,339 


325 


500 


55 


Bethesda-Chevy Chase Sr. . . 


637 


598 


634 


352 


378 


464 


410 


549 


313 


94 


150 


56 




719 


715 






713 


709 


564 


548 


535 


397 


466 


200 


71 


104 


57 




115 


125 


63 


62 


52 


63 


42 


52 


100 


109 


74 


74 






58 


Richard Montgomery Sr.-Jr. 


388 


405 


183 


190 


205 


215 


148 


152 


277 


321 


303 


245 


31 


31 


59 




212 


196 


112 


77 


100 


119 


87 


115 


185 


144 


173 


155 






60 




305 


2^7 


162 


132 


143 


165 


103 


129 


281 


238 


181 


183 


i4 


io 


61 




134 


148 


75 


61 


57 


87 


54 


78 


127 


124 


101 


83 






62 




673 


727 


673 


727 










370 


360 


673 


727 


53 


105 


63 


Takoma Park J r* 


591 


556 






590 


556 


591 


555 


540 


486 


591 


556 


27 


49 


64 




428 


373 


3li 


260 


117 


113 


117 


112 


251 


211 


428 


373 


23 


38 


65 




215 


204 


151 


145 


64 


59 


64 


59 


122 


112 


215 


204 


12 


13 


66 




135 


164 






135 


164 


85 


114 


92 


117 


52 


77 






67 




162 


155 


160 


155 










159 


155 


149 


149 







Maryland State Department of Education 
County Public High School: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



237 



French 


Spanish 


Agriculture 


Industrial 


Home Economici) 


Business 
Subjects 


Phj-sical 
Education 


Music 


Art-Arts 
and Crafts 


Gen. 1 Voc. 


Arts Ifidu. 


Gen. 1 Voc. 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B* 


Bt 


B G 


Bt 


B 


G 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 







123 



43 



413 
38 
150 



582 
23 

168 
30 
32 

128 
38 
77 
86 

441 
45 
43 



78 



52 



63 



91 I 358 
16i 57 
57 255 



177 



871 
70 

253 
38 



128 
38 
201 
143 133 



837 
45 
43 
40 



573 



40 
154 

38 

32 
125 

38 
201 



194 



179 



444 



35 



30 



22 



53 



110 

1,213 
298 



35 



46 



291 



90 
158 
161 

86 
214 

72 
134 

316 



102 

1,234 
291 
157 
74 
121 
137 
101 
198 
64 
91 



213 219 167 

125 117 101 

172 172 172 

209 201 133 



347 
183 
24 



30 



403 291 

59 51 

68 

33 
188 

55 



264 



824 



218 



204 



29 



,122 
125 
495 
102 
174 
138 



343 



63 



39 



30 



124 

348 
60 

103 
75 



1,043 
94 
476 
186 
142 
89 
56 

246 
78 
92 



172 



32 



18 



110 

3,315 
364 
409 
93 
225 
132 
224 
113 
417 
564 
428 
203 
6 

137 



72 



130 

2,562 
134 
148 

62 
245 

33 
132 
101 
430 
524 
373 
193 

32 
155 



46 
69 
27 

339 
45 
49 

103 
52 
53 
37 

225 
25 
25 
46 
55 
74 

35 



76 


210 


57 


54 


121 


420 


42 


79 


58 


279 


i4 


49 


7 


13 


122 


186 


18 


35 


48 


61 


12 


18 


16 


34 


28 


38 


79 


122 


8 


29 


35 


57 


36 


36 



2,062 
579 
246 
90 
226 
184 
117 
395 
72 
153 

785 
122 
143 
103 
338 



1,642 

209 



1,945 
527 
244 

74 
188 
189 
124 
394 

64 
141 



1,611 
264 
158 

90 
191 
191 

97 
395 

72 
153 

624 
106 
134 
70 
235 



m 612 



851 
190 
203 
139 
138 
181 

541 
64 

213 
85 
26 

153 



40 



1,075 

223 
405 

33 
142 

79 
102 

57 



34 



4.37 8 



112 
359 
204 
290 
132 
659 
577 

m 

215 
107 
161 



1,675! 1,284 
236 141 



4,372 
489 534 
651 



214 
101 
172 
119 

1,563 
208 
193 

74 
182 
204 
103 
394 

64 
141 



113 



234 



1,461 
184 
476 
370 
196 
142 



758 
144 
199 
137 
108 
170 

442 
56 

144 
66 
14 

162 



2,510 3 
130 
116 

65 
266 
119 
162 

78 
667 
313 
212 
203 

59 
120 



,117 
194 
175 

94 
390 
111 
164 

95 
727 
408 
373 
185 

87 
114 



1,014 
31 
51 
14 
115 

155 
5 
255 
144 
183 

22 
39 



197 
75 
172 



971 
185 
159 
16 
118 



394 
2i 
280 

198 



473 
64 
70 
113 
164 
62 



237 
109 
41 
44 
43 



103 
103 



1,344 
84 
101 
16 
213 

145 

297 
147 
290 

ii 

40 



238 * Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates, Each Maryland 



County 
High School 


Total 
Enrollment 


Core 


English 


Social 
Studies 


Science 


Mathe- 
matics 


Latin 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 



B 


G 


. B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


1 


Prince George. s 


6 067 


6 08^ 


3 698 


o ,oyy 


2 35^ 


2 46S 


14R 
Z ,040 

100 

oyo 


441 
J ,44J 


4 ,6\i 


1 

4 ,00i 


1 

5 ,007 


4 ,50( 


16J 


170 


2 


Bladensburg Sr.-Jr 


60S 


58J 


202 


1 01 
104 


40f 


40'^ 


40J 


42t 


41c 


38( 


257 


2i 


26 


3 






29^ 


1 7 A 
1/4 


1 01 
101 


lUi 


1 1 "3 
110 


1 ni 

lUl 


lie 


13c 


12] 


18J 


19^ 


7 


8 


4 




222 


19( 


1 57 
10/ 


1 on 


04 
04 


RK 
00 


1 00 


7( 


9f 


7£ 


IS'^ 


13[ 






5 




Z/O 


ouo 


1 on 

lOU 


104 

lo4 


QK 

yo 


101 
1^1 


95 


12] 


25S 


21t 


23^ 


21^ 






6 


Gwynn Park Sr - Jr 


215 


201 


126 


12S 


8S 


80 


70 


62 


14^ 


137 


17J 


14t 


• • 




7 


Oxon Hill Sr.-Jr 


oDo 




231 


ono 
zuy 


132 


1 K1 
100 


1 1 1 
101 


15C 


18£ 


156 


29t 


2il 


3C 


31 


8 


Hyattsville Sr.-Jr 


619 


62C 


290 


302 


32S 


315 


117 
00/ 


mo 
out 


361 


331 


47^ 


42t 


4J 


46 


9 




357 


356 


128 


114 


221 


225 


221 


227 


302 


266 


245 


174 


29 


28 


10 




499 


452 






499 


452 


499 


452 


469 


343 


336 


232 


17 


11 


11 


Greenbelt Sr.-Jr 


52(] 


482 


198 


071 


1 QO 


ono 


1 i 
lo4 


20J 


27fi 


208 


42C 


347 


14 


20 


12 


Bladensburg Jr 




413 


454 


411 
410 










454 


413 


454 


413 






13 




1 70 

I/O 


1 n 


1 70 
I/O 


1 74 
1/4 










17S 


174 


178 


174 






14 




267 


257 


267 


O'i? 
iOl 










257 


257 


267 


257 






15 




393 


382 


393 


382 










393 


382 


393 


382 






16 


Douglass Colored Sr.-Jr 


231 


345 


134 


182 


97 


163 


75 


163 


110 


179 


223 


341 






17 


Fairmont Hghts. Col. Sr.-Jr. 


QOQ 
OOO 


401 


07K 


OOO 


111 
llo 


169 


111 


15S 


90 


103 


344 


358 






18 


Westwood Colored Jr 


Di 


OO 


Rl 
01 


Ki 

00 










19 


18 


61 


53 






19 


Sojourner Truth Colored Jr. 


Ad 


0/ 


AQ 
40 


(;7 










48 


57 


48 


57 






20 




OQ 
\)o 




yo 


00 










93 


92 


93 


92 






21 


Queen Anne's 


565 


601 


205 


179 


360 


420 


359 


418 


502 


528 


471 


503 






22 


Sudlersville Sr.-Jr 


1 Q9 


loo 






1 19 
lO£i 


1 11 

100 


1 10 


131 


93 


121 


88 


108 






23 




201 


204 


QO 
yy 


84 
04 


102 


120 


ini 

lUl 


1 on 


192 


178 


166 


164 






24 


Stevensville Sr.-Jr 


01 


lUo 






01 

y 1 


1 flR 
lUO 


Q1 

yi 


106 


76 


73 


76 


75 






25 


Kennard Colored Sr.-Jr 


141 

I'll 


100 


1 OR 
lUO 


OK 

yo 


IK 
00 


R1 
Dl 


35 


61 


141 


156 


141 


156 






26 


St. Mary's 




KRO 

ooy 


1 01 
100 


1 1R 

loo 


14K 
040 


404 
4^4 


365 


464 


473 


439 


478 


441 


29 


4n 
4U 


27 


Margaret Brent Sr.-Jr 


1 7^ 
1/0 


100 


1 17 

11/ 


79 


00 


OR 
00 


KR 
00 


85 


131 


104 


154 


106 


o 



4 
4 


28 


Great Mills Sr.-Jr 


224 


240 


44 


42 


180 


189 


199 


230 


210 


164 


192 


164 


26 


36 


29 




91 


128 


22 


22 


69 


106 


69 


106 


91 


128 


91 


128 






30 


Jarboesville Colored Sr.-Jr. . . 


41 


A1 






41 


43 


41 


43 


41 


43 


41 


43 






31 


Somerset 


1AK 
i 'to 


71fi 
( ID 


ARK 
400 


4(11 
4U0 


070 

z/y 


11 1 
olo 


070 


310 


628 


551 


630 


55o 


lo 


1 


32 


Washington Sr.-Jr 


164 


1 KK 
100 


luy 


RK 
DO 


K4 

04 


on 
yu 


54 


90 


150 


116 


125 


98 






33 




46 


67 


35 


44 


11 


23 


11 


23 


45 


55 


37 


48 






34 


Crisfield Sr.-Jr 


197 


169 


113 


105 


84 


64 


84 


61 


177 


131 


173 


125 


i3 


\2 


35 


Deal Island Sr.-Jr 


K1 
01 


O'i 




15 


01 


19 


23 


19 


51 


34 


36 


22 






36 


Ewell Jr 


12 


7 
1 






12 


7 


12 


7 


12 


7 


12 


7 






37 


Greenwood Colored Sr.-Jr, . . 


1 cn 

18U 


loO 


1 04 
1^4 


111 
111 


KR 
00 


74 


KR 
00 


74 

/ 4 


98 


109 


1 KO 
10^ 


154 






38 


Crisfield Colored Sr.-Jr 


OK 


yy 


KR 
00 


R1 
Do 


10 

oy 


1R 
OD 


39 


36 


95 


99 


95 


99 






39 


Talbot 


D/Z 


7/in 
/ iv 


ooU 


o71 


140 
04Z 


369 


341 


361 


597 


613 


617 


595 


1Q 
00 


4K 
40 


40 


Easton Sr.-Jr 


Sox) 


ooy 


1 Rfl 
IDU 


OAK 


1 00 

i.4y 


1 K4 
104 


1 00 


146 


218 


256 


274 


077 
Lit 


04 
J4 


14 
04 


41 


St. Michaels Sr.-Jr 


1/11 
141 


1 QC 

loo 






141 


1 10 

loo 


141 


138 


137 


116 


122 


108 


9 


1 1 
1 1 


42 


Cordova Sr -Jr 


oy 


A"} 
40 


OO 

zy 


oU 


1 O 
11) 


13 


10 


13 


39 


41 


29 


29 






43 


Moton Colored Sr.-Jr 


203 


OOO 


141 


136 


62 


64 


62 


64 


203 


200 


192 


181 






44 


Washington 


3,005 


3,056 


600 


624 


2,403 


2,433 


2,095 


2,271 


2,358 


2,168 


2,300 


2,159 


84 


195 


45 




655 


708 






655 


708 


390 


528 


452 


366 


225 


137 


40 


74 


46 


Williamsport Sr.-Jr 


228 


249 


■ • 


• ■ 


228 


249 


188 


235 


188 


193 


174 


166 


6 


1 n 

lU 


47 




222 


208 


124 


90 


98 


118 


98 


118 


202 


185 


175 


168 






48 


Hancock Sr -Jr 


168 


199 


37 


42 


130 


157 


125 


155 


151 


197 


144 


146 






49 


Boonsboro Sr.-Jr 


456 


401 


• • 


■ ■ 


456 


401 


454 


401 


373 


308 


363 


313 


1 R 
10 


10 

oy 


50 


Smithsburg Sr.-Jr 


189 


206 


113 


127 


76 


79 


80 


113 


161 


166 


132 


143 






51 




32 


31 


18 


19 


14 


12 


14 


12 


32 


31 


32 


31 






52 


South Potomac Jr 


363 


341 






363 


341 


363 


341 


354 


321 


363 


341 


"9 


25 


53 


Woodland Way Jr 


340 


327 




• • 


339 


328 


339 


328 


325 


291 


340 


328 


9 


37 


54 


Washington Street Jr 


293 


315 


274 


297 


19 


18 


19 


18 


95 


88 


293 


315 


4 


10 


55 


North Street Colored Sr.-Jr. 


59 


71 


34 


49 


25 


22 


25 


22 


25 


22 


59 


71 






56 


Wicomico 


882 


1 ,021 


6 


7 


876 


1 ,014 


787 


883 


781 


831 


655 


695 


no 

98 


1 R1 
IDO 


0/ 




57 


64 






57 


64 


57 


64 


49 


52 


43 


45 






58 


Pittsville Sr.-Jr 


48 


41 






48 


41 


48 


41 


48 


41 


47 


34 






59 


Wicomico Sr.-Jr 


530 


617 






530 


617 


471 


511 


450 


463 


361 


381 


73 


lis 


60 




31 


24 


6 


7 


25 


17 


25 


17 


31 


24 


22 


14 






61 


Salisbury Colored Sr.-Jr 


216 


275 






216 


275 


186 


250 


203 


251 


182 


221 


25 


45 


62 


Worcester 


812 


880 


529 


541 


283 


339 


306 


369 


621 


701 


674 


700 


15 


19 


63 




117 


141 


78 


78 


39 


63 


47 


69 


84 


105 


87 


90 


6 


5 


64 


Snow Hill, Sr.-Jr 


161 


162 


92 


99 


69 


63 


69 


63 


116 


116 


130 


130 


9 


14 


65 




172 


209 


118 


125 


54 


84 


69 


108 


64 


128 


127 


146 






66 




78 


69 


44 


46 


34 


23 


34 


23 


73 


53 


57 


48 






67 


Worcester Colored Sr.-Jr. . . . 


164 


195 


77 


89 


87 


106 


87 


106 


164 


195 


153 


182 






68 


Stephen Long Colored Jr. . . . 


49 


40 


49 


40 










49 


40 


49 


40 






69 


Berlin Colored Jr 


71 


64 


71 


64 










71 


64 


71 


64 







* Includes the following number of girls taking General Agriculture: Baltimore, Franklin Sr.-Jr. — 4; Harford, Bel Air 
Sr.-Jr. — 300; Queen Anne's, Kennard Col. Sr.-Jr.— 30; Somerset, Washington Sr.-Jr.— 22; Worcester, Pocomoke Sr.-Jr.— 5. 

t Includes the following number of girls taking Vocational Agriculture Allegany, Flintstone Sr.-Jr. — 5, Beall Sr.-Jr. — 1; 
Carroll, Mt. Airy Sr.-Jr.— 1; Howard, Lisbon Sr.-Jr.— 1; Worcester, Snow Hill Sr. Jr.— 4, Buckingham Sr.-Jr.— 4. 



Maryland State Department of Education 239 



County Public High School: Year Ending June 30, 1951 



French 


Spanish 


Agriculture 


Industrial 


Home Economics 


1 Business 
1 Subjects 


Physical 
Education 


Music 


Art-Arts 
and Crafts 


Gen. 


Voc. 


Arts 


Edu. 


Gen. 


1 Voc. 


B 


rj 




Ci 


B* 


Bt 


g 


Q 


Bt 




Q 


G 






g 


Q 


g 


G 


B 




1 


130 


139 


180 


158 


99 


181 


3,883 


797 


343 




2,909 


504 


753 


1,729 


5,541 


5,318 


3,913 


4,13l'2,419 


2,250 


2 






87 


49 






277 




110 




170 


194 


144 


308 


484 


414 


120 


101 


131 


81 


3 












42 


192 








230 




70 


122 


274 


293 


187 


221 


45 


26 


4 


39 


\7 










161 








128 




31 


52 


215 


170 


146 


134 






5 


12 


29 




26 






164 








151 




56 


94 


267 


286 


220 


256 


68 


7i 


6 






19 


13 






147 








128 


25 


24 


61 


214 


198 


146 


127 


30 


25 


7 














286 








277 




45 


108 


355 


327 


231 


210 


228 


217 


8 


6 


21 


48 


53 






295 




90 




301 




105 


390 


482 


425 


351 


364 


51 


64 


9 


39 


32 










138 




66 




171 


32 


65 


170 


301 


264 


103 


164 


143 


96 


10 


19 


15 










357 




77 




322 




116 


219 


406 


362 


167 


200 


111 


57 


11 


15 


25 










413 








278 


30 


74 


145 


431 


355 


278 


305 


20 


20 


12 














454 


4i3 














454 


413 


454 


413 


454 


413 


13 














178 


174 














178 


174 


178 


174 


178 


174 


14 






























267 


257 


267 


257 


267 


257 


15 














393 


2i6 






172 








393 


382 


393 


382 


178 


172 


16 






















182 


165 






230 


338 


193 


305 


124 


175 


17 








23 






335 








292 


104 


23 


60 


388 


458 


303 


345 


308 


321 


18 






























61 


53 


61 


53 


61 


53 


19 






















15 








48 


57 


22 


28 


22 


28 


20 














93 








92 








93 


92 


93 


92 






2L 


26 


30 






152 


59 


459 








373 


104 


47 


152 


557 


567 


429 


426 


55 


34 


22 


9 


2 






26 


21 


68 








98 




21 


44 


132 


128 


101 


99 






23 


14 


22 








38 


168 








126 


ly 


8 


48 


194 


188 


132 


126 


55 


34 


24 


3 


6 










82 








78 




18 


60 


90 


95 


55 


45 
















126 




141 








71 


85 






141 


156 


141 


156 






26 


9 


9 






89 


124 


' 224 








339 


1 1 

110 


34 


203 


443 


503 


376 


396 


22 


22 


27 










75 


69 










128 




30 


109 


168 


156 


119 


100 






28 


9 


'9 










183 








136 


48 


4 


88 


184 


219 


166 


168 






29 










14 


55 










46 


51 




6 


91 


128 


91 


128 


22 


22 
















41 








29 


14 


















31 


24 


45 






98 


31 


343 


11 






428 




127 


153 


483 


491 


461 


434 


102 


75 


32 


14 


33 






98 


31 










62 




39 


52 


162 


153 










33 


1 


4 






















9 


19 


46 


54 


24 


32 






34 


9 


8 










164 








147 




79 


82 






164 


147 


39 


35 


35 


































28 


15 


28 


15 


36 


































12 


7 


12 


7 


37 














179 


11 






126 








180 


185 


150 


143 






38 






















99 








95 


99 


83 


90 


23 


is 


39 


18 


21 






47 


lOO 


413 


1 


60 




479 


7n 


53 


172 


549 


569 


560 


603 






40 


10 


l'^ 








40 


196 








238 




39 


103 


193 


211 


187 


269 






At 




7 








21 


123 


i 






105 




14 


69 


115 


115 


141 


128 






42 












15 






■ ■ 












39 


43 


39 


43 






43 












24 


94 




35 




136 


Ad. 






202 


200 


193 


163 






44 


45 


137 


50 


90 


104 


442 


2,091 


52 






2,038 


29U 


170 


595 


2,927 


2,966 


2,241 


2,496 


1,062 


1,039 


45 


18 


70 


50 


90 




54 


191 


5 


239 




271 


45 


56 


374 


636 


695 


161 


301 


76 


69 


46 




9 








57 


155 








146 


22 


36 


74 


224 


206 


144 


174 






47 












00 


138 


47 






114 


37 


41 


48 


222 


207 


138 


198 


108 


58 


48 


'4 


\2 








Oi 


99 








109 


63 






168 


199 


156 


196 






49 


15 


16 








92 


357 








232 


Q1 

yi 


37 


99 


408 


372 


462 


350 






50 


6 


18 








79 


151 








98 


32 






185 


206 


137 


198 






51 






















31 








32 


31 


32 


31 






52 












29 


334 








341 








363 


341 


363 


341 


308 


306 


53 












19 


320 








328 








337 


323 


320 


328 


320 


328 


54 














287 








297 








293 


315 


269 


308 


216 


229 


55 


'2 


12 










59 








71 








59 


71 


59 


71 


34 


49 


56 


6 


IC 


9 


28 




115 


602 








601 




119 


210 


490 


598 


562 


725 


272 


244 


57 


6 


10 










57 








64 












52 


53 


52 


53 


58 














48 








41 












48 


41 


48 


41 


59 






g 


28 




70 


ooy 












lUD 


1 an 


o'io 




248 


383 


141 


126 


60 


































^31 


24 


31 


24 


61 












45 


138 








206 




i3 


24 


147 


206 


183 


224 






62 


5 


13 


13 


12 


21 


131 


375 


17 




24 


352 


74 


151 


235 


765 


796 


596 


671 


208 


210 


63 








7 


21 




94 








78 




27 


53 


110 


140 


90 


106 






64 












34 


124 






24 


121 




25 


52 


154 


149 


118 


135 






65 


5 


is 








32 


92 








117 




72 


89 


148 


164 


104 


131 


60 


57 


66 
67 






i3 


'5 






65 


i7 






36 




27 


41 


69 


44 




















65 












74 






164 


195 


164 


195 


77 


89 


68 






























49 


40 


49 


40 






69 






























71 


64 


71 


64 


n 


64 



X Includes the following number of girls and boys taking Diversified Occupations 

Baltimore, Kenwood Sr.-Jr.— 11 girls; Montgomery, Bethesda-Chevy Chase Sr.-Jr.— 15 girls; Montgomery Blair Sr.-Jr. 

—46 boys, 31 girls; Richard Montgomery Sr.-Jr.— 13 boys, 11 girls; Prince George's, Mt. Rainier Sr.-Jr.- 9 boys, 17 

girls; Maryland Park Sr.-Jr.— 12 boys, 23 girls. 
° Includes 3 boys taking Vocational Home Economics in Baltimore, Catonsville Sr.-Jr. 



240 



Eighty-Fifth Annual Report 



3 ^ 



.is ■'^ 









lO 

e<5 


eo 


«0 U5 
O C<1 


t- 


00-1- 

eo 




t- OOr-l 
i-H t- t- 


c3 o 




eo o 






o'd 


o 




d 


OO 


o 


o 


o 


odo 


OO 


O 


OO 


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INDEX 



A 

Academic course, each high school, 228-233 
Accreditation and certification, 35-38 
Administration 
General control 

Cost per pupil, 152-153 
Expenditure, 220 
Per cent for, 150-151 
Superintendents, 3, 5-7, 215, 220 
Adult education, 140-142, 160, 163-164, 222 
Agriculture 

Adult education, 140-141 
Enrollment, 86-87, 97 

Each high school, 234-239 
Failures and withdrawals, 107 
Federal aid, 160-162, 164 
Schools offering, 108, 234-239 
State supervision, 3 
Teachers, 108 
Aid from State and /or Federal funds 

Counties and Baltimore City, distribution by 
type of fund: 

1950-1951, 148-149, 198, 216-217 

1923-1951, 146-147 
State teachers colleges, 188-189, 198, 200 
Vocational education 160-164, 198, 217 
Vocational rehabilitation, 145, 198 
Appropriations 
County 

1950-1951, 148-149, 173-175, 198, 216, 218 
1923-1951, 146-147 
State 

1950-1951, 148-149, 198, 216 

Art 

Enrollment, high school, 86-87. 98 
Each high school, 234-239 

Schools offering, 108, 234-239 

Teachers, 108 
Assessable basis, 177-179 
Attendance 

Aggregate days of, 212 

Average daily, 211 

Each high school, 228-233 

Index of elementary school, 62 

Per cent of, 60-63, 213 

Summer school pupils, 142 

Teachers at summer school, 114 

Workers (see Pupil personnel) 
Atypical children, 57 
Auxiliary agencies 

Cost per pupil for, 154-157 

Expenditures for, 222, 224-227 

Per cent of current expense budget, 150-151 

B 

Bands, orchestras, glee clubs, 100 

Basic aid per classroom unit, 198, 216 

Belonging, average number, 210 

Each high school, 228-233 

Per teacher, 129-130 
Birth rates, 58-59 

Board of Education, State, 3, 198-199 
Boards of Education, County, 5-7 
Bonds outstanding, school, 170 
Books and instructional materials 
Cost per pupil 

Elementary, 154, 156 
High, 155, 157 
Expenditures 
All schools, 221 
Elementary, 224, 226 
High, 225, 227 
Per cent of current expense budget, 150-151 
Boys and girls * 
Enrollment 
By grade, 63 
Total 

Nonpifblic school, 204-209 
Public school, 202-203 
Graduates, high school, 78-85, 228-233 
Budget (s) 

Baltimore City, county, local 



B— (Continued) 

1950-1951, 148-149, 173-175, 219 
1923-1951, 146-147 

State public school, 198 

State teachers colleges, 198, 200 
Building program, school. 10-12 
Buildings 

Cost (see Capital outlay) 

Number of, 135-139, 201 

Value of school, per pupil, 171-172 
Business education 

Adult, 140-142 

Enrollment, 86-87, 95, 99, 160-162, 164 

Each high school, 234-239 
Failures and withdrawals, 106 
Schools offering, 108, 234-239 
Teachers, 108 

c 

Capital outlay, school 

By site, building, equipment, 223 

By type of school, 154-157, 169, 224-227 

By year, 1923-1951, 146-147 

Census, school, 1950, 69-77 

Certificates held by county teachers, 115-119 

Certification and accreditation, 35-38 

Evening school, 140-142, 222 

Size of, 129-130 

Special for handicapped, 55-56 

Summer school, Baltimore City, 142 
Clerks, county schools, 110, 215 
Colleges 

High school graduates 
of 1950 entering, 81-85 

of 1951 entering State teachers colleges, 79, 
228-233 
Junior, 184, 186-187 
State teachers, 4, 182-189 

Training teachers appointed in Maryland coun- 
ties, 112-113 
Commercial (see Business education) 
Consolidation 

Decrease in one-teacher schools, 134 

Transportation of pupils, 164-168 
Construction accounts. State teachers colleges, 

196-197 
Core program 

Enrollment, 86-87 

Each high school, 234-239 

Schools offering, 108, 234-239 

Teachers, 108 
Cost per pupil 

Analyzed for elementary and high, 154-157 

By type of school, 153 

General control, 152-153 

Individual high schools, 228-233 

State teachers colleges, 188 

Transported, 164, 167 
Costs (see Expenditures) 

County superintendents, directors, supervisors, 5-7 
Courses in individual high schools, 228-233 
Crippled children, services for, 55-56, 194 
Current Expenses 

Cost per pupil, 152-157 

Individual high schools, 228-233 
Expenditures 
All schools, 219 

By source of funds, 148-149 
By type of school, 224-227 



D 

Dates 

Days in session, 50, 213 

Opening and closing of schools, 50 
Debt service 

1950-1951, 171, 173-175, 223 

Tax rate for, 176 
Dental program, 195 
Disbursements (see Kxpenditures) 
Distributive education, 160-162, 164 



Index 



243 



D — (Continued) 

Driver education and training, high school 
Enrollment, 101 
Schools offering, 108 
Teachers, 108 



E 

Elementary schools, supervision, 109, 215 
Employment of high school graduates, 80-85 
English, high school 
Enrollment, 86-87, 89 

Each high school, 234-239 
Failures and withdrawals, 106-107 
Schools offering, 108, 234-239 
Teachers, 108 
Enrollment 

Adult, 140, 142 
Atypical children, 57 
Elementary. 51, 54, 63-65, 202-209 
Grade or year, 63-65 
High school 

Course, each school, 229-233 

Growth in, 158-159 

Subjects, 86-87, 89-99, 101 

Each school, 234-239 
Year, 63-65, 88 

Each school, 228-233 
Increase in, 52-54 

Nonpublic, private and parochial, 51, 53-54, 

204-209 
Public, 51-53, 63-65, 202-203 
State teachers colleges, 184-186 
Subject, high school, 86-87, 89-99, 101 

Each high school, 234-239 
Summary, 51-54 

Summer schools, Baltimore City, 142 
Equalization fund, 148-149, 216 
Equivalence examinations, 143 
Evening schools and courses 
Enrollment, 140, 142 
Expenditures, 160, 163-164, 222 
Expenditures, 219-227 

(See also General control. Instruction, Opera- 
tion, Maintenance, Auxiliary agencies. Fixed 
charges, Payments to adjoining counties, Cur- 
rent expenses. Debt service. Capital outlay) 
Elementary schools, 224-226 
Evening schools, 160, 163-164, 222 
Health, 222 
High schools, 215, 227 
Libraries, 222 
Rehabilitation, 45-49 
Salaries 
Allischools, 221 
Elementary, 224, 226 
High, 158-159, 225, 227 
Vocational, 160-164 
State teachers colleges, 188-189. 198, 200 
Total, by major classifications, 198, 219 
Transportation, 164, 166-167, 222 
Vocational, Federal, 160-164, 217 



F 

Failures (see Nonpromotions) 
Federal Aid 

Vocational education, 160-164, 198, 217 
Administration and supervision, 164 
Salaries of teachers, 160-163 
Baltimore City, 160-162 
County, day, 160-162 
County, evening, 160, 163 
Fees in State teachers coUeges, 188-189, 198, 200 
Financial statements 
County schools, 216-227 
State public schools, 198 
State teachers colleges, 196-198, 200 
First grade nonpromotions, 68 
Fixed charges, 222 



F— (Continued) 

French 

Enrollment, 86-87, 96 

Each high school, 234-239 
Failures and withdrawals, 106 
Schools offering, 108, 234-239 
Teachers, 108 



G 

General control 

Cost per pupil, 152-153 

Expenditures, 220 

Per cent for, 150-151 
Glee clubs, bands, orchestras, 100 
Grade enrollment, 63-65, 88 
Graduates 

High school, 78-85 

Entering State teachers colleges, 79, 81-82. 
84-85 

From each school, 228-233 
Occupations of, 80-85 
State teachers colleges. 182-183 
Guidance, teachers of, 108 



H 

Handicapped children 

Expenditures, 55, 198 

Home instruction, 55, 202-203 

Hospital schools, 55, 202-203 

Institutions for, 55, 57 

Opportunities for education of, 55-56 

Receipts from State for, 55, 198, 216 

Transportation of, 55 
Health 

Activities of State and County Departments of, 
194-195 

Expenditures, all schools, 222 
Hearing, conservation of, 55-56 
High school equivalence examinations, 143 
High schools 

Aid for, 216 

Disbursements, 225, 227 

Individual, 228-239 

Supervision, 109, 215 
Home economics 

Adult, 140-142, 160, 164 

Enrollment, 86-87, 97 

Each high school, 234-239 

Federal aid, 160-164 

Schools offering, 108, 234-239 

Teachers, 108 
Home instruction of pupils, 55, 202-203 
Hospital instruction of pupils, 55, 202-203 



I 

Immunizations, 194 
Income payments, per capita, 181 
Income tax, per capita, 180 
Incorporated towns, levy for, 174-175 
Index of school attendance, 62 
Industrial arts (see Trades and industries) 
Instruction, division of, 26-32 

Cost per pupil, 154-157 

Expenditures, 224-227 

Salaries, supervision, books, etc., 221 
State teachers colleges, 188-189 

Per cent of current expense budget, 148-149 
Inventories, State teachers colleges, 189 



J 

Janitors, repair, utility men, 110 
Junior colleges, 184, 186-187 



K 

Kindergartens, 63-65 



244 



Index 



L 

Languages (see English, French, etc.) 

Late entrants, elementary, 62 

Latin (see French) 

Legislation, 13-20 

Length of session, 50, 213 

Letter of transmittal, 9 

Levies, county, 173-175 

Libraries 

Expenditures, 193, 221 

Public, 192, 240-241 

School, 193 

Library extension, 4, 39-44, 191-193, 198, 240-241 
Lip reading classes, 56, 142 
Lunch program, school, 33 



M 

Maintenance 

Cost per pupil, 154-157 

Expenditures, 222, 224-227 

Per cent of current expense budget, 150-151 
Materials of instruction and books (see Books and 

instructional materials) 
Mathematics, high school 

Enrollment, 86-87, 94-95 
Each high school, 234-239 

Failures and withdrawals, 106-107 

Schools offering, 108, 234-239 

Teachers, 108 
Medical examinations 

Pupils, 194 

Teachers, 198 
Men teachers, 112, 214-215 
Mentally handicapped children, 56 
Minutes, State Board, 21-25 
Music, high school 

Enrollment, 86-87, 98 

Each high school, 234-239 

Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 100 

Schools offering, 108, 234-239 

Teachers, 108 



N 

Night schools (see Evening schools. Adult educa- 
tion) 

Nonpromotions 
Elementary, 66-68 
First grade, 68 

Subject, high schools, 102-107 

Each subject, 106-107 

One or more subjects, 102-105 
Number belonging, 210 
Each high school, 228-233 
Per teacher, 129-130 
Number of schools 

For atypical children, 57 
Having one teacher, 134 
Nonpublic, 51, 204-209 
Public, 51, 201 

Elementary, 134-136 

High. 137-139 



o 

Occupations of high school graduates, 80-85 
One-teacher schools 

Cost per pupil, 154-157 

Decrease in, 134 

Number belonging in, 134 
Per teacher, 129 

Number of, 134, 201 

Per cent of attendance in, 61 
Operation 

Cost per pupil, 154-157 

Expenditures, 221, 224-227 

Per cent of current expense budget, 150-151 
Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 100 



P 

Parent-teacher associations. 111 

Parochial and private schools, 51, 53-54, 204-209 

Part-payment of salaries, 216 

Payments to adjoining counties, 150-151 

Pensions, 190, 198 

Physical education and health, 194-195, 222 
Physical education and recreation 

Appropriations for, 198 

Enrollment, high school, 86-87, 98 
Each high school. 234-239 

Schools offering, 108, 234-239 

Teachers, 108 
Physical examinations (see Medical examinations) 
Physically handicapped children, 55-56 
Presidents of State teachers colleges, 4 
Professional and clerical staff, counties, 215 
Private and parochial schools, 51, 53-54, 204-209 
Property, valuation of 

Counties and Baltimore City, 177-178 

School, 171-172 
Psychology (see Social studies) 
Pupil personnel, 5-7 

Supervisors of, 109, 215 
Salaries of, 220 
Pupils 

Atypical, 57 

Nonpublic, 51, 53-54, 204-209 
One-teacher schools, 134 
Per teacher, 129-130 
Public 

Enrollment, 51-54, 202-203 
Number attending, 211 
Number belonging, 210 
Per cent of attendance, 60-63, 213 
Transported, 164-165 



R 

Receipts from 

All sources, 218 

Federal government, 217 

Evening schools, counties, 163 
Teachers' salaries, counties, 160-164 
Vocational education, 160-164 

State 

Distributed by type of fund, 146-147, 198, 216 
Total and per cent, 146-147 
Teachers colleges, 188-189, 198, 200 
Rehabilitation, Vocational, 3-4, 45-49, 144-145, 
198-199 

Repair, utility men, janitors, 110 
Resignations, teachers, 120-122 
Retarded children, program for, 55-57 
Retirement system for teachers, 4, 190, 198 



s 

Salaries 

Growth of high school, 158-159 
Per cent of school budget, 150-151 
Superintendents, 220 
Supervisors, 221 

Pupil personnel, 221 
Teachers 

Average per teacher, 130-133 
Cost per pupil, 154-157 
Total 

Elementary, 224, 226 
High, 158-159, 225, 227 
Vocational, 160-164 
School building program, 10-12 
School census, 1950, 69-77 
School lunch program, 33 
Schools 

For atypical children, 57 
Number of, 51, 134-139, 201 
Science, high school 

Enrollment, 86-87, 92-93 

Each high school, 234-239 
Failures and withdrawals, 106-107 
Schools offering, 108, 234-239 
Teachers, 108 



Index 



245 



S— (Continued) 

Session, length of, 50, 213 
Sex of teachers, 112, 214-215 
Sight conservation classes, 56 
Size of 

Classes, 129-130 
Schools 

Each high school. 228-233 
Elementary, 134-136 
High. 137-139 
Teaching staff. 134-135. 137. 139. 214-215 
Social studies 

Enrollment, 86-87, 90-91 

Each high school, 234-239 
Failures and withdrawals, 106-107 
Schools offering. 108, 234-239 
Teachers, 108 
Source of new teachers, 128 
Spanish (see French) 

Special classes for handicapped, 55-57, 198 

Special high school teachers, 108 

State 

Aid to schools 

1923-1951. 146-147 

Showing various funds, 198, 216 

Board of Education, 3, 198 
Excerpts from minutes, 21-25 

Department of Education, 3-4, 198-199 

Department of Health, school activities, 194-195 

Income taxes, 180 

Public school budget, 198-199 

Teachers colleges, 4, 79, 81-82, 84-85, 182-186, 
188-189, 198, 200, 228-233 

Teachers' retirement system, 4, 190, 198 
Statistical tables, financial statements, 196-241 
Stenography, typing, bookkeeping, 95, 99 
Subjects studied in high schools, 86-101 

Each high school, 234-239 
Summer school attendance 

County teachers, 114 

Pupils, 142 
Superintendents, 3-4, 5-7, 215 
Supervision, supervisors 

Cost per pupil, 154-157 

Cost, salaries, exi>enses, 219 
By type of school, 224-227 

Names of, 3-4, 5-7 

Number of, 109, 215 

Per cent of current expense budget, 150-151 
Salaries of, 221, 224-227 
State, 3-4 
Surplus property, 34 



T 

Taxable basis, 177-179 

Tax dollar, distribution of school, 150-151 

Tax rates, county, 176 

Teacher (s) 

Academic, high school, 108 

Certification of, 35-38, 115-119 

Colleges, 4, 79, 81-82, 84-85, 182-186, 188-189, 

198, 200, 228-233 
Growth in number, 158-159 
Number of, 214-215 

For each high school subject, 108 
In each high school, 228-233 
In schools of each type 



T — (Continued) 

Atypical, 57 
Nonpublic, 204-209 
Public, 214-215 

Summer schools, Baltimore City, 142 
Of atypical children, 57 
Pupils per, 129-130 
Resignations, 120-121 
Salaries, growth in high school, 158-159 
Sex of, 112, 214-215 
Source of, new to counties, 128 
Special subjects, high school, 108 
Summary, elementary and high, public and non- 
public, 51 
Summer school attendance, 114 
Training institutions, 182-186, 188-189, 198, 200 
Turnover of, 120-127 
Withdrawals, by subject taught, 122 
Teachers' retirement system 
Financial statement, 190, 198 
Staff, 4 

Teachers' contributions to, 190 
Trades and industries (Industrial arts) 

Adult, 140-142. 160, 163 

EnroUment, 86-87, 97, 161-162 
Each high school, 234-239 

Federal aid, 160-164 

Schools offering, 108, 234-239 

Teachers, 108 
Training centers. State teachers colleges, 184-185 
Transmittal, letter of, 9 
Transportation of pupils, 164-1 6S, 222 

Cost, total and per pupil, 164, 166-167, 222 

Per cent transported, 164-165 
Tuition charges. State teachers colleges, 188-189 
Turnover in teaching staff, 120-127 



V 

Value of 

Assessable property, 177-179 

School property, 171-172 
Vocational education, 3, 5-7, 33-34, 160-164, 198, 

217 

Enrollment 

Day schools, 86-87, 97. 152-153, 234-239 
Evening schools, 140-142, 163 
Federal aid, 160-164, 198, 217 
State aid, 198 
Vocational guidance, 108, 164 
Vocational rehabilitation, 3-4, 45-49, 144-145, 198 



w 



War emergency certificates, 115-119 
Wealth back of each pupil, 179 
Withdrawals of pupils 

Elementary, 62 

High, 106-107 
Withdrawals of teachers, 120-121 

By subjects taught, 122 



Y 

Year, length of school, 50, 213 



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